LucidMobile Apps

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Rice Doctor 1.0.10
LucidMobile
Rice Doctor is an interactive tool for extension workers, students,researchers and other users who want to learn and diagnose pest,disease, and other problems that can occur in rice; and how tomanage them.This product has been developed by an internationalteam involving –• International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)•Lucid team at the University of Queensland, Australia• PhilippineRice Research Institute (PhilRice), Philippines• Research Institutefor Rice, Indonesia The Australian Centre for InternationalAgricultural Research (ACIAR) has contributed funding for theresearch, development, and production of this product.Thisinteractive tool allows users to diagnose or at least make a shortlist of possible problems occurring in a rice crop. The key coversover 90 pests and diseases and other disorders. The combination oftext descriptions and images helps users in the process ofdiagnosing their problems. Fact sheets on each possible disorderprovide brief descriptions of the signs and symptoms of specificproblems, together with details of any available managementoptions. A keyword search function enables users to directly accessspecific fact sheets. For further information on these disorders,users can link to full fact sheets on the IRRI Rice Knowledge Bankwebsite.This app is powered by Lucid Mobile.
FunKey: Key to Agarics 1.0.7
LucidMobile
FunKey: Key to Agarics of Australia is an interactive key to thegenera and selected species of Australian agarics. The agarics,also known as mushrooms and toadstools, are not a taxonomic unit,but rather a group of convenience for macrofungi with lamellae(gills).The key covers the 112 agaric genera that are confirmedfrom Australia and utilises 115 macroscopic and microscopiccharacters (called features in the key). About half the genera arekeyed out directly, some are split into two or more groups, and ingenera with one or a few closely related species, the species orspecies group is keyed out directly. This means that FunKeyincludes a total of 159 taxa (called entities in the key).Poisonousand Edible FungiAmong the agarics are edible fungi such as FieldMushroom Agaricus campestris and Pine mushroom Lactariusdeliciosus, but also poisonous species such as Yellow-stainingmushroom Agaricus xanthodermus and the Death cap Amanita phalloides(consumption of which has caused fatalities in Australia).We do notprovide any information on toxicity or edibility in relation togenera or to species in FunKey.The only safe way to consume wildfungi is to be certain of the identification of the particularspecies and to seek information on edibility or otherwise fromreputable sources. Be aware that many species of edible fungi havereadily confusable look-a-likes, such the toxic Ghost fungusOmphalotus nidiformis for the cultivated Oyster mushroom Pleurotusostreatus and the two species of Agaricus mentioned above. Notealso that some genera contain a mix of toxic and edible species.The edibility of most native Australian fungi is unknown; indeed,many species are not yet formally named, and Australian fieldguides do not include all species (named or not).License Agreement(EULA): http://www.lucidcentral.org/licenses/lucid_mobile/
Insect Orders 1.0.9
LucidMobile
Insects make up the vast bulk of species diversity on the planet.Many millions of insect species exist and entomologists havedivided them into a manageable number of units called Orders. Themembers of each insect Order have arisen from a common ancestor,share similar structural characteristics and have certainbiological attributes in common.Not all insect Orders are equal inspecies number; some Orders have just a few hundred species whileothers have more than 100,000 species. The range of structuralcharacteristics and biological features tends to be broader in themore species-rich Orders.Predictions about the biology, behaviourand ecology of an insect can be made once you know its Order. Buthow can you know the Order to which an insect belongs? Insects canbe identified in various ways. Comparing a specimen with a book ofillustrations of identified insects is one way. Using a printed keyis another way. This Lucid based key combines the advantages ofthese methods and adds a new dimension of simplicity and power tothe process of identification.This simple identification key isdesigned to identify most common adult insects to Order inAustralia. The key has been designed for use by advanced secondarystudents, beginning undergraduates and others interested inentomology. We have written the key so that students will learnabout the structure and biology of insects while identifying them.We have included three groups of arthropods in this key (Protura,Collembola and Diplura) that are closely related to insects.How canyou tell if an insect is an adult and can be identified using thiskey? That is a simple question without a simple answer. If yourinsect has fully-developed, functional wings then it is an adult.However, some adult insects have reduced, non-functional wings andothers have no wings at all. In these cases the adult forms havefully developed genitalia at the apex of the abdomen.The 'Key toInsect Orders' was created at the University of Queensland,Department of Entomology. The Key has been based on the simplifiedkeys to insect Orders found in Collecting, Preserving andClassifying Insects by E.C. Dahms, G.B. Monteith and S. Monteith(Queensland Museum, 1979), Worms to Wasps by M.S. Harvey and A.L.Yen (Oxford University Press, 1989) and A Field Guide to Insects inAustralia by P. Zborowski and R. Storey (Reed Books, 1995).This appis powered by Lucid Mobile.
Rare Plants of the Pilbara 1.0.4
LucidMobile
Rare and Priority Plants of the Pilbara is a field guide andidentification tool for the 167 Threatened and Priority flora knownfrom the Pilbara bioregion, including species not yet recorded fromthe region but likely to be found there. In addition to those thathave been scientifically named, it also covers taxa that have notyet been named and are listed on the Census of Western AustralianPlants under phrase names. It includes all species currently listedas conservation taxa by the Department of Parks andWildlife.Developed as a collaborative project between Rio TintoAustralia and the Western Australian Herbarium, Rare and PriorityPlants of the Pilbara provides the most comprehensive andup-to-date information available on these rare and importantplants, and will provide a useful guide for environmentalconsultants, botanists, industry environmental officers,conservation planners and others with a need to understand theflora of the Pilbara.Each species is represented by a profile pageincluding vernacular name, a botanical description, spottingfeatures, and notes on ecology and distribution. All species areillustrated with the best available images, and currentdistribution is mapped. Species profiles can be accessed by taxonname and filtered by botanical family or using simple features suchas habit, flower colour and habitat.Note that Rare and PriorityPlants of the Pilbara is not a complete identification key to theplants of the Pilbara. In some cases, rare taxa may look similar tocommon ones; nevertheless, by carefully comparing a specimen withthe information provided, including the images, distribution mapand botanical description, most species should be able to bediscriminated accurately and effectively.All information ispackaged in the app, allowing Rare and Priority Plants of thePilbara to be used in the field in remote localities without webconnections. This means that the app is a large download; dependingon connection speed, it may take several minutes to download.
Citrus ID 1.0.7
LucidMobile
Citrus pests and diseases may be found on a number of plant speciesin various plant families. The Citrus ID Key is primarily intendedto help people working or conducting pest surveys in citrusorchards, variety collections, and home gardens, so its focus islimited exclusively to the citrus family (Rutaceae). Although eightgenera of Rutaceae are native to the continental United States(Amyris, Choisya, Cneoridium, Esenbeckia, Helietta, Ptelea,Thamnosma, and Zanthoxylum), most of these are unlikely to beencountered in our target locations and can be keyed using regionalguides. The cultivars and taxa of citrus and relatives that havebeen introduced and released for cultivation are the most likely tobe encountered in cultivated settings, so the Citrus ID Keyconcentrates on these taxa.Cultivars of citrus and its relativesare released in the United States through state agencies and to alesser extent the USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository forCitrus & Dates. Our target list of entities was synthesizedfrom the cultivar lists provided by the California Citrus ClonalProtection Program, the Florida Citrus Arboretum, the FloridaChiefland Budwood Distribution Center, the Florida Bureau of CitrusBudwood Registration, and the Texas Budwood Certification Program.Arizona no longer certifies budwood, instead relying on theCalifornia program. The resulting target list includes over 500entities of citrus and relatives cultivated in the UnitedStates.Field identification to the level of cultivar remainsimpossible in most cases. This is partially due to the complicatedreticulate breeding history of citrus, but also, selection hasgenerally focused on characters such as taste, disease and stressresistance, and fruiting phenology rather than on characters ofornamental (and thus morphological) value. This key facilitatesidentification to at least the cultivar group level within citrus(e.g., sweet oranges, sour oranges, etc.), if not beyond for selectcultivars.Original illustrations and photography: Unlessspecifically indicated otherwise, the source for plant imagesincluded in Citrus ID Key should be cited as "Herbarium (NCSC)."NCSC is the official abbreviation for the North Carolina StateUniversity Herbarium. Any commercial use is prohibited withoutexpress written permission. Requests may be addressed to:Herbarium, Department of Plant Biology, North Carolina StateUniversity, Raleigh, NC 27695-7612.Original source for Lucid MobileKey: Saville, A.C., A. Krings, T. Kahn, M.D. Trice, and A.J.Redford. 2011. Citrus ID, Edition 2. USDA APHIS ITP, Fort Collinsand North Carolina State University.http://idtools.org/id/citrus/citrusid/Key authors: Amanda Saville,Alexander Krings, Tracy Kahn, Matthew Trice, and Amanda Redford
Environmental Weeds Australia 1.0.10
LucidMobile
Environmental Weeds of Australia is now available as an ID App! Itis based on an updated edition of the popular CD version andincludes the full identification key, weed fact sheets, and over10,000 images right on your smart device. Please note this is alarge download (272M) and depending on your connection may takeseveral minutes to download and install. An internet connection isnot required once installed. Environmental Weeds of Australia hasbeen developed to assist with the identification of weed speciesthat invade natural habitats. It is a valuable resource for allthose concerned about environmental weeds: weed and biodiversityresearchers, trainers, advisors, weed control officers,environmental community groups, weed management practitioners, andanyone with an interest in environmental weeds.While Australianfocused, this key provides an excellent resource to users in othercountries. Both plain English and botanical terms (usually inbrackets) are used throughout the App to make it applicable to aswide an audience as possible. At the core of this App is aninteractive Lucid identification key to 1020 plant species that areeither significant or emerging environmental weeds in Australia. Tohelp confirm the identification of weed species the app providesover 10,000 photos and a wealth of information on each weed speciesand how to distinguish between very similar species. In many cases,links are provided to websites that have relevant information aboutthe management of specific weed species.
Federal Noxious Weeds Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Officials in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)have determined that certain species not native to the U.S. are atrisk of becoming invasive should they enter this country. As partof its effort to prevent the introduction of invasive orpotentially invasive weeds, the USDA maintains an official list of"federal noxious weeds" (FNW) (7 CFR 360.200 and 361.6). Many taxaon this list are currently serious weeds elsewhere in the world,and about two-thirds of the taxa are currently found in the U.S.Most of the FNW taxa are angiosperms, but a few are ferns and oneis a green alga. NOTE that the ferns and alga are not included inthis app.Fruits and seeds are the plant disseminules mostresponsible for the spread of weeds to new regions. Federal NoxiousWeed Disseminules of the U.S. Keys was developed to enable accurateidentification of FNW angiosperm disseminules. The three keys(Grasses=Poaceae; Legumes=Fabaceae; and Other Angiosperm PlantFamilies) were designed to be used by officials at U.S. portsresponsible for identification of plant pests. It may also be auseful resource for seed professionals and anyone else with aninterest in, or a need to know about, noxious weeddisseminules.Thirty-one families are currently represented on theFNW list as of 2013. Most of the taxa are individual species, buttwo are species complexes, Rubus fruticosus L. agg. and Salviniaauriculata complex (not included in the app key since an aquaticferm), and one is an infraspecific taxon (Setaria pumila (Poir.)Roem. & Schult. ssp. pallidefusca (Schumach) B. K. Simon). Notethat fact sheets for the FNW species of six genera Aeginetia,Alectra, Cuscuta, Moraea, Orobanche, Striga have been treatedtogether in their own "genus-level" fact sheets.The threeinteractive family keys include only those FNW taxa that produceseed and fruit disseminules (i.e., angiosperms). Eight taxa are notincluded in the interactive keys either because they lackangiosperm sexual reproduction altogether or they produce seed onlyrarely. One group lacking fruits and seeds are the ferns, whichreproduce via spores as well as by vegetative means. Reproductionvia vegetative disseminules is the primary means of dispersal forsome non-ferns (three angiosperms and an alga) as well. The eighttaxa not in the keys are the terrestial ferns Lygodium flexuosum(L.) Sw. and Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br., the aquatic fernsAzolla pinnata R.Br. and the Salvinia auriculata complex, theaquatic angiosperms Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle andLagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss, the sterile angiosperm hybridOpuntia aurantiaca Lindl., and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia (Vahl)Agardh.All photographic images were produced by the authors exceptwhere acknowledged in image captions. See FNW tool for properguidelines for use and citation of images. The majority of originalillustrations were drawn by Lesley Randall. The remainder weredrawn by Ingrid Hogle and Julia Scher. Drawings by Lynda E.Chandler are from Gunn and Ritchie (1988). Drawings by Regina O.Hughes are from Terrell and Peterson (1993) and Reed (1977).Keyauthors: Julia Scher and Deena WaltersThis key is part of acomplete FNW tool: http://itp.lucidcentral.org/id/fnw/Lucid Mobilekey developed by USDA APHIS ITP
Palm ID Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Palm ID Key is designed to help users identify cultivated palms.The ability to identify a palm host is an important aid to pest anddisease identification, as many diseases and pests may be hostspecific. Palm ID Key supports users that may only have a portionof a complete representative sample of a plant. This key allowsusers to identify many specimens to species, though this is notpossible in all cases, as many palms are capable of hybridizing.Theintended audience for this key is non-experts working in the fieldwithin Cooperative Agriculture Pest Survey (CAPS), National PlantDiagnostic Network (NPDN), and other national, regional, and stateagricultural agencies/organizations with responsibilitiesassociated with pest and disease survey and detection. However, thekey will be useful for anyone who manages palms in a nursery orlandscape setting. All features in the key can be used with thenaked eye or a hand lens.Information is provided for 82 commonlycultivated palm species from 48 genera, but given the difficulty ofseparating palm species and the number of hybrids among them, youmight only be able to determine the genus for a particular palm.Only adult palms (not seedlings or pre-reproductive juvenile palms)are included in the key and descriptions. The key is illustratedwith hundreds of images of species and their characteristics orfeatures. This key provides identification support for palms thatare commonly cultivated, as of 2010, in the United States(continental U.S. and Hawaii) and Caribbean Islands.Mary Andrewscontributed the image for the splash page. All otheracknowledgements are available at the URL shown below.Key author:Patti AndersonThis key is part of a complete Identifying CommonlyCultivated Palms tool : http://idtools.org/id/palms/palm-id/LucidMobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP
Weeds of South East QLD and Northern NSW 1.1.6
LucidMobile
Weeds of South-East Queensland and Northern NSW is anidentification and information tool covering suburban, rural,environmental and agricultural weeds. It is an invaluable resourceused by gardeners, Landcare and Bushcare volunteers, weed controlofficers, ecologists, agronomists, researchers, students, andothers interested in learning more about the weeds found inSouth-East Queensland and Northern New South Wales.The originalLucid identification key was released on CD-ROM over 12 years ago.The latest version using the Lucid Mobile platform now includes:*An identification key to over 700 weed species found inSouth-Eastern Queensland and Northern New South Wales.* A bestpractices guide to identifying weed species using the key* Factsheets with in-depth descriptions of specific weeds* Over 8,000colour photographs of weeds and diagnostic features* Informationabout plants suitable for replacing weeds* Details of Prohibitedand Restricted weeds in Queensland* Glossary of commonly usedbotanical terms* Report invasive weeds to your local council -coming soon!We thank the following Queensland councils for theirsupport of the development of this app, updating the content, andhelping make the app freely available:Brisbane City CouncilSunshineCoast CouncilGold Coast City CouncilBundaberg Regional CouncilThelatest version of the app has a much reduced storage footprint,images used in the identification tool are downloaded as required,with the option to download images to your device for use offlineor when using the app with poor network connectivity.
Terrestrial Mollusc Key 1.0.7
LucidMobile
The Terrestrial Mollusc Key was specifically designed to assist inthe identification of adult terrestrial slugs and snails ofagricultural importance. The key also includes species ofquarantine significance as well as invasive and contaminant molluscspecies commonly intercepted at U.S. ports of entry. This key isdesigned for federal, state and other agencies or organizationswithin the U.S. that are concerned with the detection andidentification of molluscs of significance. This key includes 33families and 128 species. It should be noted that this key is notinclusive of all mollusc pests, as new species of interest arisealmost daily.The list of species included in this tool wasgenerated based on pest species reported in scholarly publicationsby Barker 2002, Cowie et al. 2009, and Godan 1983 as well ascommonly intercepted species documented in the port of entryinterception data from US Department of Agriculture, Animal andPlant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantinedivision (USDA-APHIS-PPQ) and the Florida Department of Agricultureand Consumer Services (FDACS) -Division of Plant Industry.The keyis unable to identify a few entities below the family level. Thisis true especially for the families Veronicellidae and Succineidae.The major reason for this is the lack of diagnostic morphologicalcharacters and the variability of members of these groups. In manycases, it is recommended that molecular techniques be used in theidentification of members of these families (Holland and Cowie2007; Gomes et al. 2010). This inadequacy of the key is, however,mitigated by the fact that most if not all members of theseproblematic groups are pestiferous and as such are regulated at thefamily level. The same is true for the species complexes (e.g.,Arion hortensis group, A. ater group) included in the tool.TheTerrestrial Mollusc Key was developed and published by the Centerfor Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST) as part of acooperative agreement with the Department of Entomology andNematology, University of Florida and the United States Departmentof Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service(APHIS), Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) and is under thedirection of Terrence Walters, CPHST Identification TechnologyProgram (ITP) coordinator.The photographs utilized in this key weregenerously provided by those credited on each. The photographersand organizations that gave permission to use their images are alsocredited in the acknowledgements of the original tool(http://idtools.org/id/mollusc/). All drawings were produced by theUniversity of Florida, unless otherwise noted.Author: JodiWhite-McLean (Department of Entomology and Nematology, Universityof Florida)Editors and Advisors: John Capinera (Department ofEntomology and Nematology, University of Florida) and JohnSlapcinsky (Florida Museum of Natural History, University ofFlorida)Original Illustrations and Photography: Kay Weigel and LyleBuss (Department of Entomology and Nematology, University ofFlorida)Lucid Mobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP
Palm Symptoms Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Palm Symptoms Key is designed to help users make a preliminaryfield diagnosis of a palm problem. Since many diseases, disorders,and insect pests can cause similar symptoms, this key will oftenlead to more than one possible field diagnosis. Consulting the factsheets may help to narrow down the diagnosis to a single cause. Fordefinitive confirmation of diseases and insects, the appropriatetissue samples or insect specimens should be sent to an expert forverification.This key is based solely on visual symptoms for twoprimary reasons. First, visual symptoms are sufficient to diagnosemany palm problems, especially physiological disorders such asnutrient deficiencies. Second, visual symptoms are the first stepin determining which diagnostic lab to use for further analysis andwhich tissue should be sampled for analysis. Many times, diagnosisof a palm problem is a multi-step procedure whereby possible causesof the problem are ruled out, one at a time. Never rely on alaboratory diagnosis without also making a good faith attempt atthe visual diagnosis. The two diagnoses should agree. Just becausea laboratory report suggests deficiencies of one or more nutrientelements or the presence of one or more potential pathogens doesnot mean that those deficiencies or pathogens are the actual causeof the particular problem. False positives are common, and oftenmisleading. This is one weakness of laboratory diagnostics whenused as the sole method of diagnosis. In the case of palm diseases,false negatives are also a common problem, especially when thewrong tissue is sampled or a sample of poor quality is submitted tothe laboratory. If the two diagnoses (visual and lab) do not agree,then re-examine the problem to determine which diagnosis is morelikely to explain the symptoms being observed (compare todescriptions and photos in the fact sheets), and if you sampled thecorrect material for the laboratory diagnosis. Alternatively, youmay need to start at the beginning as neither diagnosis may becorrect.The intended audience for this key is non-experts workingin the field within Cooperative Agriculture Pest Survey (CAPS),National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), and other national,regional, and state agricultural agencies/organizations withresponsibilities associated with pest and disease survey anddetection. However, the key will be useful for anyone who managespalms in a nursery or landscape setting. All features in the keycan be used with the naked eye or a hand lens.Mary Andrewscontributed the image for the splash page. All otheracknowledgements are available at the URL shown below.Key authors:Timothy K. Broschat, Monica L. Elliott, and Ian MaguireThis key ispart of a complete Symptoms of Palm Diseases and Disorders tool:http://idtools.org/id/palms/symptoms/Lucid Mobile key developed byUSDA APHIS ITP
Malaria Vectors 1.0.0
LucidMobile
We present illustrated identification keys to the adult femalemosquitoes belonging to subfamily Anophelinae. Almost all are ingenus Anopheles, which worldwide is the only mosquito genus thattransmits human malaria. Among the approximately 40 describedspecies in Central America about 25% are known to be efficientvectors of malaria, but others are suspected (see* below). Threebiogeographical regions are represented here in “Central America.”The fauna of northern Mexico is very similar to southern NorthAmerica, and that of eastern Panama is very similar to northernSouth America. Since there remain many unanswered questions aboutthe identities of many South American species the keys presentedhere will not necessarily work for eastern Panama. This key isbased on Wilkerson and Strickman, 1990 (Journal of the AmericanMosquito Control Association, vol. 6: 7-34) who used publishedliterature and original observations. In addition to morphology,country of occurrence has been used as a character inidentification. Actual specimens, and often type material, wereexamined for nearly all the species. Literature used here includes:Faran, 1980, Albimanus Section of subgenus Nyssorhynchus(Contributions of the American Entomological Institute, vol. 15:1-215.); Linthicum, 1988, Argyritarsis Section of subgenusNyssorhynchus (Mosquito Systematics, vol. 20: 99-271); Zavortink,1970, treehole Anopheles (Contributions of the AmericanEntomological Institute, vol. 5: 1-35); Zavortink, 1973, subgenusKerteszia (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute,vol. 9: 1-54; and, Floore et al., 1976, Crucians Subgroup ofsubgenus Anopheles (Mosquito Systematics 8: 1-109). This key isdesigned to be used with a magnification device, preferably adissection microscope with good illumination. An introduction tothe process of identifying mosquitoes with diagnostic keys and aprimer on mosquito taxonomy can be found athttp://www.wrbu.org/tut/keys_tut00.html.Institutional support forthis work was provided by the Walter Reed Army Institute ofResearch, Entomology Branch, the Smithsonian Institution, NationalMuseum of Natural History, Department of Entomology, and the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (Mosquito Species Diversity andLandscape Change. Amendment to agreement # DW-33-92296801).Photographs and illustrations by Judith Stoffer, and assistancewith the mobile key version by Desmond Foley. The opinions andassertions contained herein are those of the authors and are not tobe construed as official or reflecting the views of the Departmentof the Army or the Department of Defense.*Significant malariavectors found in Central AmericaAnopheles (Anopheles) freeborniAn.(Ano.) Quadrimaculatus ComplexAn. (Ano.) pseudopunctipennisAn.(Ano.) punctimaculaAn. (Kerteszia) pholidotusAn. (Nyssorhynchus)albimanusAn. (Nys.) Albitarsis Complex (marajoara)An. (Nys.)aquasalisAn. (Nys.) darlingiAuthors:Richard WilkersonDanielStrickmanPhotographs by Judith StofferHow to cite thekey:Wilkerson, R.C. and D. Strickman. 2014. Lucid identificationkey to adult female anophelines of Central America. Walter ReedBiosystematics Unit, Smithsonian Institution. Washington DC.
Sweetpotato DiagNotes 1.1.1
LucidMobile
Sweetpotato DiagNotes is an interactive tool for extension workers,students, researchers and others who want to learn about the crop;about the pest, disease and other problems that can occur; how todiagnose crop symptoms and what management practices can be used todeal with sweetpotato disorders. This product has been developed byan international team involving: - The School for Land and FoodSciences and The Centre for Biological Information Technology, bothat The University of Queensland - PhilRootcrops, at Leyte StateUniversity in the Philippines - The International Potato Center(CIP) and - A number of other, international collaborators. TheAustralian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)funded the research, development and production of this product.The interactive (Lucid) key contained in this product allows usersto diagnose or at least make a short list of possible problemsoccurring in a sweetpotato crop. The key covers over 80 sweetpotatoinsect and mite pests, nematodes, diseases, nutrient and otherdisorders. The combination of text descriptions and over 700 imageshelps users in the process of diagnosing their problems. Extensivenotes are available on the signs and symptoms about each of thespecific problems while making a diagnosis. Full fact sheets arealso provided for each problem, giving further information on suchtopics as taxonomy, economic importance, geographical distribution,biology and ecology, and management.
Grasshoppers of the Western US 1.1.3
LucidMobile
The Grasshoppers of the Western U.S. Lucid mobile app offers keysto identify both adult and pre-adult stages of many of the mostcommonly encountered grasshoppers in the western U.S. The adult keyfacilitates the identification of 76 species of adult grasshoppers.All species included are in the family Acrididae with the exceptionof one, Brachystola magna, which is in the family Romaleidae. Seethe keys page if you need help determining whether your specimen isan adult or a nymph. The Lucid mobile keys were created byUSDA-APHIS-ITP through collaboration with theUSDA-APHIS-PPQ-S&T CPHST Phoenix Lab, USDA-APHIS-PPQ ColoradoSPHD Office, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Chadron StateCollege, and Identic Pty Ltd (Lucid).The keys are designed forpeople with varying degrees of knowledge identifying rangelandgrasshoppers, from the general enthusiast to research scientist.The species fact sheets include photos and drawings by Dr. RobertPfadt from the University of Wyoming with additional photos byMathew L. Brust from Chadron State College.Key authors: MathewBrust, Jim Thurman, Chris Reuter, Lonnie Black, Robert Quartarone,and Amanda Redford.This Lucid mobile app is part of a completeidentification tool released in 2014: Brust, Mathew, Jim Thurman,Chris Reuter, Lonnie Black, Robert Quartarone, and Amanda Redford.Grasshoppers of the Western U.S., Edition 4. USDA-APHIS-ITP. FortCollins, Colorado.Mobile app updated on February 2016.
Pest Thrips of East Africa 1.0.1
LucidMobile
Thrips (Order: Thysanoptera) are key pests of staples and highvalue horticultural crops worldwide. They inflict substantialqualitative and quantitative losses due to their feeding,transmission of tospoviruses and quarantine relevance. Their smallsize, cryptic feeding behaviour and diverse character states ofnearly 6000 recognized thrips species constrain their detection andidentification during phytosanitary inspections.This user-friendlytool aims to address this constraint and improve thrips detectionand identification.
NZ Orchid Key 1.0.3
LucidMobile
This free app covers a vast array of plant characters foridentifying native orchids, including leaves, flowers, habitats,and distribution.There are 120–160 species of native orchids in NewZealand, including those that don’t yet have formal botanicalnames. Native orchids have high conservation values and should notbe removed from the wild.Key authors: Murray Dawson, Jeremy Rolfe,Kathleen Stewart, Jenny Dent, and Michael Pratt.We thank members ofthe New Zealand Native Orchid Group(http://www.nativeorchids.co.nz) and the NatureWatch NZ project(http://naturewatch.org.nz/projects/new-zealand-native-orchids) forcontributing images to this key.The New Zealand TFBIS (Terrestrial& Freshwater Biodiversity Information System) Programme fundedcreation of this app.This LucidMobile key is part of a series offree interactive keys for identifying New Zealand native andnaturalised plants. Online versions are hosted by Landcare Research(http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/plants).Thisapp is powered by Lucid Mobile.
NZ Coprosma Key 1.0.1
LucidMobile
This free app is for the identification of coprosmas, a large genusof native New Zealand woody plants.It was created to help identifyplants during ecological survey work, but will also be useful tostudents, researchers, and others in the New Zealand botanicalcommunity. A hand lens (10–20×) or dissecting microscope will beneeded to see hairs on leaves and stems that are used foridentification.Key authors: David Glenny, Jane Cruikshank, JeremyRolfe, and Chris Morse.The New Zealand TFBIS (Terrestrial &Freshwater Biodiversity Information System) Programme fundedcreation of this app.This LucidMobile key is part of a series offree interactive keys for identifying New Zealand native andnaturalised plants. Java versions are hosted by Landcare Research(http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/plants).
Hawaiian Scarab ID 1.1.3
LucidMobile
The megadiverse Scarabaeoidea (scarabs, stags, and bess beetles)consists of over 31,000 species that are distributed worldwide andincludes many important agricultural pests, agents of biologicalcontrol of dung and dung flies, important pollinators, and speciesused as habitat bioindicators (Jameson and Ratcliffe, 2002;Ratcliffe, et al., 2002). Despite their ecological, evolutionary,and economic significance, there is an overwhelming lack ofexpertise on these insects. The lack of knowledge is of concernbecause many species are invasive agricultural and economic pests.Conservation of native scarabs and the conservation impact ofnon-native scarabs is an additional concern. Once established,scarab pests are extremely difficult to dislodge, and a full rangeof technologies and controls is needed for their eradication(Jackson and Klein, 2006).This key allows you to easily identifyadult and immature scarab beetles including established pestspecies and potential new invasive scarab species. The key includesscarab beetles that are of biosecurity risk, such as the Chineserose beetle (Adoretus sinicus) and the coconut rhinoceros beetle(Oryctes rhinoceros), as well as scarab beetles that are beneficialrecyclers of cattle dung, such as the gazelle dung beetle(Digitonthophagus gazella) and tumble bugs. The scarab and stagbeetle fauna of Hawaii is of global origin, with non-native specieshailing from Australia, Africa, North America, Asia, and Europe.Only five stag beetles are native to Hawaii, and these are greatlyin need of conservation and study. Guam is a key introductionpathway for many species that have been introduced to Hawaii. Thistool may also be useful in other geographic regions that may beimpacted by invasive scarab beetles, including Florida, California,Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and the American Pacific. It isdesigned for people with varying degrees of knowledge, from outdoorenthusiasts to research scientists.All images were produced by EmmyL. Engasser, except where noted in image captions. The splashscreen and app icons were developed by Jackie Baum. Please see theHawaiian Scarab ID website for proper guidelines for use andcitation of images.Key author: Joshua DunlapFact sheet authors:Joshua Dunlap and Mary Liz JamesonOriginal source: This key is partof the complete Hawaiian Scarab ID tool athttp://idtools.org/beetles/scarab/ (requires internet connection).Full references for all citations may be found at this website,along with checklists for scarabs present in Hawaii and Guam, andmuch more.Published by USDA APHIS ITPPowered by LucidMobile
Citrus Pests Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Citrus is one of the most important commercially grown agriculturalproducts in the United States. Additionally, many citrus varietiesare backyard crop plants, providing important sources of food at alocal community level. As a result, citrus is one of the mosteconomically important groups of plants. Numerous insect peststhreaten the citrus industry and backyard citrus trees throughfeeding damage, while other pests vector diseases that arepotentially lethal.Citrus Pests Key is aimed primarily at extensionagents, inspectors, and other plant professionals with access to alight microscope and hand lens. It is designed to help usersdetermine which type of citrus insect pest they have encountered byfeaturing an interactive key coupled with illustrated, descriptivefact sheets for each pest. Citrus Pests Key is intended to be usedas a screening aid. For definitive species identification,specimens should be sent to an expert for verification.During theinitial development of the key, an advisory committee developed acomprehensive list of over 300 pest and beneficial arthropods thatneeded to be considered for inclusion into the key. Since the keywas designed and scoped as a basic screening aid to support surveyand detection support, 51 total species from the comprehensive listwere selected by the authors based on the following criteria:-commonly found insect pests on cultivated citrus in the U.S. asdetermined by the Citrus Pest Advisory Committee,- citrus insectpests that have been intercepted at U.S. ports but have not becomeestablished,- insect pests that have entered the U.S. but have nowbeen eradicated, and- exotic insect pests of immediate concern toU.S. cultivated citrus.Key authors: Sarahlynne Guerrero, JenniferWeeks, Amanda Hodges, Kirk Martin, and Norman LepplaThis key ispart of a complete Citrus Pests tool:http://idtools.org/id/citrus/pests/Lucid Mobile key developed byUSDA APHIS ITP
Dried Botanicals Key 1.0.8
LucidMobile
Dried botanicals are imported for varied uses including potpourri,decorative plant arrangements, and handicraft items. In thetwenty-first century market, dried botanicals consist of whole orsectioned fungi, fruits, seeds, leaves, and almost anything that isbotanical, has abundant air spaces ("physical fixatives" for thesynthetic oils), has structural interest, and/or is inexpensive(e.g. lawn sweepings and waste products of other industries). Whilechiefly imported, materials are occasionally from North Americansources. These botanicals may include potentially toxic species(e.g. strychnine leaves and fruits) as well as potential invasives(e.g., she-oak, an invasive in Florida). The latter can be aproblem when buyers throw old potpourri in the garden. Some (e.g.members of the Rutaceae) may carry plant diseases.Because thesebotanical materials are often not only sectioned but also bleachedand/or dyed and then scented with fragrance oils, a botanical keyto the whole plant, or even plant parts, is not practical. Thus, inthis unique identification key, features such as shape, size, andtexture are used. The key relies heavily upon the use of images andis structured so that both the professional botanist, who knows thedifference between the Agaricales and Polyporales, and the amateur,who may not be able to distinguish sections of a bracket fungusfrom pieces of stem pith, can achieve an identification for aspecimen. Because of the diversity of plants and plant parts andthe accompanying esoteric vocabulary, practical terms (e.g."football-shaped") have been used in the key. However, to maximizetheir value and validity, the fact sheets utilize botanicalterminology.Key authors: Arthur O. Tucker, Amanda J. Redford, andJulia ScherThis key is part of a complete Dried Botanical ID tool:http://idtools.org/id/dried_botanical/Lucid Mobile key developed byUSDA APHIS ITP
Palm Screening Aid Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Palms are one of the most familiar plant families. They arecommonly cultivated as ornamentals, and many palms have been usedas crop plants for centuries, providing important sources of foodand a variety of other products. As such, palms are one of the mosteconomically important groups of plants. Relative to mostcultivated plants, palms are relatively pest-free. However, anumber of arthropod pests attack palms in sufficient force to be athreat to the plant, and some vector diseases that are potentiallylethal to palms.The intended audience for these keys is non-expertsworking in the field within Cooperative Agriculture Pest Survey(CAPS), National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), and othernational, regional, and state agricultural agencies/organizationswith responsibilities associated with pest and disease survey anddetection. Since these keys are intended as a screening aid forless experienced users in the field, most features in the keys canbe used with the naked eye or a handlens. Infrequently, adissecting microscope or stereoscope may be required for very smallspecimens. For definitive species confirmation, specimens should besent to an expert for verification.Palm Pests is, first andforemost, a tool to aid the non-entomologist user in identifyingwhich type of pest they may have, i.e. mite or scale? beetle orthrips? Therefore, the scope of the keys is the arthropod pests ofpalms, including mites and insects. The keys may take the user toclass, order, family, genus, or species. The pest groups featuredinclude mites, beetles, termites, moths and butterflies, bugs, andthrips. The keys provide screening and identification support tocultivated palm pests known to occur, as of 2010, in the UnitedStates (continental U.S. and Hawaii) and Caribbean Islands. Alsoincluded are pests of immediate concern to cultivated palms in theUnited States and Caribbean essentially those species that willlikely move to this region in the very near future.Key authors:Amanda J. Redford, Terrence Walters, Amanda Hodges, and Forrest W.HowardThis key is part of a complete Screening Aid to Palm Peststool: http://idtools.org/id/palms/sap/Lucid Mobile key developed byUSDA APHIS ITP
com.lucidcentral.mobile.pacific_pests 1.3.4
LucidMobile
When crop pests and diseases occur farmers want immediatesolutions. Time is of the essence. If they have to go searching forinformation which takes days to find, it might already be toolate.They need to know what the problem is, what's caused it, andwhat to do about it. And they want to know now. This app givesextension staff and lead farmers all the information they need totreat the crop instantly. If there is no way of saving a crop, thesteps should help to prevent the problem occurring in the future.After choosing the crop of interest, a series of simple questionsare asked narrowing down the choices until a match is possible bycomparing thumbnail images. Each fact sheet is divided intosections on damage, biology and life cycle, and management. Version7 of the App gives the option to either view Full Fact Sheets, orMini Fact Sheets which contain a summary of the information in thefull fact sheets. Version 7 of the app contains 401 fact sheets. Wewould like to thank ACIAR, the Australian Centre for InternationalAgricultural Research for providing support in the development ofthe app under a sub-regional (Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands andTonga) IPM project (HORT/2016/185). We thank Identic Pty Ltd.,(http://www.lucidcentral.org) for its development of the mobileapp.
Citrus Diseases Key 1.0.6
LucidMobile
Early disease detection and management are essential to ensuringcontinued viability of the U.S. citrus industry. Rapidcommunication of new diseases, significant outbreaks, and accurateinformation are vital. Many diseases are difficult to distinguishfrom one another or disease symptoms mimic disorder symptoms.Images and description of diseases are helpful in making a correctdiagnosis.Citrus Diseases is a symptom-based, illustratedidentification key that encompasses citrus diseases that are in theUnited States as well as those of immediate concern. It is designedto be used by United States quarantine officials responsible forinspecting imports, and by federal, state and local domestic surveyand identification personnel.Key authors: David Serrano, EstherSerrano, Megan Dewdney, and Christina SouthwickEarly diseasedetection and management are essential to ensuring continuedviability of the U.S. citrus industry. Rapid communication of newdiseases, significant outbreaks, and accurate information arevital. Many diseases are difficult to distinguish from one anotheror disease symptoms mimic disorder symptoms. Images and descriptionof diseases are helpful in making a correct diagnosis.CitrusDiseases is a symptom-based, illustrated identification key thatencompasses citrus diseases that are in the United States as wellas those of immediate concern. It is designed to be used by UnitedStates quarantine officials responsible for inspecting imports, andby federal, state and local domestic survey and identificationpersonnel.Key authors: David Serrano, Esther Serrano, MeganDewdney, and Christina SouthwickThis key is part of a completeCitrus Diseases tool: http://idtools.org/id/citrus/diseases/LucidMobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP
TortAI Key 1.1.1
LucidMobile
The purpose of the Tortricids of Agricultural Importance (TortAI)Key is to aid in the identification of tortricid adults encounteredduring domestic surveys and tortricid larvae encountered duringquarantine inspections at U.S. ports of entry. Because the worldtortricid fauna is too large to treat as a whole, this key is notdesigned to identify every tortricid encountered, but rather toreliably eliminate or confirm target taxa if or when they areencountered. It may not be possible to identify many tortricidlarvae using only morphological characters. A molecular sequencesearch tool is provided in the original tool(http://idtools.org/id/leps/tortai/) to allow identifiers withsequencing capabilities the ability to confirm DNA barcodesequences for the larvae of most taxa treated here. TortAI Key isdesigned for use by persons in the continental United Statesperforming domestic surveys for exotic species or encounteringexotic species during port inspections (taxa originating fromHawaii are treated as exotic). Although much of the information canbe applied to other parts of the world, identification charactersfor adults and larvae (outlined below) are specific to the scope ofthe keys and may lead to ambiguous or misleading results when usedoutside of this context. TortAI is not designed as a generalresource for identifying all tortricid species.Key authors: Todd M.Gilligan and Marc E. EpsteinLucid Mobile key developed by USDAAPHIS ITP
DenaliFlora Interactive Key 1.0.15
LucidMobile
This key is intended for visitors to Denali National Park &Preserve to explore the flora. It includes 300 of the most commonand distinctive native plant species that occur in the park.Excluded are many rare species, many difficult to identify species(such as grasses and sedges) and non-native plants (weeds andornamentals).Carefully select the attributes that match aparticular plant you are examining and this interactive key willreturn a short list of candidate species. Once you have this shortlist, use our photos and descriptions to choose the best match andidentify your specimen. The characters used in the key are meant tobe generally understandable to the public and broadly applicable tomost plants.This app is the field companion to the Ecological Atlasof Central Alaska. Treated in the Atlas are all plant species inthe App along with many more ecologically important plants inDenali. The Atlas provides a variety of additional information on aspecies occurrence and ecology in Denali, such as distribution mapsand graphs of elevation, aspect, site moisture and communityecology, along with additional photographs. Links to each plant'sEco-Atlas page are provided within the species descriptions.Thisinteractive key was produced by the Denali National Park Botanyprogram, authored by Celia Hampton-Miller, Carl Roland, Eric Groth,Sarah Stehn and Mary Beth Cook.This app is powered by LucidMobile.
Plants Fungi SW NSW Australia 1.1.0
LucidMobile
This key is designed for anyone who has an interest in finding outabout the plants and fungi of south western New South Wales. Itincludes about 1100 species, accompanied by over 3000 images.Thekey uses a limited number of easily seen characters using a minimumof technical terms to help with identification of plants. It is notdesigned to key out to a single species, though sometimes it does.It is designed to narrow down the possibilities of what the plantmight be to a limited number of species. The photos may then helpyou decide what your plant is.In most cases, the use of a hand lensis not necessary for identification. Identification needing the useof even a low power microscope, or a detailed knowledge oftechnical terms, is beyond the scope of the key.The character"ligules" (for grasses) is the only character in the key thatrequires a hand lens. A hand lens will also be helpful for othercharacters e.g. "spikelet length" for grasses with small seeds.Thenorthern boundary of the area covered by the key is a line drawnfrom 33o S 141o E to 33o S 143.25o E, the west boundary is alongthe South Australian border, the south boundary the northern bankof the Murray River, and the east boundary a line south from 33o S143.25o E to the north bank of the Murray River (an area south andwest from a few kilometres north and east of Mungo NationalPark).Government reserves in the area are: Tarawi Nature Reserve,Mallee Cliffs National Park, Mungo National Park, Mungo StateConservation Area, Nearie Lake Nature Reserve, Euston RegionalPark, Kemendok National Park, and Kemendok Nature Reserve.Non-government reserves are Scotia Sanctuary (Australian WildlifeConservancy) and Nanya Station (University of Ballarat).The keyalso covers (in NSW) nearly all of the species recorded fromKinchega National Park, and most of the species from theMurrumbidgee Valley reserves (National Park, Nature Reserve, andState Conservaton Area) and Willandra National Park, (in SA) mostof the species from Danggali Conservation Park and WildernessReserve, Calperum Pastoral Lease and Scientific Reserve, ChowillaGame and Regional Reserve, and Birds Australia Gluepot Reserve, (inVic) most of the species in north west Victoria, which includes thereserves: Murray Sunset National Park, Hattah-Kulkyne andMurray-Kulkyne National Parks, and Annuello Flora and FaunaReserve.
Weeds of Australian Cotton 1.0.6
LucidMobile
The Weeds of Australian Cotton key is a tool for Australian cottongrowers and their advisors, designed to assist in identifying 50key weed species. Individuals outside of the cotton industry mayalso find benefits in using the tool for weed ID.Weedidentification in early growth stages is of critical importance forbest weed management practices, as similar-looking species oftenhave quite different control requirements, and waiting fordiagnostic features like flowers and fruits to appear means theoptimal window for herbicide applications has long passed. For thisreason, the Weeds of Australian Cotton key includes cotyledonshapes as an important diagnostic character. All keycharacteristics can be assessed with the naked eye or a handlens.It is important to note that weeds not included in the keycould be present in cotton fields, and misidentification ispossible. Confirming identification with an expert is advised,especially if the weed is proving hard to kill.The key isillustrated with hundreds of images to assist in identification.The splash screen image was provided by Melanie Jenson. Otherimages in the key were taken by Graham Charles and Sheldon Navie,unless otherwise stated.The text for the tool was partly providedfrom contributions to WeedPak written by Graham Charles, StephenJohnson and Jeff Werth, and supplied by the Australian CottonResearch and Development Corporation. Some of the text also formspart of the Environmental Weeds of Australia key, written bySheldon Navie. These resources were compiled and edited by DavidThornby.Support for the creation of the Weeds of Australian Cottontool was provided by the Australian Cotton Research and DevelopmentCorporation as part of project UQ1501.This app was created usingthe Lucid Mobile platform, part of the Lucid suite of tools. If youare interested in creating a similar app, or for furtherinformation on creating interactive keys, please visithttp://www.lucidcentral.org
SPIKEY 1.0.3
LucidMobile
SPIKEY: An interactive key to Triodia spinifex grasses of thePilbara, Western Australia is an interactive identification toolcovering all of the hummock grasses (the genus Triodia)colloquially known as ‘spinifex’ that occur in the Pilbarabioregion and adjacent areas of Western Australia. This key coversa total of 28 species and one hybrid, about one-quarter of thespecies in the genus Triodia, using 28 features. This is animportant update; about half of the species treated are recentlydescribed, and are not covered by earlier synopses of Triodia.Triodia are the dominant plants and a major restoration target inarid zone hummock grasslands, an ecosystem covering 18% ofAustralia, and correct identification is critical to successfulrestoration and rehabilitation. This app is intended to be used byland managers, rehabilitation practitioners, botanical consultants,seed collectors, identification botanists and anyone curious aboutTriodia.Contact Details:Matthew BarrettKings Park and BotanicGarden1 Kattidj CloseKings Park, 6005, WesternAustraliamatthew.barrett@bgpa.wa.gov.au
Rainforest Plants of Australia 1.0.25
LucidMobile
Rainforest Plants of Australia – Rockhampton to Victoria, is basedon the popular interactive computer key (distributed as a USB) ofthe same name. The app includes the full identification key to 1140species, fact sheets for all species and features used in the key,introductory and reference sections and over 8,000 images.Pleasenote this is a large download (over 400 MB) and depending on yourconnection, it may take several minutes to download and install theapp. An internet connection is not required once installed.Rainforest Plants of Australia has been developed to identifytrees, shrubs and climbing plants that occur naturally or havebecome naturalized (including exotic weeds) in rainforest fromRockhampton to Victoria. It is a fantastic resource, a thorough andcomprehensive source of information for all those concerned aboutrainforests, their biodiversity, distribution and conservation. Theapp will be vital for researchers and teachers at universities,TAFEs and schools, environmental consultants and governmentagencies, community groups and landowners, bushwalkers, gardenersand anyone with an interest in rainforests or rainforest plants.Both plain English and botanical terms (explained in an illustratedglossary) are used throughout the app to make it applicable to aswide an audience as possible.Despite its Australian focus, this keyprovides a resource for users in other countries. It shows whattype of information is useful and what features can be used inseparating rainforest species. It demonstrates how powerful theLucid Mobile platform is and that such an app can be prepared usingthis program.At the core of this app is an interactiveidentification key powered by Lucid. The key includes 1140 plantspecies that grow in rainforest of eastern Australia, fromRockhampton to Victoria. To help confirm identification the appprovides line drawings, over 8,000 photos and extensive informationon each species, including previously unavailable botanicaldetails. A customised image gallery walk-through tutorial assiststhe user in working the key and accessing the content. Theintroductory sections include information and images on rainforestand the types of rainforest used in this app. Hints are provided onhow to identify rainforest plants as well as an outline of thespecial features and terms used to separate the many species thaton first sight appear to be inseparable!Due to app sizeconstraints, the 12,000 images in the USB version of RainforestPlants of Australia – Rockhampton to Victoria have been reduced toaround 8,000 images, retaining the most useful for identifyingplants in the rainforest.
Diagnosis of Oral Ulceration 1.0.1
LucidMobile
The key to the diagnosis of oral ulceration is a teaching andtraining tool concerned with diagnosing the causes of oralulceration. It is an intuitive diagnostic tool which quicklyreduces the range of likely causes of ulcers based on the patient’shistory and features presented. This diagnostic tool should only beused subject to the disclaimer below.Content developed by LaurieWalsh — UQ School of Dentistry & Alex Forrest — GriffithUniversity.This app is powered by Lucid Mobile.Disclaimer: Thisdiagnostic tool is for educational and training purposes only. Itshould not be used to diagnose specific cases or to make treatmentrecommendations. A qualified dentist should be consulted about anyspecific case.
Antkey Mobile 1.0.7
LucidMobile
Ants are conspicuous components of most terrestrial ecosystems.Ants are important predators, scavengers, granivores, and in thenew world, herbivores. Ants also engage in an astonishing array ofassociations with plants and other insects, and can act asecosystem engineers as agents of soil turnover, nutrientredistribution, and small-scale disturbance.Over 15,000 species ofants have been described, and more than 200 have establishedpopulations outside of their native ranges. A small subset of thesehave become highly destructive invaders including the Argentine ant(Linepithema humile), the big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala),the yellow crazy ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes), the little fire ant(Wasmannia auropunctata), and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsisinvicta) which are currently listed among the world’s 100 worstinvasive species (Lowe et al. 2000). Additionally, two of thesespecies (Linepithema humile and Solenopsis invicta) are among thefour most well studied invasive species generally (Pyšek et al.2008). Although invasive ants are economically costly in both urbanand agricultural areas, the most serious consequences of theirintroduction may be ecological. Invasive ants can greatly modifyecosystems by reducing native ant diversity, displacing otherarthropods, negatively impacting vertebrate populations, anddisrupting ant-plant mutualisms.Invasive ants form a small andsomewhat distinct subset of ants introduced into new environmentsby humans. A majority of introduced ants remain confined tohuman-modified habitats and some of these species are oftenreferred to as tramp ants because of their reliance onhuman-mediated dispersal and close association with humansgenerally. Although hundreds of ant species have become establishedoutside of their native ranges, most research has concentrated onthe biology of only a few species.Antkey is a community resourcefor the identification of invasive, introduced and commonlyintercepted ant species from across the globe.This key was designedto be used with the “Find Best” function. Find best is invoked bytapping on the wand icon on the navigation bar, or by selecting theFind Best option in the navigation drawer.Authors: Eli M. Sarnatand Andrew V. SuarezOriginal source: This key is part of thecomplete Antkey tool at http://antkey.org (requires internetconnection). External links are provided in the fact sheets forconvenience, but they also require an internet connection. Fullreferences for all citations may be found at the Antkey website,along with distribution maps, behavior videos, a fully illustratedglossary, and more.This key was developed in cooperation with theUSDA APHIS Identification Technology Program. Please visithttp://idtools.org to learn more.
Rice Doctor Tagalog 1.0.3
LucidMobile
Rice Doctor is an interactive tool for extension workers, students,researchers and other users who want to learn and diagnose pest,disease, and other problems that can occur in rice; and how tomanage them.This product has been developed by an internationalteam involving –• International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)•Lucid team at the University of Queensland, Australia• PhilippineRice Research Institute (PhilRice), Philippines• Research Institutefor Rice, Indonesia The Australian Centre for InternationalAgricultural Research (ACIAR) has contributed funding for theresearch, development, and production of this product.Thisinteractive tool allows users to diagnose or at least make a shortlist of possible problems occurring in a rice crop. The key coversover 90 pests and diseases and other disorders. The combination oftext descriptions and images helps users in the process ofdiagnosing their problems. Fact sheets on each possible disorderprovide brief descriptions of the signs and symptoms of specificproblems, together with details of any available managementoptions. A keyword search function enables users to directly accessspecific fact sheets. For further information on these disorders,users can link to full fact sheets on the IRRI Rice Knowledge Bankwebsite.This app is powered by Lucid Mobile.
IDentifyIt Cycads 1.0.10
LucidMobile
The IDentifyIt Cycads Tool is a practical, easy-to-useidentification guide that works as an elimination key. It wascreated to assist customs officials, law enforcement officers,border police and Environmental Management Inspectors (EMI’s) withthe identification of South African Encephalartos species, therebyenabling better regulation and monitoring of the local andinternational trade in South African cycads.This free mobile app isdesigned to lead you through a series of interactive steps, usingphotographs and easily observable features, to assist you with thequick identification of cycads. The tool also includes fact sheetscontaining important information such as conservation status,identifying features, geographic location as well assimilar-looking species. Please note that the tool is not designedto aid in identification of cycad seedlings.The IdentifyIt CycadsTool forms part of the IDentifyIt Species Tool project whichcurrently consists of 140 CITES-listed South African plant andanimal species, their look-alike species as well as traded partsand derivatives.The project is a collaboration between the SouthAfrican National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) and TRAFFIC, theWildlife Trade Monitoring Network, a strategic alliance ofWWF-World Wide Fund for Nature and IUCN-The World ConservationUnion. The project was sponsored by NORAD, SANBI and the MazdaWildlife Fund.
IDentifyIt Species 1.0.12
LucidMobile
The IDentifyIt Species Tool is a practical, easy-to-useidentification guide that works as an elimination key. It wascreated to assist customs officials, law enforcement officers,border police and Environmental Management Inspectors (EMI’s) withthe identification of South African TOPS and CITES-listed species,thereby enabling better regulation and monitoring of the local andinternational trade in these threatened and endangered speciesThisfree mobile app is designed to lead you through a series ofinteractive steps, using photographs and easily observablefeatures, to assist you with quick identification. The tool alsoincludes fact sheets containing important information such asconservation status, identifying features, geographic location aswell as similar-looking species. The IDentifyIt Species Toolcurrently consists of 140 CITES-listed South African plant andanimal species, their look-alike species as well as traded partsand derivatives. The next phase of this project will see another300 + species, including amphibians, birds, fish, invertebrates,mammals and reptiles, added to the Species ID Tool.The IDentifyItSpecies Tool project has also developed the IDentifyIt Cycads Toolwhich has been designed to assist with the identification of SouthAfrican Encephalartos Species. The project is a collaborationbetween the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI)and TRAFFIC, the Wildlife Trade Monitoring Network, a strategicalliance of WWF-World Wide Fund for Nature and IUCN-The WorldConservation Union. The project was sponsored by NORAD, SANBI andthe Mazda Wildlife Fund.
Solanaceae Fruit Field Guide 0.1.7
LucidMobile
This field guide is designed to assist growers, workers,students,extension officers and farm advisers to identify insect ormitepests, beneficial organisms (‘beneficials’), diseases anddisordersin tomatoes, capsicums, chillies and eggplants. It isintended tobe a tool for integrated pest management. The frontsection of theguide has a general introduction to pest management,and someuseful summary agronomy tables. The rest of the guide isdevoted toinsect and mite pests, beneficials, diseases or disordersthat maybe found in these crops in either Australia or Cambodia. Italsoincludes a diagnostic tool to help identify crop problems.
com.lucidcentral.mobile.lepidopteran_families 1.1.3
LucidMobile
An interactive lucid key is presented to assist in recognisingfamilies of targeted Lepidoptera of biosecurity concern usingmorphological characters of the adult. Many existing keys to adultLepidoptera lack good illustrations of the important characters andthis key provides high quality photographs of all the charactersused. Easily identifiable features that are visible on setspecimens using a stereomicroscope have been chosen in an attemptto avoid where possible, the type of characters requiringmanipulation or dissection of the specimen for example, wingvenation, apodemes and genitalia. The range of families included inthe key encompasses those exotic species identified by Plant HealthAustralia (2012), Department of Agriculture (Northern AustraliaQuarantine Strategy) (2013) and the National Plant BiosecurityStrategy Diagnostic Network (2013). The key has been adapted fromNielsen et al. (1991), Kristensen (1999) and Holloway et al.(1987). Diagnoses were evaluated using data from Bradley (1986),Common (1990), Holloway (2011), Kyrki (1984), Landry (2003), Miller(1991), Nielsen et al. (1996), Solis (2007) and Zborowski et al.(2007). Diagnostic images were taken by S. Anderson and Y. Luo, andwere prepared from curated specimens, using LEICA DC300 digitalcamera and Leica DC Twain® version 5.1.10 software. Numerousphotographs of each specimen were taken at differing focal planesand these were montaged using Automontage Essentials® 5.020096 ESto produce a single image. Images were taken at 2592 x 1944resolution and saved in TIFF format. The authors would like tothank Ted Edwards for his extensive lepidopteran expertise, MattTaylor, James Walker, John Nielsen, Len Willan, David Britton,Thomas Wallenius, You Ning Su, and Luke Halling. How to cite thiskey Anderson SJ, Luo YY & Bellis GA (2017). LepidopteranFamilies of Biosecurity Concern. Interactive Lucid Key. NorthernAustralian Quarantine Strategy, Department of Agriculture Softwareused Lucid v3.6 was used to construct and manage the identificationkey. Fact Sheet Fusion v2 was used to manage the images and dataand create fact sheets for both the web and mobile application. Theapp was created using the Lucid Mobile Platform. For moreinformation on these tools please visit:http://www.lucidcentral.org
Bamboo Pest ID 1.0.2
LucidMobile
Interactive key to pests found in Bamboo.
Key to the Cassinia group 0.1.4
LucidMobile
An illustrated multi-access key to the species of the Cassiniagroup(Asteraceae: Gnaphalieae). They represent approximately onefifth ofthe species of the Australian Gnaphalieae, also known asthe cudweedor everlasting paper daisy tribe, and are generallywoody plantswith a centre of diversity in south-eastern Australia.As currentlycircumscribed the group comprises the large generaCassinia andOzothamnus as well as the small satellite generaApalochlamys,Calomeria, Haeckeria, Ixodia, Odixia and Paenula.Most of thesegenera appear to be phylogenetically nested inOzothamnus sect.Ozothamnus, but Ixodia and Ozothamnus sect.Hebelaena are actuallymore distantly related. The key does notcover two hybrids; Cassiniax adunca is considered to be a hybridof and intermediate between C.complanata and C. tegulata, andOzothamnus x expansifolius is a namefor any presumed hybrid of O.hookeri regardless of the other parentand thus not a natural unit.Also not covered at this moment are thethree informal phrase nametaxa Ozothamnus sp. Boonoo Boonoo, O. sp.Ebor Falls, and O. sp. MtTomah. The key was produced by CSIROscientist AlexanderSchmidt-Lebuhn and Kirsten Cowley at theAustralian NationalHerbarium (CANB) through funding from the BushBlitz AppliedTaxonomy grant scheme. We would be grateful ifmistakes or otherfeedback were communicated to the first author.The followingcharacters may be particularly useful for quicklynarrowing downthe possibilities during identification:capitulescence size,capitulescence structure, leaf dimensions, leafshape, indumentum(hairs) of young leaves and stems, flowering headdimensions,whether involucral bracts are straight or radiating,and, inparticular for smaller flowering heads, the number offlowers perhead. (Note that leaf hairs refer to the surfaces, thatisexcepting hair types found only in the mid-rib groove on theupperside of young leaves.) Colour, texture or transparencyofinvolucral bracts are somewhat more subjective and should beusedwith care, as their interpretation may differ a bit from persontoperson. The key is deliberately written to minimise the useoftechnical terms. All morphological characters areillustrated,species are illustrated and have distribution maps, andthe keyprovides species profiles and links to the Atlas ofLivingAustralia. Below the character list the user will findoptions fortaxonomic or geographic subselection, allowing forexample torestrict the key to Tasmanian Ozothamnus, if so desired.We aregrateful to Anthony Orchard for lending his expertise onCassiniato this project; Nunzio Knerr for helping with thegeneration ofdistribution maps; Miguel de Salas for helpfuldiscussions on thedistribution of several species in Tasmania; theherbaria AD, BRI,HO, NE, NSW, and PERTH for making availablespecimens for study;and Parks Australia for funding through theBush Blitz AppliedTaxonomy grant scheme. Bush Blitz is apartnership between theAustralian Government, BHP BillitonSustainable Communities andEarthwatch Institute. This app wascreated using the Lucid Mobileplatform, part of the Lucid suite oftools. If you are interestedin creating a similar app, or forfurther information on creatinginteractive keys, please visithttp://www.lucidcentral.org
Camellia Pest ID 1.0.0
LucidMobile
Camellia oleifera (Theaceae) is important woody oil crop. Withtheincreasing of the intensive planting of the crop, the pestsanddiseases are becoming more serious. Based on thefieldinvestigation, high-definition photo shooting, forest farmersandforestry technical practical experience, literature reviewandexpert experience, this system built a pest database including22species of the main insect pests of C. oleifera, includingtheirmorphological characteristics, biology, damage,preventionmeasures. They are 11 species feeding on leaf(Euproctispseudoconspersa Strand, Gatesclarkeana idia Diakonoff,ect.), 9species feeding on stem (Chreonoma atritarsis Picard,Casmarapatrona Meyrick, ect.), 2 species feeding on fruit(Curculiochinensis Chevrolat, etc.). With the Lucid system,102characteristics were extracted contains 4 I-level featuregroups,10 II-level features and 18 III-level features, and all thefeaturestatus linking with the 244 HD pictures. The expert systemprovidesflexible and effective keys for identification to serve thefarmersand technicians.
Wattle - Acacias of Australia 0.1.19
LucidMobile
The Wattle - Acacias of Australia app (WATTLE ver. 3) enablesusersto identify wattle plants that occur anywhere in Australiaorelsewhere in the world where they are grown. It includes1,057formally described species of Acacia, plus several hybridsandinformal taxa of this genus. It also includes two speciesofAcaciella, four species of Senegalia and nine species ofVachelliathat occur in Australia and which were previously includedinAcacia. WATTLE ver. 3 builds upon two previous versions ofWATTLE,namely, the original version that was published in 2001 onCD andversion 2 that was published in 2014 on the Lucidcentralwebsite.Compared with earlier versions, which are no longeravailable,WATTLE ver. 3 contains more species, updated coding andnew orupdated descriptions for each taxon, together withphotographs andimproved distribution maps. At the heart of WATTLEis a powerfulLucid identification key which helps people of allages to quicklyand accurately identify species. The key is a trulyrandom accesstool, one that allows users to enter, in any order,thecharacteristics of a specimen that they wish to identify. Thekeythen lists those species possessing the characteristicsnominated,rejecting those that do not match the criteria entered.Byprogressively providing additional characteristics abouttheunknown specimen, users can narrow the search, eventually endingupwith just one or a few species. The key providescontext-relevantinformation (text and images) that assist users tocorrectlyinterpret the characteristics of the plant they areattempting toidentify. For those who want information about thespecies that hasbeen identified, WATTLE ver. 3 provides fact sheetscontainingillustrations, detailed descriptions, photographs andmaps that canbe accessed directly. Hyperlinks provide simplenavigation betweenfact sheets of related or similar species. WATTLEver. 3 is jointlypublished by the Australian Biological ResourcesStudy (ABRS),Canberra, The Western Australian Department ofBiodiversity,Conservation and Attractions (formerly CALM) andIdentic Pty Ltd,Queensland. WATTLE complements the Flora ofAustralia(www.ausflora.org.au).
ID Species UICN 1.0.6
LucidMobile
ID Species UICN, es una clave digital electrónica para árbolesenvías de extinción o con restricciones para Mesoamérica, estábasadaen características conspicuas de los árboles y anatómicas delamadera, cuyo objetivo es el desarrollo de unaherramientatecnológica de fácil uso y acceso para la identificacióndeespecies en vías de extinción, poco frecuentes y de altovalorcomercial, la cual nos permitirá cimentar las bases paralaconstrucción de un bancos de germoplasma a utilizar en losprocesosde restauración a futuro. Por el momento incorpora 71especies deltotal restringidas para Mesoamérica. ID Species IUCN isanelectronic digital key to trees endangered or restrictedforMesoamerica, is based on conspicuous characteristics of treesandanatomical wood, whose objective is the development ofatechnological tool easy to use and access the identificationofendangered species, rare and of high commercial value, whichwillallow us to lay the foundation for the construction of agenebankto be used in restoration processes in the future. For nowitincorporates 71 species of the total restricted for Mesoamerica.
Key to Insect Orders – Revised Edition 0.1.8
LucidMobile
Insects make up the vast bulk of species diversity, with just overa million described species organized into about thirty majorsubgroups called orders. Orders are in turn divided into families,families are divided into genera, and genera are divided intospecies. Properly defined; orders, families and genera are eachgroups of species that have descended from a unique commonancestor, as a result of which they share similar structuralcharacteristics and have certain biological attributes in common.Not all insect orders are equal in species number; some have just afew hundred species while the larger orders have hundreds ofthousands of species. Most insects are in just four large orders:Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera. The range ofstructural characteristics and biological features tends to bebroader in the more species-rich orders. Predictions about thebiology, behaviour and ecology of an insect can often be made onceyou know its order. But how can you know the order to which aninsect belongs? Insects can be identified in various ways.Comparing a specimen with a book of illustrations of identifiedinsects is one way. Using a printed key is another way. This LucidMobile key combines the advantages of these methods and adds a newdimension of simplicity and power to the process of identification.This simple key aims to identify most common adult insects to thelevel of order. It has been designed for a range of users,including advanced secondary students, beginning undergraduates andothers interested in entomology, and includes information about thestructure and biology of insects as well as their identifyingfeatures. Three of the groups included in this key (Protura,Collembola and Diplura) are six-legged arthropods treated asinsects in the vernacular sense, but now usually formallyclassified in their own order, outside the order Insecta. How canyou tell if an insect is an adult so it can be identified usingthis key? That is a simple question without a simple answer. Ifyour insect has fully-developed, functional wings then it is anadult. However, some adult insects have reduced, non-functionalwings and others have no wings at all. In these cases the adultforms have fully developed genitalia at the apex of the abdomen.Many, but not all, nymphal or immature forms are identifiable usingthe same features used to identify adults. The 'Key to InsectOrders' was originally created by staff at the Department ofEntomology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia(Gordon Gordh; David Yeates; Tony Young; Sue McGrath), based on thesimplified keys to insect Order found in Collecting, Preserving andClassifying Insects by E.C. Dahms, G.B. Monteith and S. Monteith(Queensland Museum, 1979), Worms to Wasps by M.S. Harvey and A.L.Yen (Oxford University Press, 1989) and A Field Guide to Insects inAustralia by P. Zborowski and R. Storey (Reed Books, 1995). Thisnew edition of Insect Orders has been revised by Professor SteveMarshall at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. This app wascreated using the Lucid suite of tools, for more information pleasevisit https://www.lucidcentral.org
Sheep Parasites
LucidMobile
Sheep Parasites enables users (veterinary students, practitioners,parasitologists and potentially farmers) to identify both endo-andecto-parasites of sheep and goats that commonly occur in Australiaand around the world. This key includes a comprehensive guide tomorphological identification of at least 74 parasite genera/speciesincluding nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, protozoa, ticks, mites,lice and flies. Furthermore, a brief pointwise description of eachparasite and associated disease together with photographs isprovided in the App. At the heart of Sheep Parasites are severalLucid identification keys which help users to quickly andaccurately identify parasite genera/species. The users are requiredto identify the host (i.e. sheep or goat) and parasite category(e.g. nematode/roundworm, trematode/flatworm) they want to identifyand enter morphological characteristics of the parasite. The keythen shortlists those parasite genera/species harbouring thecharacteristics entered, eliminating those that do not match theidentification criteria entered. A stepwise entry of additionalcharacteristics can narrow down the search to one or few parasitegenera/species. For users who want information about the parasite(identified) and associated disease, Sheep Parasites provides factsheets containing descriptions and photographs that brieflydescribe various aspects of the parasite/disease includingpredilection site, morphology, pathology, clinical signs, diagnosisand epidemiology. Authors: Muhammad Azeem SAEED, Abdul JABBAR ThisApp was created using the Lucid suite of tools, for moreinformation please visit: https://www.lucidcentral.org For support,bug reports, or to give feedback please visit:https://apps.lucidcentral.org/support/
com.lucidcentral.mobile.pestnet 0.2.0
LucidMobile
PestNet is a network that helps people worldwide obtain rapidadvice and information on crop protection, including theidentification and management of plant pests. It started in 1999.Anyone with an interest in plant protection is welcome to join.PestNet is free to members and is moderated, ensuring that messagesare confined to plant protection.
Ecosites of Ontario 1.0.13
LucidMobile
Key to the Provincial Terrestrial and Wetland Ecosites ofOntario.This is an interactive tool for people who want to quicklyidentifyecosites. It will be helpful to students and peopleinterested inecological research and monitoring. The tool allowsthe user toenter known information about Ontario ecosites (ES001 –ES188, andES222 – ES224), and includes both wetland andterrestrialcomponents. The identification keys are not atraditionaldichotomous key, but rather work by selecting featuresthatdescribe the ecosite. Selections may add or removeadditionalquestions. As you enter feature information the list ofremainingpossible ecosites are filtered. Eventually you are leftwith onlyone or two choices. This app is powered by Lucid Mobile.
Plants of South Eastern New South Wales 0.1.15
LucidMobile
Area covered by the key The northern boundary is at 33.4° S, i.e.from Gosford and Bathurst to about 100 km west of Forbes. Thewestern boundary is at 146.9° E, from about 100 km west of Forbesto Albury. The southern boundary is the NSW/Victorian border. PlantDistributions Plant distributions are derived from the mapsgenerated for individual species in Spatial Portal, Atlas of LivingAustralia https://spatial.ala.org.au/ and from personalobservation, and occasionally from the NSW Department ofEnvironment and Heritage Bionet Atlashttp://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/ATLAS_/AtlasSearch.aspx.Records dated before 1 January 1976 have been disregarded.Distributions are given only for within the area covered by thiskey. Coastal records are from east of the escarpment west of Sydneyand east of the hills inland from the Princes Highway. Records inthe ranges are from the escarpment west of Sydney and the hillswest of the Princes Highway to the western edges of the largenational parks running south from the Blue Mountains to theVictorian border. Records on the tablelands are from west of thelarge national parks in the ranges to north and south of the ACT.Records on the Western Slopes are west and north of the ACT. PlantNames Plant names are those of the Australian Plant Census as atMay 2018. In cases where the Council of Heads of AustralianHerbaria has not yet made a determination, plant names published inhttp://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/ and/orhttps://vicflora.rbg.vic.gov.au/ are used. Photos used in the keyMost photos have been sourced from the Internet. Some were takenduring the fieldwork for the books Flowers of the South Coast andRanges of New South Wales (3 volumes) and Flowers of the ACT andRegion. For some species recorded in this area, no photographs areavailable, or photographs are only available by linking to anothersite on the Internet. Software used Lucid v3.6 was used toconstruct and manage the identification key. Fact Sheet Fusionv2.05.125 was used to manage the images and data and create factsheets for both the web and mobile application. The Plants of SouthEast NSW app (Android and iOS) was created via the Lucid MobilePlatform. For more information on these tools please visitwww.lucidcentral.org Feedback With about 3,000 manually enteredspecies, there are sure to be mistakes in this key. Due toincreasing ill health I have released the app while there are stillmany small errors in the Fact Sheets. However, as far as possible,all errors in the actual key have been corrected. Please advise meof such, or give me suggestions about how the key could beimproved. Photos that users send me to fill in the gaps would begreatly appreciated. My email address is woodbook@optusnet.com.auAbout the author Betty Wood, by training a pharmacologist,developed an interest in wildflowers and their identification manyyears ago when she first settled in Canberra. Her mother-in-law, anEnglish botanist, helped her to learn to use botanical keys toidentify Australian plants. She is co-author (with her husband Don)of Flowers of the South Coast & Ranges of New South Wales inthree volumes, Flowers of the ACT & Region, and sole author ofSimple Guide to Eucalypts and Similar Trees of the South coast andRanges of NSW (Including the Illawarra and Southern Highlands) andthe Lucid key and app Plants and Fungi of South Western New SouthWales.
Bunching Vegetables 1.0.4
LucidMobile
An interactive key and field guide for the identification ofinsectspests, beneficials, diseases and disorders in Australia.SandraMcDougall, Andrew Watson, Len Tesoriero, Valerie Draper,Tony Napierand Gerard Kelly. Bunching vegetables covered by thisguide are:Brassicaceae family - Leafy brassicas: Gai lan (Chinesebroccoli,Chinese kale); Buk choy (Chinese white cabbage; Chinesechard, Bokchoy); Pak choy (Shanghai buk choy); Choy sum (Chinesefloweringcabbage); Gai choy (Chinese mustard) - Radishes: Longwhite radish(Daikon); Radish (globe, oval, and oblong types) -Broccolini -Watercress Amaranthaceae family - Amaranth (Chinesespinach, Enchoy) - English spinach - Beet (red and silver)Convolvulaceaefamily - Kang kong (Water spinach, Waterconvolvulus) Asteraceaefamily - Garland chrysanthemum(Chrysanthemum greens,Chop-suey-green) Amaryllidaceae family -Alliums: Shallot (true);Shallot (Spring onion, Japanese bunchingonion, Welsh onion); Leek;Chives; Garlic chives Apiaceae family -Parsley - Dutch carrots -Celery Fabaceae (Leguminosae) family -Snake beans First published2017. Published by NSW Department ofPrimary Industries 2017 © Stateof New South Wales through theDepartment of Industry, Skills andRegional Development, 2017. Youmay copy, distribute and otherwisefreely deal with thispublication for any purpose, provided that youattribute the NSWDepartment of Primary Industries as the owner.Disclaimer: Theinformation contained in this publication is basedon knowledge andunderstanding at the time of writing (March 2017).However, becauseof advances in knowledge, users are reminded of theneed to ensurethat information upon which they rely is up to dateand to checkcurrency of the information with the appropriateofficer of theDepartment of Primary Industries or the user’sindependent adviser.Recognising that some of the information inthis document isprovided by third parties, the State of New SouthWales, theeditors and the publisher take no responsibility for theaccuracy,currency, reliability and correctness of any informationincludedin the document provided by third parties.
Rice Doctor Odisha
LucidMobile
Rice Doctor Odisha is an interactive tool for extension workers,students, researchers and other users who want to learn anddiagnose pest, disease, and other problems that can occur in rice;and how to manage them. This product has been developed by aninternational team involving – • International Rice ResearchInstitute (IRRI) • Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice),Philippines • Research Institute for Rice, Indonesia • and theLucid team at Identic, Australia The Australian Centre forInternational Agricultural Research (ACIAR) has contributed fundingfor the research, development, and production of this product. Thisinteractive tool allows users to diagnose or at least make a shortlist of possible problems occurring in a rice crop. The key coversover 90 pests and diseases and other disorders. The combination oftext descriptions and images helps users in the process ofdiagnosing their problems. Fact sheets on each possible disorderprovide brief descriptions of the signs and symptoms of specificproblems, together with details of any available managementoptions. A keyword search function enables users to directly accessspecific fact sheets. For further information on these disorders,users can link to full fact sheets on the IRRI Rice Knowledge Bankwebsite. This app is powered by Lucid Mobile.
com.lucidcentral.mobile.appw
LucidMobile
The worldwide trade in plants for use in aquaria and ponds isamulti-million dollar industry. Aquatic, semi-aquatic,andamphibious plants are exported, largely from tropicalandsubtropical regions, to countries around the world. Thismovementacross international borders is of great concern,particularlysince many aquatic plants have the ability to dispersewidelythrough a remarkably effective variety of vegetative andsexualmechanisms. Serious ecological consequences can result whentheseplants are released into waterways, where they can becomedominantand displace native plants. Many plants with origins intheaquarium trade have subsequently become serious environmentalweedsin various countries, such as water hyacinth(Eichhorniacrassipes), Salvinia (Salvinia molesta), East IndianHygrophila(Hygrophila polysperma), Cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana),AsianMarshweed (Limnophila sessiliflora), water lettuce(Pistiastratiotes), and Melaleuca quinquenervia. Many more have ahighpotential to become invasive. Aquatic weed species on theU.S.Federal Noxious Weed list are represented in 24 of thekey'sgenera. This key allows you to identify genera offreshwateraquatic and wetland plants currently cultivatedcommercially innurseries around the world for the aquarium and pondplant trade aswell as some genera grown in private collections orin associationwith ornamental ponds. It attempts to capture asnapshot of theindustry — to cover all the freshwater taxa in thetrade as of2017. The aquarium and pond plant industry is dynamicthough;explorations are constantly undertaken to find new aquaticplantssuitable for introduction to the industry, while artificialhybridsof already-established species are constantly being producedtogenerate new, more attractive plants. Preventing theintroductionof invasive aquatic weeds into new areas, and slowingtheirdispersal once introduced, requires correct identification,yet thesheer diversity and phenotypic plasticity of aquatic plantsmakestheir identification a challenge. This key is designed to beusedby people with varying degrees of knowledge, from aquaticplanthobbyists to expert botanists. All images were produced byShaunWinterton, except where noted in image captions. The splashscreenand app icons were developed by Identic Pty. Ltd. Please seetheAquarium & Pond Plants of the World website forproperguidelines on use and citation of images. Key author:ShaunWinterton Fact sheet authors: Shaun Winterton and JamieBurnettOriginal source: This key is part of the complete Aquarium&Pond Plants of the World tool at https://idtools.org/id/appw/ThisLucid Mobile key was developed in cooperation with the USDAAPHISIdentification Technology Program (ITP). Pleasevisithttps://idtools.org to learn more. For more information ontheLucid suite of tools please visit https://www.lucidcentral.org