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Legal psychology 8.0.0
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Legal psychology involves empirical, psychological research of thelaw, legal institutions, and people who come into contact with thelaw. Legal psychologists typically take basic social and cognitiveprinciples and apply them to issues in the legal system such aseyewitness memory, jury decision-making, investigations, andinterviewing. The term "legal psychology" has only recently comeinto usage, primarily as a way to differentiate the experimentalfocus of legal psychology from the clinically-oriented forensicpsychology. this app contains 67 topics related to theeasy-to-understand psychology law Support Language: - العربية -català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى -français - Magyar - italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - polski -Português - slovenski -Türkçe - українська
types of pistols 8.0.0
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a handgun is a firearm designed to be handheld, in either one orboth hands. this characteristic differentiates handguns as ageneral class of firearms from long guns such as rifles andshotguns (which usually can be braced against the shoulder). majorhandgun subtypes are the revolver and pistol (including single-shotpistols, semi-automatic pistols, and machine pistols); othersubtypes include derringers and pepperboxes. the words "pistol" and"handgun" have overlapping variations, in meaning. although handgunuse often includes bracing with a second hand, the essentialdistinguishing characteristic of a handgun is its facility forone-handed operation. this app contains an attachment about varioustypes of pistol. support language: - deutsch -english -español-suomi -français -italiano -japanese -norsk -polski -українська
Concept Psychology 7.0.0
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topic in this app: -human behavior -motivation -neurologicaldisorders -deception -epistemology -good articles -hypnosis-neuropsychology -syndromes -anxiety disorders -error -motivationaltheories -ego psychology -ethology -goal -happiness -humandevelopment -machiavellianism -motor control -neuropsychologicalassessment -neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders-positive mental attitude support language: - العربية - català -čeština - dansk - deutsch - english - español - فارْسِى - suomi -français - magyar - italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - nederlands - norsk -polski - português - српски - svenska - українська
Herbal medicines free 7.0.0
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Herbal medicines are naturally occurring, plant-derived substancesthat are used to treat illnesses within local or regional healingpractices. These products are complex mixtures of organic chemicalsthat may come from any raw or processed part of a plant. Herbalmedicine has its roots in every culture around the world. There aremany different systems of traditional medicine, and the philosophyand practices of each are influenced by social conditions,environment and geographic location, but these systems all agree ona holistic approach to life. Well-known systems of herbal medicinelike Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurvedic Medicine believe inthe central idea that there should be an emphasis on health ratherthan on disease. By using healing herbs, people can thrive andfocus on their overall conditions, rather than on a particularailment that typically arises from a lack of equilibrium of themind, body and environment. Although botanical medicine has beenpracticed for thousands of years, it continues to be of use in themodern, Western world. The World Health Organization recentlyestimated that 80 percent of people worldwide rely on herbalmedicines for some part of their primary health care, and theworldwide annual market for these products is approaching $60billion. People in the United States have become more interested inherbal medicine because of the rising cost of prescriptionmedication and the returning interest in natural or organicremedies. Whole herbs contain many ingredients that are used totreat diseases and relieve symptoms. Herbal medicine, also calledbotanical medicine, uses the plant’s seeds, berries, roots, leaves,bark or flowers for medicinal purposes. The biological propertiesof these plants have beneficial effects. Other factors areresponsible for their benefits as well, such as the type ofenvironment in which the plant grew, the way in which it washarvested and how it was processed. The plant is either sold raw oras extracts, where it’s macerated with water, alcohol or othersolvents to extract some of the chemicals. The resulting productscontain dozens of chemicals, including fatty acids, sterols,alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, saponins and others. thisapplication contains information herbal medicine 730 disesrtaiimages and descriptions are easy to understand. Support Language: -Azərbaycan - العربية - Magyar - català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch- English - Íslenska - Latviešu - lietuvių - Español - فارْسِى -suomi - français - Indonesia - italiano - română - 日本語 - 한국어 -Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Português - Русский - slovenský -slovenski - Svenska - Türkçe - українська - Svenska - eesti
Car Engines 11.0.0
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How Cars Work provides the basic vocabulary and mechanicalknowledge to help a reader talk intelligently with mechanicsunderstand shop manuals, and diagnosis car problems. How Cars Workis a completely illustrated primer describing the 220 mostimportant car parts and how they work. This mini test book includeswonderfully simple line drawings and clear language to describe allthe automotive systems as well as a glossary, index, and a testafter each chapter. How Cars Work provides the basic vocabulary andmechanical knowledge to help a reader talk intelligently withmechanics understand shop manuals, and diagnosis carproblems.guides the reader with a one topic per page format thatdelivers information in bite size chunks, just right for teenageboys. Support language: - العربية - català - Čeština - Dansk -Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français -Indonesia - italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk - polski -Português - Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska - Türkçe -українська
Rocks & Minerals Book 9.0.0
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If you want to know nearly everything there is to know about rocksand minerals, here are our books to read about Minerals. this bookcontains 450 about rock types and minerals with colors and shapesto make simple and accurate identification. Suport language: -English - العربية - հայերեն - Беларуская - Български - Magyar -Tiếng Việt - Galego - Nederlands - Ελληνικά - ქართული - Dansk -Íslenska - Español - italiano - català - 中文 - 한국어 - Latviešu -lietuvių - Deutsch - Norsk - فارْسِى - polski - Português - română- Русский - Српски - slovenský - slovenski - ภาษาไทย - Türkçe-українська -suomi -français -हिन्दी- -hrvatski -Čeština -Svenska-eesti -日本語 -Euskara -Indonesia
Mental disorders 6.0.0
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a mental disorder, also called a mental illness or psychiatricdisorder, is a behavioral or mental pattern that may causesuffering or a poor ability to function in life. such features maybe persistent, relapsing and remitting, or occur as a singleepisode. many disorders have been described, with signs andsymptoms that vary widely between specific disorders. suchdisorders may be diagnosed by a mental health professional. thecauses of mental disorders are often unclear. theories mayincorporate findings from a range of fields. mental disorders areusually defined by a combination of how a person behaves, feels,perceives, or thinks. this may be associated with particularregions or functions of the brain, often in a social context. amental disorder is one aspect of mental health. cultural andreligious beliefs, as well as social norms, should be taken intoaccount when making a diagnosis. services are based in psychiatrichospitals or in the community, and assessments are carried out bypsychiatrists, psychologists, and clinical social workers, usingvarious methods but often relying on observation and questioning.treatments are provided by various mental health professionals.psychotherapy and psychiatric medication are two major treatmentoptions. other treatments include social interventions, peersupport, and self-help. in a minority of cases there might beinvoluntary detention or treatment. prevention programs have beenshown to reduce depression. common mental disorders includedepression, which affects about 400 million, dementia which affectsabout 35 million, and schizophrenia, which affects about 21 millionpeople globally. stigma and discrimination can add to the sufferingand disability associated with mental disorders, leading to varioussocial movements attempting to increase understanding andchallenge. this app contains about 205 mental disorder topicsclearly and easily understood. support language: - english -español - eesti - فارْسِى - suomi - français - עִבְרִית - magyar -indonesia - italiano- - japanese - korean - lietuvių - nederlands -norsk - polski - português - русский - српски - svenska - türkçe -українська
Books of the Ancient 7.0.0
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this app contains the best information but the library of ancientbooks is important for your reference! there are 170 books fromvarious countries with easy to understand and reliableexplanations. ***Support Languange*** - Български - català -Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - français - Magyar -Indonesia - italiano - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Português -Svenska
internal combustion engine (ICE) 6.0.0
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An internal combustion engine (ICE) is a heat engine where thecombustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in acombustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluidflow circuit. In an internal combustion engine, the expansion ofthe high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustionapplies direct force to some component of the engine. The force isapplied typically to pistons, turbine blades, rotor or a nozzle.This force moves the component over a distance, transformingchemical energy into useful mechanical energy. The firstcommercially successful internal combustion engine was created byÉtienne Lenoir around and the first modern internal combustionengine was created in by Nikolaus Otto (see Otto engine). The terminternal combustion engine usually refers to an engine in whichcombustion is intermittent, such as the more familiar four-strokeand two-stroke piston engines, along with variants, such as thesix-stroke piston engine and the Wankel rotary engine. A secondclass of internal combustion engines use continuous combustion: gasturbines, jet engines and most rocket engines, each of which areinternal combustion engines on the same principle as previouslydescribed.Firearms are also a form of internal combustion engine.In contrast, in external combustion engines, such as steam orStirling engines, energy is delivered to a working fluid notconsisting of, mixed with, or contaminated by combustion products.Working fluids can be air, hot water, pressurized water or evenliquid sodium, heated in a boiler. ICEs are usually powered byenergy-dense fuels such as gasoline or diesel, liquids derived fromfossil fuels. While there are many stationary applications, mostICEs are used in mobile applications and are the dominant powersupply for vehicles such as cars, aircraft, and boats. Typically anICE is fed with fossil fuels like natural gas or petroleum productssuch as gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. There is a growing usageof renewable fuels like biodiesel for compression ignition enginesand bioethanol or methanol for spark ignition engines. Hydrogen issometimes used, and can be obtained from either fossil fuels orrenewable energy. The app is a complete 90 topics of InternalCombustion Engine in detail! Support Language: - Čeština - Deutsch- English - Español - فارْسِى - français - italiano - Nederlands -Norsk - polski - Português - Русский - slovenský - Svenska -українська - Japanese
Music theory 6.0.0
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Music theory is the study of the practices and possibilities ofmusic. The Oxford Companion to Music describes three interrelateduses of the term "music theory": The first is what is otherwisecalled 'rudiments', currently taught as the elements of notation,of key signatures, of time signatures, of rhythmic notation, and soon. The second is the study of writings about music from ancienttimes onwards. The third is an area of current musicological studythat seeks to define processes and general principles in music — asphere of research that can be distinguished from analysis in thatit takes as its starting-point not the individual work orperformance but the fundamental materials from which it is built.Music theory is frequently concerned with describing how musiciansand composers make music, including tuning systems and compositionmethods among other topics. Because of the ever-expandingconception of what constitutes music (see Definition of music), amore inclusive definition could be that music theory is theconsideration of any sonic phenomena, including silence, as theyrelate to music. This is not an absolute guideline for example, thestudy of "music" in the Quadrivium liberal arts universitycurriculum that was common in medieval Europe was an abstractsystem of proportions that was carefully studied at a distance fromactual musical practice. However, this medieval discipline becamethe basis for tuning systems in later centuries, and it isgenerally included in modern scholarship on the history of musictheory. Support Language: - català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch -English - Español - finland - français - nork - italiano - Japanese- Nederlands - polski - Português - Svenska - українська
Cactus 7.0.0
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A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is a member of theplant family Cactaceae,[Note 1] a family comprising about 127genera with some 1750 known species of the order Caryophyllales.The word "cactus" derives, through Latin, from the Ancient Greekκάκτος, kaktos, a name originally used by Theophrastus for a spinyplant whose identity is not certain. Cacti occur in a wide range ofshapes and sizes. Most cacti live in habitats subject to at leastsome drought. Many live in extremely dry environments, even beingfound in the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth.Cacti show many adaptations to conserve water. Almost all cacti aresucculents, meaning they have thickened, fleshy parts adapted tostore water. Unlike many other succulents, the stem is the onlypart of most cacti where this vital process takes place. Mostspecies of cacti have lost true leaves, retaining only spines,which are highly modified leaves. As well as defending againstherbivores, spines help prevent water loss by reducing air flowclose to the cactus and providing some shade. In the absence ofleaves, enlarged stems carry out photosynthesis. Cacti are nativeto the Americas, ranging from Patagonia in the south to parts ofwestern Canada in the north—except for Rhipsalis baccifera, whichalso grows in Africa and Sri Lanka. Support Language: - català -Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français - Magyar -italiano - lietuvių - Nederlands - polski - Portuguךs
Theoretical physics 5.0.0
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Theoretical physics is a branch of physics that employsmathematical models and abstractions of physical objects andsystems to rationalize, explain and predict natural phenomena. Thisis in contrast to experimental physics, which uses experimentaltools to probe these phenomena. The advancement of sciencegenerally depends on the interplay between experimental studies andtheory. In some cases, theoretical physics adheres to standards ofmathematical rigor while giving little weight to experiments andobservations. For example, while developing special relativity,Albert Einstein was concerned with the Lorentz transformation whichleft Maxwell's equations invariant, but was apparently uninterestedin the Michelson–Morley experiment on Earth's drift through aluminiferous ether.[citation needed] Conversely, Einstein wasawarded the Nobel Prize for explaining the photoelectric effect,previously an experimental result lacking a theoreticalformulation. Support Language: -African - Azərbaycan - العربية -Magyar - català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch - English - Íslenska -Latviešu - lietuvių - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français -Indonesia - italiano - română - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk -polski - Português - Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska -Türkçe - українська - Svenska - eesti
Architectural 5.0.0
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Architectural elements are the unique details and component partsthat, together, form the architectural style of houses, buildingsand structures. Media related to Architectural elements (category)This terminology does not include: * Terms for buildings as a whole(e.g. church, mansion) refer to: Category:Buildings and structuresand List of building types * Names for parts of buildings definedby their function (e.g. kitchen, nave) refer to: Category:Rooms *The names of styles of buildings or architectural movements (e.g.gothic, Bauhaus) refer to: Category Architectural styles * Buildingmaterials or construction methods (e.g. thatch) refer to: CategoryBuilding materials Support Languange: ✔ العربية ✔ Български ✔català ✔ Čeština ✔ Dansk ✔ Deutsch ✔ English ✔ Español ✔ eestiet ✔Euskara ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ עִבְרִית ✔ hrvatski ✔ Magyar ✔italiano ✔Japanese ✔ korean ✔ Nederlands ✔ Norsk ✔ polski ✔Português ✔ română ✔ Русский ✔ slovenský ✔ slovenski ✔ Српски ✔Svenska ✔ українська
List of architectural styles 5.0.0
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An architectural style is characterized by the features that make abuilding or other structure notable and historically identifiable.A style may include such elements as form, method of construction,building materials, and regional character. Most architecture canbe classified as a chronology of styles which changes over timereflecting changing fashions, beliefs and religions, or theemergence of new ideas, technology, or materials which make newstyles possible. Styles therefore emerge from the history of asociety and are documented in the subject of architectural history.At any time several styles may be fashionable, and when a stylechanges it usually does so gradually, as architects learn and adaptto new ideas. Styles often spread to other places, so that thestyle at its source continues to develop in new ways while othercountries follow with their own twist. A style may also spreadthrough colonialism, either by foreign colonies learning from theirhome country, or by settlers moving to a new land. After a stylehas gone out of fashion, there are often revivals andre-interpretations. For instance, classicism has been revived manytimes and found new life as neoclassicism. Each time it is revived,it is different. Vernacular architecture works slightly differentlyand is listed separately. It is the native method of constructionused by local people, usually using labour-intensive methods andlocal materials, and usually for small structures such as ruralcottages. It varies from region to region even within a country,and takes little account of national styles or technology. Aswestern society has developed, vernacular styles have mostly becomeoutmoded by new technology and national building standards. SupportLanguage: - العربية - Deutsch - English - Español - français -italiano - Nederlands - Portuguis
Electrical engineering Books 7.0.0
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Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generallydeals with the study and application of electricity, electronics,and electromagnetism. This field first became an identifiableoccupation in the later half of the 19th century aftercommercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, andelectric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broadcasting andrecording media made electronics part of daily life. The inventionof the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought downthe cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost anyhousehold object. this application contains related attachmentsabout electrical engineering clearly and easily understood. SupportLanguage: - العربية - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى -français - italiano - 日本語 - Nederlands - polski
Biotechnology 6.0.0
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Biotechnology is the use of living systems and organisms to developor make products, or "any technological application that usesbiological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, tomake or modify products or processes for specific use" (UNConvention on Biological Diversity, Art). Depending on the toolsand applications, it often overlaps with the (related) fields ofbioengineering, biomedical engineering, biomanufacturing, molecularengineering, etc. For thousands of years, humankind has usedbiotechnology in agriculture, food production, and medicine. Theterm is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarianengineer Károly Ereky. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries,biotechnology has expanded to include new and diverse sciences suchas genomics, recombinant gene techniques, applied immunology, anddevelopment of pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic tests.Support Language: - العربية - català - Deutsch - English - Español- français - italiano - japanese - polski - Portuguךs
Neuropsychology 6.0.0
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Neuropsychology is the study of the structure and function of thebrain as they relate to specific psychological processes andbehaviours. It is an experimental field of psychology that aims tounderstand how behavior and cognition are influenced by brainfunctioning and is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment ofbehavioral and cognitive effects of neurological disorders. Whereasclassical neurology focuses on the physiology of the nervous systemand classical psychology is largely divorced from it,neuropsychology seeks to discover how the brain correlates with themind. It thus shares concepts and concerns with neuropsychiatry andwith behavioral neurology in general. The term neuropsychology hasbeen applied to lesion studies in humans and animals. It has alsobeen applied in efforts to record electrical activity fromindividual cells (or groups of cells) in higher primates (includingsome studies of human patients). It makes use of neuroscience, andshares an information processing view of the mind with cognitivepsychology and cognitive science. In practice, neuropsychologiststend to work in research settings (universities, laboratories orresearch institutions), clinical settings (medical hospitals orrehabilitation settings, often involved in assessing or treatingpatients with neuropsychological problems), or forensic settings orindustry (often as clinical-trial consultants where CNS function isa concern). Support Language: - العربية - català - Čeština -Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - Bulgarian - français -finland - hungarian - italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk -polski - Português - Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska -Türkçe - українська
A Glossary of literary terms 8.2.3
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This Application following is a list of literary terms; that is,those words used in the discussion, classification, criticism, andanalysis of poetry, novels, and picture books. Support Language: ✔Azərbaycan ✔ English ✔ العربية ✔ հայերեն ✔ Magyar ✔ Galego ✔Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔עִבְרִי ת ✔ Español ✔ italiano ✔ català ✔ 한국어 ✔lietuvių ✔ Deutsch ✔ Norsk ✔ فارْسِى ✔ polski ✔ Português ✔ română✔ Српски ✔ slovenský ✔ slovenski ✔ Türkçe ✔ українська ✔ suomi ✔français ✔ hrvatski ✔ Čeština ✔ Svenska ✔ eesti ✔ 日本語 ✔Euskara✔Indonesia
Book Of Syndromes 6.0.0
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This clearly presented book provides an invaluable reference forhealth professionals working with children. The incidence,characteristics and appropriate management of 277 syndromes andinherited disorders are included, along with the addresses ofparent support groups. Support Languange: ✔Azərbaycan ✔English✔العربية ✔հայերեն ✔ءْëمàًٌêè ✔Magyar ✔Tiếng Việt ✔Galego✔Nederlands ✔إëëçيéêـ ✔Dansk ✔עִבְרִית ✔Espaٌol ✔italiano ✔català✔中文 ✔한국어 ✔Latviešu ✔lietuvių ✔Македонски ✔Deutsch ✔Norsk ✔فارْسِى✔polski ✔Português ✔română ✔ذٌٌَêèé ✔رًïٌêè ✔slovensk‎ ✔slovenski✔ภาษาไทย th ✔Türkçe ✔українська ✔suomi ✔français ✔✔हिन्दी ✔hrvatski✔Čeština ✔Svenska ✔eesti ✔日本語 ✔Euskara ✔Indonesia
List of human genes 7.0.0
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The human genome is the complete set of nucleic acid sequences forhumans, encoded as DNA within the 23 chromosome pairs in cellnuclei and in a small DNA molecule found within individualmitochondria. Human genomes include both protein-coding DNA genesand noncoding DNA. Haploid human genomes, which are contained ingerm cells (the egg and sperm gamete cells created in the meiosisphase of sexual reproduction before fertilization creates a zygote)consist of three billion DNA base pairs, while diploid genomes(found in somatic cells) have twice the DNA content. While thereare significant differences among the genomes of human individuals(on the order of 0.1%),[1] these are considerably smaller than thedifferences between humans and their closest living relatives, thechimpanzees (approximately 4%[2]) and bonobos. Here is a list ofhuman genes classified by chromosome: Support Language: - Deutsch -English - Español - italiano - japanese - Nederland - polski -Portuguךs
Electromagnetism 9.0.0
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Electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of theelectromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occursbetween electrically charged particles. The electromagnetic forceusually exhibits electromagnetic fields such as electric fields,magnetic fields and light, and is one of the four fundamentalinteractions (commonly called forces) in nature. The other threefundamental interactions are the strong interaction, the weakinteraction and gravitation. Lightning is an electrostaticdischarge that travels between two charged regions. The wordelectromagnetism is a compound form of two Greek terms, ἤλεκτρονēlektron, "amber", and μαγνῆτις λίθος magnētis lithos, which means"Μagnesian stone", a type of iron ore. Electromagnetic phenomenaare defined in terms of the electromagnetic force, sometimes calledthe Lorentz force, which includes both electricity and magnetism asdifferent manifestations of the same phenomenon. Theelectromagnetic force plays a major role in determining theinternal properties of most objects encountered in daily life.Ordinary matter takes its form as a result of intermolecular forcesbetween individual atoms and molecules in matter, and is amanifestation of the electromagnetic force. Electrons are bound bythe electromagnetic force to atomic nuclei, and their orbitalshapes and their influence on nearby atoms with their electrons isdescribed by quantum mechanics. The electromagnetic force governsthe processes involved in chemistry, which arise from interactionsbetween the electrons of neighboring atoms. There are numerousmathematical descriptions of the electromagnetic field. Inclassical electrodynamics, electric fields are described aselectric potential and electric current. In Faraday's law, magneticfields are associated with electromagnetic induction and magnetism,and Maxwell's equations describe how electric and magnetic fieldsare generated and altered by each other and by charges andcurrents. Support Language: ✔ English ✔ العربية ✔ Magyar ✔ TiếngViệt ✔ Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔ Espaٌol ✔ italiano ✔ català ✔ japanese✔ korean ✔ lietuvių ✔ Deutsch ✔ Norsk ✔ فارْسِى ✔ polski ✔Português ✔ română ✔ slovensk‎ ✔ slovenski ✔ ภาษาไทย ✔ Türkçe ✔українська ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ finland ✔ हिन्दी" ✔ hrvatski ✔Cestina ✔ Svenska ✔ 日本語 ✔ Euskara ✔ Indonesia
Electrochemistry Books 4.0.0
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Electrochemistry is the branch of physical chemistry that studiesthe relationship between electricity, as a measurable andquantitative phenomenon, and identifiable chemical change, witheither electricity considered an outcome of a particular chemicalchange or vice-versa. These reactions involve electric chargesmoving between electrodes and an electrolyte (or ionic species in asolution). Thus electrochemistry deals with the interaction betweenelectrical energy and chemical change. When a chemical reaction iscaused by an externally supplied current, as in electrolysis, or ifan electric current is produced by a spontaneous chemical reactionas in a battery, it is called an electrochemical reaction. Chemicalreactions where electrons are transferred directly betweenmolecules and/or atoms are called oxidation-reduction or (redox)reactions. In general, electrochemistry describes the overallreactions when individual redox reactions are separate butconnected by an external electric circuit and an interveningelectrolyte. Support Language: ✔العربية ✔català ✔Čeština ✔Deutsch✔English ✔Español ✔فارْسِى ✔français ✔Magyar ✔հայերեն ✔italiano✔日本語 ✔한국어 ✔Nederlands ✔polski ✔Português ✔українська ✔中文
Process engineering 9.0.0
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Process engineering focuses on the design, operation, control,optimization and intensification of chemical, physical, andbiological processes. Process engineering encompasses a vast rangeof industries, such as chemical, petrochemical, agriculture,mineral processing, advanced material, food, pharmaceutical,software development, automotive, and biotechnological industries.The application of systematic computer-based methods to processengineering is "process systems engineering". Support Language: -Deutsch - English - Español - français - italiano - japanese -Nederlands - polski - Portuguךs
Semantics 6.0.0
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Semantics (from Ancient Greek: σημαντικός sēmantikos,"significant")is the linguistic and philosophical study of meaning,in language, programming languages, formal logics, and semiotics.It is concerned with the relationship between signifiers—likewords, phrases, signs, and symbols—and what they stand for, theirdenotation. In international scientific vocabulary, semantics isalso called semasiology. The word semantics was first used byMichel Bréal, a French philologist.It denotes a range of ideas—fromthe popular to the highly technical. It is often used in ordinarylanguage for denoting a problem of understanding that comes down toword selection or connotation. This problem of understanding hasbeen the subject of many formal inquiries, over a long period oftime, especially in the field of formal semantics. In linguistics,it is the study of the interpretation of signs or symbols used inagents or communities within particular circumstances and contexts.Within this view, sounds, facial expressions, body language, andproxemics have semantic (meaningful) content, and each comprisesseveral branches of study. In written language, things likeparagraph structure and punctuation bear semantic content; otherforms of language bear other semantic content. The formal study ofsemantics intersects with many other fields of inquiry, includinglexicology, syntax, pragmatics, etymology, and others.Independently, semantics is also a well-defined field in its ownright, often with synthetic properties. In the philosophy oflanguage, semantics and reference are closely connected. Furtherrelated fields include philology, communication, and semiotics. Theformal study of semantics can, therefore, be manifold and complex.Semantics contrasts with syntax, the study of the combinatorics ofunits of a language (without reference to their meaning), andpragmatics, the study of the relationships between the symbols of alanguage, their meaning, and the users of the language. Semanticsas a field of study also has significant ties to variousrepresentational theories of meaning including truth theories ofmeaning, coherence theories of meaning, and correspondence theoriesof meaning. Each of these is related to the general philosophicalstudy of reality and the representation of meaning. In 1960spsychosemantic studies became popular after Osgood's massivecross-cultural studies using his semantic differential (SD) methodthat used thousands of nouns and adjective bipolar scales. Aspecific form of the SD, Projective Semantics method uses only mostcommon and neutral nouns that correspond to the 7 groups (factors)of adjective-scales most consistently found in cross-culturalstudies (Evaluation, Potency, Activity as found by Osgood, andReality, Organization, Complexity, Limitation as found in otherstudies). In this method, seven groups of bipolar adjective scalescorresponded to seven types of nouns so the method was thought tohave the object-scale symmetry (OSS) between the scales and nounsfor evaluation using these scales. For example, the nounscorresponding to the listed 7 factors would be Beauty, Power,Motion, Life, Work, Chaos, Law. Beauty was expected to be assessedunequivocally as “very good” on adjectives of Evaluation-relatedscales, Life as “very real” on Reality-related scales, etc.However, deviations in this symmetric and very basic matrix mightshow underlying biases of two types: sales-related bias andobjects-related bias. Suport Language: ✔ English ✔ العربية ✔հայերեն ✔ Afrikaans ✔ বাংলা " ✔ Magyar ✔ Tiếng Việt ✔ Galego ✔Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔ עִבְרִית ✔ Español ✔ italiano ✔ katalis ✔ 한국어✔ lietuvių ✔ Melayu ✔ Deutsch ✔ Norsk ✔ فارسى ✔ polski ✔ Português✔ română ✔ Српски ✔ slovenský ✔ slovenski ✔ ภาษา ไทย ✔ தமிழ் " ✔Türkçe ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ हिन्दी " ✔ hrvatski ✔ Čeština ✔ Svenska✔ eesti ✔ 日本語 ✔ malayāḷaṁ ✔ Euskara ✔ indonesia
Astrophysics Books 7.0.0
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The universe through the eyes of an astronomer or astrophysicist isa fascinating place — and a good book can give you a glimpse ofthat world without requiring years of study. Support Language: ✔English ✔ العربية ✔ Afrikaans ✔ Български ✔ Magyar ✔ Tiếng Việt ✔Nederlands ✔ Ελληνικά ✔ Dansk ✔ Español ✔ italiano ✔ català ✔ 中文 ✔한국어 ✔ lietuvių ✔ Deutsch ✔ Norsk ✔ فارْسِى ✔ polski ✔ Português ✔română ✔ Српски ✔ slovenský ✔ slovenski ✔ ภาษาไทย ✔ Türkçe ✔українська ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ हिन्दी" ✔ hrvatski ✔ Čeština ✔Svenska ✔ 日本語 ✔ Euskara ✔ Indonesia
Brain 5.0.0
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The brain is an organ that serves as the center of the nervoussystem in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals. The brainis located in the head, usually close to the sensory organs forsenses such as vision. The brain is the most complex organ in avertebrate's body. In a human, the cerebral cortex containsapproximately 15–33 billion neurons, each connected by synapses toseveral thousand other neurons. These neurons communicate with oneanother by means of long protoplasmic fibers called axons, whichcarry trains of signal pulses called action potentials to distantparts of the brain or body targeting specific recipient cells.Physiologically, the function of the brain is to exert centralizedcontrol over the other organs of the body. The brain acts on therest of the body both by generating patterns of muscle activity andby driving the secretion of chemicals called hormones. Thiscentralized control allows rapid and coordinated responses tochanges in the environment. Some basic types of responsiveness suchas reflexes can be mediated by the spinal cord or peripheralganglia, but sophisticated purposeful control of behavior based oncomplex sensory input requires the information integratingcapabilities of a centralized brain. The operations of individualbrain cells are now understood in considerable detail but the waythey cooperate in ensembles of millions is yet to be solved. Recentmodels in modern neuroscience treat the brain as a biologicalcomputer, very different in mechanism from an electronic computer,but similar in the sense that it acquires information from thesurrounding world, stores it, and processes it in a variety ofways. This article compares the properties of brains across theentire range of animal species, with the greatest attention tovertebrates. It deals with the human brain insofar as it shares theproperties of other brains. The ways in which the human braindiffers from other brains are covered in the human brain article.Several topics that might be covered here are instead covered therebecause much more can be said about them in a human context. Themost important is brain disease and the effects of brain damage,that are covered in the human brain article. Support Language: -العربية - català - Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - eesti -فارْسِى - suomi - français - Magyar - հայերեն - italiano - japanese- ქართული - lietuvių - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs -slovensk‎ - ׁנןסךט - Svenska
Machine learning 5.0.0
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Machine learning is a field of computer science that gives computersystems the ability to "learn" (i.e., progressively improveperformance on a specific task) with data, without being explicitlyprogrammed. The name Machine learning was coined in 1959 by ArthurSamuel. Evolved from the study of pattern recognition andcomputational learning theory in artificial intelligence, machinelearning explores the study and construction of algorithms that canlearn from and make predictions on data – such algorithms overcomefollowing strictly static program instructions by makingdata-driven predictions or decisions, 2 through building a modelfrom sample inputs. Machine learning is employed in a range ofcomputing tasks where designing and programming explicit algorithmswith good performance is difficult or infeasible; exampleapplications include email filtering, detection of networkintruders or malicious insiders working towards a data breach,optical character recognition (OCR), learning to rank, and computervision. Machine learning is closely related to (and often overlapswith) computational statistics, which also focuses onprediction-making through the use of computers. It has strong tiesto mathematical optimization, which delivers methods, theory andapplication domains to the field. Machine learning is sometimesconflated with data mining, where the latter subfield focuses moreon exploratory data analysis and is known as unsupervised learning.vii Machine learning can also be unsupervised and be used to learnand establish baseline behavioral profiles for various entities andthen used to find meaningful anomalies. Within the field of dataanalytics, machine learning is a method used to devise complexmodels and algorithms that lend themselves to prediction; incommercial use, this is known as predictive analytics. Theseanalytical models allow researchers, data scientists, engineers,and analysts to "produce reliable, repeatable decisions andresults" and uncover "hidden insights" through learning fromhistorical relationships and trends in the data. Effective machinelearning is difficult because finding patterns is hard and oftennot enough training data are available as a result,machine-learning programs often fail to deliver.
Quantum Physics 5.0.0
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In physics, a quantum (plural: quanta) is the minimum amount of anyphysical entity involved in an interaction. The fundamental notionthat a physical property may be "quantized" is referred to as "thehypothesis of quantization". This means that the magnitude of thephysical property can take on only discrete values consisting ofinteger multiples of one quantum. For example, a photon is a singlequantum of light (or of any other form of electromagneticradiation), and can be referred to as a "light quantum". Similarly,the energy of an electron bound within an atom is also quantized,and thus can only exist in certain discrete values. Atoms andmatter in general are stable because electrons can only exist atdiscrete energy levels in an atom. Quantization is one of thefoundations of the much broader physics of quantum mechanics.Quantization of the energy and its influence on how energy andmatter interact (quantum electrodynamics) is part of thefundamental framework for understanding and describing nature.Support Language: - العربية - català - Čeština - Deutsch - English- Español - eesti - فارْسِى - suomi - français - Magyar - հայերեն -italiano - japanese - ქართული - lietuvių - Nederlands - Norsk -polski - Portuguis - slovensk‎ - Svenska
Botanical Families 6.0.0
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Botanists have organized the plant world into 'families'. Some ofthe most commonly-encountered wildflower families are listed hereSupport Language: - català - Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español- français - Nederlands - Korean - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs -slovensk‎
Bacteria 9.0.0
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Bacteria common noun bacteria, singular bacterium) constitute alarge domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a fewmicrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, rangingfrom spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria were among the firstlife forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of itshabitats. Bacteria inhabit soil, water, acidic hot springs,radioactive waste, and the deep portions of Earth's crust. Bacteriaalso live in symbiotic and parasitic relationships with plants andanimals. Most bacteria have not been characterised, and only abouthalf of the bacterial phyla have species that can be grown in thelaboratory. The study of bacteria is known as bacteriology, abranch of microbiology. There are typically 40 million bacterialcells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in amillilitre of fresh water. There are approximately 5×1030 bacteriaon Earth, forming a biomass which exceeds that of all plants andanimals. Bacteria are vital in many stages of the nutrient cycle byrecycling nutrients such as the fixation of nitrogen from theatmosphere. The nutrient cycle includes the decomposition of deadbodies and bacteria are responsible for the putrefaction stage inthis process. In the biological communities surroundinghydrothermal vents and cold seeps, extremophile bacteria providethe nutrients needed to sustain life by converting dissolvedcompounds, such as hydrogen sulphide and methane, to energy. InMarch 2013, data reported by researchers in October 2012, waspublished. It was suggested that bacteria thrive in the MarianaTrench, which with a depth of up to 11 kilometres is the deepestknown part of the oceans. Other researchers reported relatedstudies that microbes thrive inside rocks up to 580 metres belowthe sea floor under 2.6 kilometres of ocean off the coast of thenorthwestern United States. According to one of the researchers,"You can find microbes everywhere—they're extremely adaptable toconditions, and survive wherever they are. Support Language: -العربية - català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch - English - Íslenska -Latviešu - lietuvių - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français -Indonesia - italiano - română - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk -polski - Português - Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska -Türkçe - українська - Svenska
Celestial Mechanics 12.0.0
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Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that deals with themotions of celestial objects. Historically, celestial mechanicsapplies principles of physics (classical mechanics) to astronomicalobjects, such as stars and planets, to produce ephemeris data. Asan astronomical field of study, celestial mechanics includes thesub-fields of orbital mechanics (astrodynamics), which deals withthe orbit of an artificial satellite, and lunar theory, which dealswith the orbit of the Moon. Support Language: - العربية - català -Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français- עִבְרִית - Magyar - հայերեն - italiano - japanese - ქართული -lietuvių - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs - slovensk‎ -Svenska
Building material 7.0.0
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his is a List of building materials. Many types of Buildingmaterials are used in the building construction and constructionindustry to create buildings and structures. These categories ofmaterials and products are used by architects and constructionproject managers to specify the materials and methods used forbuilding projects. Some building materials like cold rolled steelframing are considered modern methods of construction, over thetraditionally slower methods like blockwork and timber. Manybuilding materials have a variety of uses, therefore it is always agood idea to consult the manufacturer to check if a product is bestsuited to your requirements. Support Language: ✔ Čeština ✔ Dansk ✔Deutsch ✔ English ✔ Español ✔ italiano ✔ Japanese ✔ korean ✔Nederlands ✔ polski ✔ Português ✔ Svenska
Phonology 10.0.0
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Phonology is a branch of linguistics concerned with the systematicorganization of sounds in languages. It has traditionally focusedlargely on the study of the systems of phonemes in particularlanguages (and therefore used to be also called phonemics, orphonematics), but it may also cover any linguistic analysis eitherat a level beneath the word (including syllable, onset and rime,articulatory gestures, articulatory features, mora, etc.) or at alllevels of language where sound is considered to be structured forconveying linguistic meaning. Support Language: - العربية - català- Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi -français - Magyar - italiano - japanese - ქართული - Nederlands -Norsk - polski - Portuguךs - Svenska
Economic theories 7.0.0
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Economic theories try to explain economic phenomena, to interpretwhy and how the economy behaves and what is the best to solution -how to influence or to solve the economic phenomena. They arecomprehensive system of assumptions, hypotheses, definitions andinstructions what should be done in a certain economic situation.In principle, the approach to economic theory is divided intopositive and normative. Support Language: - العربية - belgium -català - Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - eesti - فارْسِى -français - עִבְרִית - Magyar - հայերեն - italiano - japanese -korean - ქართული - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs -slovensk‎ - Svenska - turki - vietnames
Noxious weeds 9.0.0
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A noxious weed, harmful weed or injurious weed is a weed that hasbeen designated by an agricultural authority as one that isinjurious to agricultural or horticultural crops, natural habitatsor ecosystems, or humans or livestock. Most noxious weeds have beenintroduced into an ecosystem by ignorance, mismanagement, oraccident. Some noxious weeds are native. Typically they are plantsthat grow aggressively, multiply quickly without natural controls(native herbivores, soil chemistry, etc.), and display adverseeffects through contact or ingestion. Noxious weeds are a largeproblem in many parts of the world, greatly affecting areas ofagriculture, forest management, nature reserves, parks and otheropen space. These weeds are typically agricultural pests, thoughmany also have impacts on natural areas. Many noxious weeds havecome to new regions and countries through contaminated shipments offeed and crop seeds or intentional introductions such as ornamentalplants for horticultural use. There is controversy about thedefinition of weed as well as the definition of noxious weed,particularly when it comes to how agricultural interests relate toconservationism. Some "noxious weeds", such as ragwort, producecopious amounts of nectar, valuable for the survival of bees andother pollinators, or other advantages like larval host foods andhabitats. Wild parsnip, Pastinaca sativa, for instance, provideslarge tubular stems that some bee species hibernate in, larval foodfor two different swallowtail butterflies, and other beneficialqualities. One study of restoration meadows using commercial mixesfound that several weeds greatly outperformed, in terms of nectarproduction, the top-performing annual flower planted for meadowrestoration in the meadows studied (cornflower). The bestperformers also quite significantly outperformed the top-performingperennial that wasn't classified as a weed (rough hawkbit). Thefarming practice of using beetle banks may also complicate thenature of dubbing certain plants noxious weeds, due to theirbeneficial qualities in that role. Support Language: ✔ Azərbaycan ✔English ✔ العربية ✔ հայերեն ✔ Magyar ✔ Tiếng Việt ✔ Galego ✔Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔ עִבְרִית ✔ Espanٌol ✔ italiano ✔ català ✔ 中文 ✔한국어 ✔ Latviešu ✔ Македонски ✔ Deutsch ✔ فارْسِى ✔ polski ✔Português ✔ română ✔ slovensk‎ ✔ slovenski ✔ ภาษาไทย th ✔ Türkçe ✔українська ✔ Svenska ✔ eesti ✔ 日本語
Building construction techniques 7.0.0
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Building construction is the process of adding structure to realproperty. The vast majority of building construction projects aresmall renovations, such as addition of a room, or renovation of abathroom. Often, the owner of the property acts as laborer,paymaster, and design team for the entire project. However, allbuilding construction projects include some elements in common -design, financial, and legal considerations. Many projects ofvarying sizes reach undesirable end results, such as structurecollapse, cost overruns, and/or litigation. For this reason, thosewith experience in the field make detailed plans and maintaincareful oversight during the project to ensure a positive outcome.Building construction is procured privately or publicly utilizingvarious delivery methodologies, including hard bid, negotiatedprice, traditional, management contracting, constructionmanagement-at-risk, design & build and design-build bridging.Residential construction practices, technologies, and resourcesmust conform to local building authority regulations and codes ofpractice. Materials readily available in the area generally dictatethe construction materials used (e.g. brick versus stone, versustimber). Cost of construction on a per square metre (or per squarefoot) basis for houses can vary dramatically based on siteconditions, local regulations, economies of scale (custom designedhomes are always more expensive to build) and the availability ofskilled tradespeople. As residential (as well as all other types ofconstruction and manufactured homes) can generate a lot of waste,careful planning again is needed here. The most popular method ofresidential construction in the United States is wood framedconstruction. As efficiency codes have come into effect in recentyears, new construction technologies and methods have emerged.University Construction Management departments are on the cuttingedge of the newest methods of construction intended to improveefficiency, performance and reduce construction waste. SupportLanguage: ✔Čeština ✔Deutsch ✔English ✔Español ✔فارْسِى ✔français✔italiano ✔日本語 ✔한국어 ✔polskipl ✔Português ✔українська
Criminal law 11.0.0
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Criminal law is the body of law that relates to crime. Itproscribes conduct perceived as threatening, harmful, or otherwiseendangering to the property, health, safety, and moral welfare ofpeople. Most criminal law is established by statute, which is tosay that the laws are enacted by a legislature. It includes thepunishment of people who violate these laws. Criminal law variesaccording to jurisdiction, and differs from civil law, whereemphasis is more on dispute resolution and victim compensation thanon punishment. Criminal procedure is formalized official activitythat authenticates the fact of commission of a crime and authorizespunitive treatment of the offender. These are at best coredefinitions; they do not comprehend all legal systems, all stagesin the development of a legal system, or all elements within agiven legal system. Support Language: - العربية - Čeština - Deutsch- English - Español - français - finland - italiano - japanese -korean - Nederlands - Norks - polski - Portuguךs - English -slovenski - Svenska - українська - Svenska
Fluid mechanics 7.0.0
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Fluid mechanics is a branch of physics concerned with the mechanicsof fluids (liquids, gases, and plasmas) and the forces on them.Fluid mechanics has a wide range of applications, includingmechanical engineering, civil engineering, chemical engineering,biomedical engineering, geophysics, astrophysics, and biology.Fluid mechanics can be divided into fluid statics, the study offluids at rest; and fluid dynamics, the study of the effect offorces on fluid motion. It is a branch of continuum mechanics, asubject which models matter without using the information that itis made out of atoms; that is, it models matter from a macroscopicviewpoint rather than from microscopic. Fluid mechanics, especiallyfluid dynamics, is an active field of research with many problemsthat are partly or wholly unsolved. Fluid mechanics can bemathematically complex, and can best be solved by numericalmethods, typically using computers. A modern discipline, calledcomputational fluid dynamics (CFD), is devoted to this approach tosolving fluid mechanics problems. Particle image velocimetry, anexperimental method for visualizing and analyzing fluid flow, alsotakes advantage of the highly visual nature of fluid flow. SupportLanguage: - العربية - català - Čeština - Deutsch - English -Español - eesti - فارْسِى - suomi - français - עִבְרִית - Magyar -հայերեն - italiano - Japanese - Korean - Romania - ქართული -lietuvių - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs - slovensk‎ -ׁנןסךט - Svenska
Sociology terms 8.0.0
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basic Concepts & Terms of Sociology We have explained indetails the various terms and concepts used in Sociology. Check outthe listed terms of sociology for your reference. If there are anyterms commonly used in Sociology and that have not been explainedin our list of Sociology Terms, please write to us and we will addit to the list of terms of sociology for your benefit. After all,it is the basic concepts of any subject that requires clarity andif your basic concepts of Sociology is not clear you are bound toremain unclear with many topics and underperform in yourexamination. Support Language: ✔ Azərbaycan ✔ bahasa inggris ✔العربية ✔ հայերեն ✔ Magyar ✔ Galego ✔ Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔עִבְרִי ת✔ Espaٌol ✔ italiano ✔ Japan ✔ katalis ✔ 한국어 ✔ lietuvių ✔ Deutsch ✔Norsk ✔ فارسى ✔ polski ✔ Português ✔ română ✔ Српски ✔ slovensk‎ ✔slovenski ✔ Türkçe ✔ українська ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ hrvatski ✔Čeština ✔ Svenska ✔ eesti ✔ 日本語 ✔Euskara ✔Indonesia
Vegetable 6.0.0
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In everyday usage, vegetables are certain parts of plants that areconsumed by humans as food as part of a savory meal. Originally,the traditional term (still commonly used in biology) included theflowers, fruit, stems, leaves, roots, tubers, bark, seeds, and allother plant matter, although modern-day culinary usage of the termvegetable may exclude food derived from plants such as fruits,nuts, and cereal grains, but include seeds such as pulses; the termvegetable is somewhat arbitrary, and can be largely defined throughculinary and cultural tradition. Originally, vegetables werecollected from the wild by hunter-gatherers and entered cultivationin several parts of the world, probably during the period 10,000 BCto 7,000 BC, when a new agricultural way of life developed. Atfirst, plants which grew locally would have been cultivated, but astime went on, trade brought exotic crops from elsewhere to add todomestic types. Nowadays, most vegetables are grown all over theworld as climate permits, and crops may be cultivated in protectedenvironments in less suitable locations. China is the largestproducer of vegetables and global trade in agricultural productsallows consumers to purchase vegetables grown in faraway countries.The scale of production varies from subsistence farmers supplyingthe needs of their family for food, to agribusinesses with vastacreages of single-product crops. Depending on the type ofvegetable concerned, harvesting the crop is followed by grading,storing, processing, and marketing. Vegetables can be eaten eitherraw or cooked and play an important role in human nutrition, beingmostly low in fat and carbohydrates, but high in vitamins, mineralsand dietary fiber. Many nutritionists encourage people to consumeplenty of fruit and vegetables, five or more portions a day oftenbeing recommended. Support Language: - العربية - Azerbaijan -català - Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi -français - Magyar - հայերեն - italiano - japanese - ქართული -lietuvių - Nederlands - polski - Portuguךs - slovensk‎ - Svenska -vietnames
Plastic 6.0.0
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Plastic is material consisting of any of a wide range of syntheticor semi-synthetic organic compounds that are malleable and so canbe molded into solid objects. Plasticity is the general property ofall materials which can deform irreversibly without breaking but,in the class of moldable polymers, this occurs to such a degreethat their actual name derives from this specific ability. Plasticsare typically organic polymers of high molecular mass and oftencontain other substances. They are usually synthetic, most commonlyderived from petrochemicals, however, an array of variants are madefrom renewable materials such as polylactic acid from corn orcellulosics from cotton linters. Due to their low cost, ease ofmanufacture, versatility, and imperviousness to water, plastics areused in a multitude of products of different scale, including paperclips and spacecraft. They have prevailed over traditionalmaterials, such as wood, stone, horn and bone, leather, metal,glass, and ceramic, in some products previously left to naturalmaterials. Support Language: - Čeština - Deutsch - English -Español - suomi - français - italiano - japanese - Nederlands -polski - Portuguךs - Svenska
Solar System Book 5.0.0
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The Solar System is an information book that compares and comparesplanets and describes comets, asteroids, and other space featuresin detail and is easy to understand. this book contains 450information about the types of planets, comets, asteroids and otherspace objects with a clear image display so easy to understand foreveryone. Support Language: * Azərbaycan * English * العربية *հայերեն * Беларуская * Български * Magyar * Tiếng Việt * Galego*Belanda * Ελληνικά * Dansk * עִבְרִית * Español * italiano *català * 中文 * 한국어 * Latviešu * lietuvių * Македонски * Deutsch *Norsk * فارسى * polski * Português * română * Русский * Српски *slovenský * slovenski * ภาษา ไทย * Türkçe * українська * suomi *français * हिन्दी * hrvatski * Čeština * Svenska * eesti * 日本語 *Euskara *Indonesia
Dinosaurs 8.0.0
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Dinosaurs are a diverse group of reptiles[note 1] of the cladeDinosauria. They first appeared during the Triassic period, between243 and 231 million years ago, although the exact origin and timingof the evolution of dinosaurs is the subject of active research.They became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates after theTriassic–Jurassic extinction event 201 million years ago; theirdominance continued through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.The fossil record indicates that birds are modern feathereddinosaurs, having evolved from earlier theropods during the lateJurassic Period. As such, birds were the only dinosaur lineage tosurvive the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million yearsago. Dinosaurs can therefore be divided into avian dinosaurs, orbirds; and non-avian dinosaurs, which are all dinosaurs other thanbirds. This article deals primarily with non-avian dinosaurs.Support Language: - African - Azərbaycan - العربية - Magyar -català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch - English - Íslenska - Latviešu- lietuvių - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français - italiano -română - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Português -Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska - Türkçe
Energy 6.0.0
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In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must betransferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat,the object. Energy is a conserved quantity the law of conservationof energy states that energy can be converted in form, but notcreated or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which isthe energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it adistance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms ofenergy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potentialenergy stored by an object's position in a force field(gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored bystretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuelburns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energydue to an object's temperature. Mass and energy are closelyrelated. Due to mass–energy equivalence, any object that has masswhen stationary (called rest mass) also has an equivalent amount ofenergy whose form is called rest energy (in that frame ofreference), and any additional energy (of any form) acquired by theobject above that rest energy will increase the object's total massjust as it increases its total energy. For example, after heatingan object, its increase in energy could be measured as an increasein mass, with a sensitive enough scale. Living organisms requireavailable energy to stay alive, such as the energy humans get fromfood. Human civilization requires energy to function, which it getsfrom energy resources such as fossil fuels, nuclear fuel, orrenewable energy. The processes of Earth's climate and ecosystemare driven by the radiant energy Earth receives from the sun andthe geothermal energy contained within the earth. Support Language:- العربية - Magyar - català - Čeština - Dansk - Deutsch - English -lietuvių - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français - Indonesia -italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Português -Türkçe - vietname
Perennial Herb Gardens 6.0.0
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Like all plants, herbs can be either annuals, biennials orperennials. Perennial herbs are among the most popular herbs forherb gardeners, since they grow for several years, giving you acontinuous harvest for your kitchen. Many can be dried or frozenfor winter use, when the plants have either died back for theseason or are covered with snow, awaiting spring's warmth to onceagain bring them to life. Plant your perennial herbs in their owngarden space near the back door where they are in easy reach forcooking. You'll also love their aroma on a hot summer day whentheir fragrant oils disperse. It is possible to grow them incontainers, but most perennial herbs prefer a permanent position inthe garden. Judge how you plant them by checking their hardiness.Thyme and sage are very hardy, for example, while your rosemarybush just won't tolerate much cold weather. Support Language: -català - Deutsch - English - Español - français - finland -italiano - lietuvių - Nederlands - polski - Portuguךs - Svenska -vietnames
Internal Parts Of Cars 5.0.0
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A car is a complex machine with several systems functioningsimultaneously. While most modern cars contain computerized systemsthat are beyond the understanding of all but the most specializedtechnicians, knowing the basic parts of a car and how they functionmakes it easier to spot problems, perform basic repairs and drivemore responsibly. The app contains 140 inside information of thecar. Support language: - العربية - català - Čeština - Dansk -Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français -Indonesia - italiano - 日本語 - 한국어 - Nederlands - Norsk - Português -Русский - slovenský - slovenski - Svenska - Türkçe - українська
Butterfly 6.0.0
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Butterflies are insects in the macrolepidopteran clade Rhopalocerafrom the order Lepidoptera, which also includes moths. Adultbutterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, andconspicuous, fluttering flight. The group comprises the largesuperfamily Papilionoidea, which contains at least one formergroup, the skippers (formerly the superfamily "Hesperioidea") andthe most recent analyses suggest it also contains themoth-butterflies (formerly the superfamily "Hedyloidea"). Butterflyfossils date to the Paleocene, which was about 56 million yearsago. Butterflies have the typical four-stage insect life cycle.Winged adults lay eggs on the food plant on which their larvae,known as caterpillars, will feed. The caterpillars grow, sometimesvery rapidly, and when fully developed, pupate in a chrysalis. Whenmetamorphosis is complete, the pupal skin splits, the adult insectclimbs out, and after its wings have expanded and dried, it fliesoff. Some butterflies, especially in the tropics, have severalgenerations in a year, while others have a single generation, and afew in cold locations may take several years to pass through theirentire life cycle. Butterflies are often polymorphic, and manyspecies make use of camouflage, mimicry and aposematism to evadetheir predators. Some, like the monarch and the painted lady,migrate over long distances. Many butterflies are attacked byparasites or parasitoids, including wasps, protozoans, flies, andother invertebrates, or are preyed upon by other organisms. Somespecies are pests because in their larval stages they can damagedomestic crops or trees; other species are agents of pollination ofsome plants. Larvae of a few butterflies (e.g., harvesters) eatharmful insects, and a few are predators of ants, while others liveas mutualists in association with ants. Culturally, butterflies area popular motif in the visual and literary arts. Support Language:- català - Čeština - Deutsch - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi- français - Magyar - italiano - japanese - lietuvių - Nederlands -Norsk - polski - Portuguךs
economic indicator 7.0.0
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An economic indicator is a statistic about an economic activity.Economic indicators allow analysis of economic performance andpredictions of future performance. One application of economicindicators is the study of business cycles. Economic indicatorsinclude various indices, earnings reports, and economic summaries:for example, the unemployment rate, quits rate (quit rate in U.S.English), housing starts, consumer price index (a measure forinflation), consumer leverage ratio, industrial production,bankruptcies, gross domestic product, broadband internetpenetration, retail sales, stock market prices, and money supplychanges. The leading business cycle dating committee in the UnitedStates of America is the National Bureau of Economic Research(private). The Bureau of Labor Statistics is the principalfact-finding agency for the U.S. government in the field of laboreconomics and statistics. Other producers of economic indicatorsincludes the United States Census Bureau and United States Bureauof Economic Analysis. Support Language: - Deutsch - English -Español - français - italiano - japanese - Nederlands - polski -Portuguךs
Archaeological terminology 6.0.0
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Pages in category "Archaeological terminology" The following 21pages are in this category, out of 21 total. This list may notreflect recent changes (learn more). Glossary of archaeologyAcropolis Agora Amphora Anthropic units Artifact (archaeology)Assemblage (archaeology) Association (archaeology) Cradle ofcivilization Disjecta membra First city Flotation (archaeology)Foundation deposit Glyph Holocene calendar Occupation earthPorticus Proto-city Provenience Virtual archaeology Waterlogging(archaeology) Support Language: - العربية - català - Čeština -Deutsch - Dansk - English - Español - فارْسِى - suomi - français -Magyar - հայերեն - italiano - japanese - ქართული - lietuvių -Nederlands - Norsk - polski - Portuguךs - slovensk‎
Glossary of economics 5.0.0
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Most of the terms used in dictionary glossaries are already definedand explained within dictionary itself. However, lists like thefollowing indicate where new articles need to be written and arealso useful for looking up and comparing large numbers of termstogether. This glossary is also incomplete; you can help by writingdefinitions for existing terms or expanding it. You can also helpby adding illustrations that assist in the understanding of theterms. This glossary of economics is a list of definitions abouteconomics, its sub-disciplines, and related fields. SupportLanguage: ✔ Azərbaycan ✔ English ✔ العربية ✔ հայերեն ✔ ءْëمàًٌêè ✔Magyar ✔ Galego ✔ Nederlands ✔ Dansk ✔עִבְרִי ת ✔ Español ✔italiano ✔ català ✔ 한국어 ✔ lietuvių ✔ Deutsch ✔ Norsk ✔ فارْسِى ✔polski ✔ Português ✔ română ✔ Српски ✔ slovenský ✔ slovenski ✔Türkçe ✔ українська ✔ suomi ✔ français ✔ hrvatski ✔ Čeština ✔Svenska ✔ eesti ✔ 日本語 ✔Euskara ✔Indonesia