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Occupational Outlook Handbook 1
Occupational Outlook Handbook 2011 – 2012edition by the U.S. Department of Labor newly updated, featureswell written job descriptions for hundreds of different types ofjobs; 90 percent of the jobs available in the United States. TheOccupational Outlook Handbook is a nationally recognized source ofcareer information, designed to provide valuable assistance toindividuals making decisions about their future work lives.In each description, the book discusses:• The training, education, and advancement needed.• Job Earnings.• Expected job prospects.• What workers do on the job.• Working conditions.The Occupational Outlook Handbook is an essential tool when youwant to make informed and intelligent decisions about yourcareer.Easy to navigate, search and the links works.The U.S. Department of Labor To foster, promote, and develop thewelfare of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of theUnited States; improve working conditions; advance opportunitiesfor profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits andrights.
Become Debt Free Now 1
Become Debt Free Now includes the following topics:Section I: Introduction on debtsChapter 1: What Exactly is Debt?Chapter 2: Why Do People Get Into Debt?Chapter 3: How to Avoid Debts.Section II: Guide to get rid of your debtsChapter 4: Summarize your debtsChapter 5: Create a Debt Reduction PlanChapter 6: Steps towards being debt freeChapter 7: Help yourself outSection III: Conclusion
Export Licensing Guide 2
A Guide to Export Licensing Requirements: Thisbook is designed to give people who are new to exporting, and, inparticular, new to export controls, a general understanding ofDepartment of Commerce regulations and how to use them. Here youcan find information for: Does My Shipment Require an ExportLicense?; What types of items does the Department of Commerceregulate?; Does the Department of Commerce regulate all exports?;Is there a list of restricted countries to which I cannot export?;So how do I know if my shipment needs an export license?; Do allitems have an ECCN ?; Where do I find the Commerce Control List?;So if my item is EAR99, does that mean I don’t need a license?;What is the difference between EAR99 and NLR ?; If I determine myitem is classified EAR99 and I can ship under NLR , what do I needto do?; What is a license exception?; What do you mean byprohibited end-user or end-use?; Do the licensing requirementschange depending on how I’m sending the item?; I’m not a company,I’m just sending something overseas to a friend. Does this mean Idon’t need to worry about whether or not my item needs a license?;Does it matter if what I’m sending is under $2500 dollars?; Is ashipment to an Army Post Office (APO ) or Fleet Post Office (FPO )considered an export?; Can I just have my freight forwarder fillout the license related information on the Shippers ExportDeclaration or AES record?; What if my customer asks me to send theitem to their freight forwarder here in the U.S.? Do I still haveobligations?; I’ve got some paperwork from past exports made beforeI started here, can I just use the same information again?; Mycompany has been exporting for years and I’ve never heard of anECCN or license requirement. Is this requirement new?; How do I getan ECCN number for my item?; I know the Schedule B number for myitem, will that help in determining the ECCN?; What is the ScheduleB Number and how do I get it?; I’ve been told that I can I get anofficial ECCN determination over the phone from the Department ofCommerce. Is this true?; I don’t have time to wait for a responseto my classification request. Are there any alternatives to this?;I’ve found an official classification done by the Department ofCommerce back in 1996. Can I still use this?; Once I’ve determinedmy ECCN , what do I do?; How do I screen my customer?; What happensif I don’t get the proper export authorization?; I’m a smallbusinessperson. Does everyone have to follow these regulations?; IfI do have to apply for an export license, can I do it online?; Isthere a fee associated with submitting a license application to BIS?; Is there someone I can call if I have additional questions orneed specific guidance?; Also there is a list of UsefulTerms.
Foot Marches 1.0
This manual is a guide for commanders andtheir staffs in the procedures and techniques of foot marches. Itdescribes the march mission, characteristics and types of footmarches, and march training to include planning procedures, dutiesof commanders, march discipline, march hygiene, and march safety.The material herein applies to all levels of conflict withoutmodification.
Stop Kneeling Be Assertive 1
Stop kneeling stand up be assertive contains the following topics:Understanding AssertivenessHow Assertive Are You? 10 Questions To Find OutBeing Assertive At WorkHow to Assertively Communicate with Co-workersHow to Talk to your Boss about Problems or ConcernsHow to Say No and Be Assertive in Social Settings1. When to Say NoHow to Say "No" and Not Feel Guilty About itBeing Assertive in Social SettingsHow to Raise Assertive Children10 Tips for Raising an Assertive ChildTips for Raising Assertive GirlsTips for Raising Assertive BoysConclusion
US Army Drill and Ceremonies 2
Drill and Ceremonies: This manual is for theU.S. Army; the proponent of this publication is the U.S. ArmyInfantry School. This manual is designed for use by JROTC, ROTC,Army National Guard, Active Army, Army Reserve, Officer Candidates,new recruits, and delayed entry personnel. This manual providesinstruction for Army wide uniformity in the conduct of drill andceremonies. It includes methods of instructing drill, teachingtechniques, individual and unit drill, manual of arms for infantryweapons, and various other aspects of basic drill instruction. Thepurpose of drill is to enable a commander or noncommissionedofficer to move his unit from one place to another in an orderlymanner; to aid in disciplinary training by instilling habits ofprecision and response to the leader’s orders; and to provide forthe development of all soldiers in the practice of commandingtroops. Contents: Part One: DRILL: Chapters; 1. Introduction, 2.Drill Instructions, 3. Commands and the Command Voice, 4.Individual Drill, 5. Individual Drill with Weapons, 6. Squad Drill,7. Platoon Drill, 8. Company Drill, 9. Battalion and Brigade Drill:Part Two: CEREMONIES: 10. Reviews, 11. Parades, 12. Honor Guards,13. Retreats and Reveilles, 14. Funerals, 15. Colors, 16. SaluteBattery, 17. Civilian Participation in Military Ceremonies,Appendix: Saluting, Manual of Arms, Manual of Arms-SpecialtyWeapons, Manual of Arms-Saber and Sword, Symbols, Manual of theGuidon, Ceremony Checklist, Mounted Drill, Flags and Colors,Glossary, References.The United States Department of Defense (DOD) is the federaldepartment charged with coordination and supervising all agenciesand functions of the government relating directly to nationalsecurity and the military. The DOD is headquartered at the Pentagonin Arlington, Virginia.The Military Departments at the Pentagon publishes some of the verybest manuals, handbooks and guidebooks on a wide range of topics;teaching skills, tactics and techniques.The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth, considerthat some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years, thousandsof man hours, and first hand operational experience. Also materialin most of these manuals has been shared with other MilitaryBranches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended.Listed below you will see some of the major departments orcomponents of the Department of Defense. Here you will find just afew book titles of the many sponsored works from eachdepartment.Department of the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival;Air Force Handbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF WeaponsHandling Manual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded OrdnanceBooby-traps UXO Recognition and Reporting Chart.Department of the Army: US Army Survival Manual FM 21-76;Survival Skills U.S. Army / Special Operations, Tactics,Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook; Special ForcesMedical Handbook; Military Mountaineering; Boobytraps ArmyInstruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions; Guerrilla Warfare;Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army Special Forces Handbook;Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations.United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2 Technical Manual;U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S. Marine Guidebook;Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps; Booby Traps CloseCombat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC Land Navigation; Scouting andPatrolling; Combat Water Survival; Map Reading; Sniper CounterSniper.
Survival 1
SURVIVAL: A “proven” comprehensive survivalmanual with concise explanations, pictures, and detailedillustrations; this is an essential book for anyone. The content ofthis manual is unmatched in depth; knowledge is drawn from hundredsof years, thousands of man hours, and first hand operationalexperience. If you are a trainer, this is the corner stone on whichto build a training program. Learning life saving skills willreduce fear of the unknown and give you self-confidence. Psychologyis a key ingredient in having the will to survive and is essential.Increase your chances of survival by planning, preparation, andpractice. Survivors have related feelings of apathy andhelplessness because they could not medically treat themselves. Oneperson with a fair amount of basic medical knowledge can make adifference in the lives of many. Three essentials of survival:water, food, and shelter-are prioritized according to the estimateof the actual situation. In some areas, your need for shelter maytake precedence over your need for food and possibly even your needfor water. For example, prolonged exposure to cold can causeexcessive fatigue and weakness (exhaustion). Fire craft teaches youthe ability to start a fire; you can cook, preserve food, providewarmth, purify water, sterilize bandages, signal for rescue, andproduce tools & weapons. We can live for weeks without food,but it may take days or weeks to determine what is safe to eat andto trap animals in the area. Plants can provide you with medicines,chemicals for poisoning fish, preserving animal hides. Smalleranimals actually present more of a threat to you than largeanimals. To compensate for their size, nature has given many smallanimals weapons such as fangs and stingers to defend themselves.Each year, a few people are bitten/attacked by sharks, alligators,and bears. However, each year more victims die from bites byrelatively small venomous snakes. Even more victims die fromallergic reactions to bee stings. Imagine being in a survivalsituation without any weapons, tools, or equipment. You wouldprobably feel helpless, but with the proper knowledge and skills,you can easily improvise needed items. In a survival situation, youmay have to cross a water obstacle. It may be in the form of ariver, a lake, a bog, or quicksand. Whatever the obstacle, you needto know how to cross it safely. If you are not proficient in usinga map and compass, you must take the steps to gain this skill.There are several methods by which you can determine direction byusing the sun and the stars. Nuclear, chemical, and biological(NBC) man-made hazards have become potential realities in moderntimes. The potential of these hazards intensifies the problems ofsurvival because of the serious dangers posed by either radioactivefallout or contamination. If you are subjected to any of theeffects of nuclear, chemical, or biological event, the survivalprocedures recommended in this book may save your life.
Gang Threat Assessment 1
The NGIC is a multiagency effort thatintegrates the gang intelligence assets of federal, state, andlocal law enforcement entities to serve as a centralizedintelligence resource for gang information and analytical support.The mission of the NGIC is to support law enforcement agenciesthrough timely and accurate information sharing andstrategic/tactical analysis of federal, state, and local lawenforcement intelligence focusing on the growth, migration,criminal activity, and association of gangs that pose a significantthreat to communities throughout the United States. The NGICconcentrates on gangs operating on a national level thatdemonstrate criminal connectivity between sets and commonidentifiers and goals. Because many violent gangs do not operate ona national level, the NGIC also focuses on regional-level gangs.NGIC is staffed and supported by a number of partnering agencies,including the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives(ATF), Bureau of Prisons (BOP), Department of Justice (DOJ),Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Customs and BorderProtection (CBP), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), FederalBureau of Investigation (FBI), Immigration and Customs Enforcement(ICE), NDIC, and United States Marshals Service (USMS). The NGICproduces intelligence assessments, intelligence bulletins, jointagency intelligence products, and other nonstandard intelligenceproducts for customers. This intelligence assessment is acollaborative effort between the National Gang Intelligence Center(NGIC) and the NDIC to examine the threat posed to the UnitedStates by criminal gangs; it supports U.S. Department of Justicestrategic objectives 2.2 (to reduce the threat, incidence, andprevalence of violent crime) and 2.4 (to reduce the threat,trafficking, use, and related violence of illegal drugs). Theassessment is based on federal, state, and local law enforcementinformation and is supplemented by information retrieved from opensources. This assessment discusses the proliferation of gangs fromurban areas to suburban and rural locations, estimates of thenumber of gangs and gang members in the United States, gang types,gang-related criminal activities, locations where specific gangsoperate, and the relationships between gangs and other criminalorganizations. Regional summaries highlighting the most significantgang-related trends are also provided. The assessment alsoidentifies intelligence gaps and provides predictive estimatesregarding significant gang related issues.The National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) is a multi-agencyeffort that integrates the gang intelligence assets of federal,state, and local law enforcement entities to serve as a centralizedintelligence resource for gang information and analyticalsupport.The mission of the NGIC is to support law enforcement agenciesthrough timely and accurate information sharing andstrategic/tactical analysis of federal, state, and local lawenforcement intelligence focusing on the growth, migration,criminal activity, and association of gangs that pose a significantthreat to communities throughout the United States.The NGIC concentrates on gangs operating on a national levelthat demonstrate criminal connectivity between sets and commonidentifiers and goals. Because many violent gangs do not operate ona national level, the NGIC will also focus on regional-level gangs.We are staffed and supported by a number of partnering agenciesincluding the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives,Bureau of Prisons, Department of Defense, Department of Justice,Department of Homeland Security, Department of Housing and UrbanDevelopment, Department of State, Drug Enforcement Administration,Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigration and CustomsEnforcement, National Drug Intelligence Center, and United StatesMarshals Service.
Navy SEAL Fitness, & Nutrition 1
TWO Great Books combine into one; save moneybuying this way! Membership in the Naval Special Warfare (NSW)community requires an extraordinarily high level of total bodyphysical fitness. A combination of muscular strength, flexibilityand cardiovascular fitness is essential to carry out assignedmissions. To train most effectively for these physically demandingtasks, SEALs and others within the NSW community need clear,concise, and authoritative guidance on physical fitness trainingregimens, these manuals has been written to meet this need. Tableof Contents: CHAPTERS 1; Overview of Physical Fitness, 2; SEALMission-Related Physical Activities, 3; Cardio-respiratoryConditioning, 4; Running for Fitness, 5; Swimming for Fitness, 6;Strength Training, 7: Flexibility, 8; Calisthenics, 9; Plyometrics,How Plyometrics Work, 10; Load-Bearing, 11; Training for SpecificEnvironments, 12; Training and Sports Related Injuries, 13; HarmfulSubstances that Affect Performance, Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids,14; Other Training-Related Issues, 15; Physical Fitness andTraining Recommendations, The SEAL Physical Fitness Program, APhysical Fitness Program for Confined Spaces, A Physical FitnessProgram for Coming Off Travel, Elimination of “Old” Exercises, TheNavy SEAL Physical Readiness Test (PRT), Appendix, Weight LiftingTechniques, Common Anatomical Terms and Diagrams, Foot Care forLoad-Bearing. Peak Performance Through Nutrition and Exercise:Contents include: Chapters 1: Energy Balance and Body Composition;Energy Balance; Estimating Energy Needs; Body Composition; FatDistribution. 2: Overview of Nutrition - Energy ProvidingNutrients; Vitamins and Minerals; Water. 3: Eating for OptimalHealth and Fitness - Dietary Guidelines for Americans; The FoodGuide Pyramid; Food Labels; Selecting Nutrient-Dense Foods;Vegetarian Diets; Eating Out; Snacking; Nutrition Throughout Life.4: Overview of Physical Fitness - What is Physical Fitness? FITTPrinciple; Fuel Used During Exercise; Exercise Sequence; Trainingand Detraining; 5: Cardiorespiratory Training; CardiorespiratoryPhysiology; Benefits of Cardiorespiratory Exercise; AerobicExercise Guidelines; Training Design and Progression; 6: Walk, Run,Swim - Walking and Running Gear; Walking; Running; Swimming.Strength Training - Strength versus Endurance; Benefits of StrengthTraining; Determinants of Muscle Size; Strength TrainingGuidelines; Equipment; Types of Workouts. Calisthenics -Calisthenic Guidelines. Flexibility - Benefits of Stretching;Flexibility Exercises; Training in Confined Spaces; AerobicConditioning; 7: Strength Training; Strength versus Endurance;Benefits of Strength Training; Determinants of Muscle Size;Strength Training Guidelines; Equipment; Types of Workouts; 8:Calisthenics, Calisthenics Guidelines; 9: Flexibility; Benefits ofStretching; Flexibility Exercises; 10: Training in Confined Spaces;Aerobic Conditioning; Strength Training; Workout Design; MoraleDuring Deployment. 11: Nutrition for Exercise - Carbohydrate Needs;Protein Needs; Vitamin and Mineral Needs; Fluid Needs; Nutritionfor Exercise Recovery; 12: Deployment and Altered Climates -Acclimating to Altered Environments; General Nutrition Issues;Physical Activity Concerns; Hot Environments; Cold Environments;Altitude. 13: Training and Overuse Injuries - Injuries: Treatmentand Prevention, Return to Duty; Overtraining Syndrome. 14:Supplements and Performance - Vitamin and Mineral Supplements;Nutritional Ergogenic Agents; Ergolytic. 15: Training Issues forWomen - Pregnancy and Lactation; Female Athlete Triad; 16: Age andPerformance; Changes in Metabolism and Body Composition;Nutritional Needs; Countering Age-Associated Changes in Fitness.17: Adopting Healthy Habits - Setting "SMART" Goals; ReachingGoals; Maintaining Healthy Habits; Appendix: Ideas for Healthy FoodChoices; Sample Workout; Strength Exercises; Resources
U.S. Army Ranger Handbook 2
Just released FEBRUARY 2011, this Latest edition is the mostcurrent, fully revised and is currently in use by the U.S.Military. In this handbook you will find Tactics and Techniquesused by Army Rangers: TABLE OF CONTENTS RANGER CREED STANDINGORDERS ROGER’S RANGERS RANGER HISTORY PREFACE CH:1 LEADERSHIPPRINCIPLES DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES, & ACTIONS ASSUMPTION OFCOMMAND CH:2 OPERATIONS TROOP-LEADING PROCEDURES COMBATINTELLIGENCE WARNING ORDER OPERATION ORDER FRAGMENTARY ORDERANNEXES COORDINATION CHECKLISTS TASK, PURPOSE, OPERATION TERRAINMODEL CH:3 FIRE SUPPORT BASIC FIRE SUPPORT TASKS, TARGETING, &INTERDICTION CAPABILITIES RISK ESTIMATE DISTANCES TARGET OVERLAYSCALL FOR FIRE CLOSE AIR SUPPORT CLOSE COMBAT ATTACK AVIATION CH:4COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT MILITARY RADIOS MAN-PACK RADIO ASSEMBLY(AN/PRC-119F) AUTOMATED NET-CONTROL DEVICE BASIC TROUBLESHOOTINGANTENNAS REPAIRS CONSTRUCTION & ADJUSTMENT FIELD EXPEDIENT OMNIDIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS ANTENNA LENGTH PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS CH:5DEMOLITIONS INITIATING (PRIMING) SYSTEMS DETONATION (FIRING)SYSTEMS SAFETY EXPEDIENT EXPLOSIVES-IMPROVISED SHAPED CHARGE,PLATTER CHARGE, GRAPESHOT CHARGE DEMOLITION KNOTS MINIMUM SAFEDISTANCES BREACHING CHARGES TIMBER CUTTING CHARGES CH:6 MOVEMENTFORMATIONS MOVEMENT TECHNIQUES STANDARDS FUNDAMENTALS TACTICALMARCHES MOVEMENT DURING LIMITED VISIBILITY CONDITIONS DANGER AREASCH:7 PATROLS PRINCIPLES PLANNING RECONNAISSANCE SECURITY CONTROLCOMMON SENSE PLANNING TASK ORGANIZATION INITIAL PLANNING &COORDINATION COMPLETION OF PLAN RECONNAISSANCE PATROLS FUNDAMENTALSOF RECONNAISSANCE TASK STANDARDS ACTIONS ON THE OBJECTIVE, AREARECONNAISSANCE, ZONE RECONNAISSANCE COMBAT PATROLS PLANNINGCONSIDERATIONS AMBUSH HASTY AMBUSH DELIBERATE (POINT/AREA) AMBUSHPERFORM RAID SUPPORTING TASKS LINKUP DEBRIEF OBJECTIVE RALLY POINTPATROL BASE MOVEMENT TO CONTACT TECHNIQUES TASK STANDARDS CH:8BATTLE DRILLS REACT TO CONTACT (VISUAL, IED, DIRECT FIRE [RPG])(07-3-D9501) BREAK CONTACT (07-3-D9505) REACT TO AMBUSH (FAR)(07-3-D9503), (NEAR) (07-3-D9502) KNOCK OUT BUNKER (07-3-D9406)ENTER AND CLEAR A ROOM (07-4-D9509) ENTER A TRENCH TO SECURE AFOOTHOLD (07-3-D9410) BREACH A MINED WIRE OBSTACLE (07-3-D9412)REACT TO INDIRECT FIRE (07-3-D9504) CH:9 MILITARY MOUNTAINEERINGTRAINING TASK ORGANIZATION RESCUE EQUIPMENT MOUNTAINEERINGEQUIPMENT ANCHORS KNOTS BELAYS ROPE INSTALLATIONS RAPPELLING CH:10MACHINE GUN EMPLOYMENT SPECIFICATIONS DEFINITIONS CLASSES OFAUTOMATIC WEAPONS FIRE OFFENSE DEFENSE CONTROL OF MACHINE GUNSAMMUNITION PLANNING CH:11 CONVOY OPERATIONS PLANNING FIVE PHASES OFTRUCK MOVEMENT CH:12 URBAN OPERATIONS AN URBAN PERSPECTIVESTRATEGIC IMPORTANCE OF URBAN AREAS MODERN ARMY URBAN OPERATIONSTASK ORGANIZATION FULL SPECTRUM OPERATIONS PREPARATIONS FOR FUTUREURBAN OPERATIONS CONDUCT OF LIVE, VIRTUAL, & CONSTRUCTIVETRAINING RANGERS – URBAN WARRIORS PRINCIPLES METT-TC CLOSE QUARTERSCOMBAT REHEARSALS TTPS FOR MARKING BUILDINGS AND ROOMS CH:13WATERBORNE OPERATIONS ROPE BRIDGE PONCHO RAFT OTHER WATERCRAFTCH:14 EVASION/SURVIVAL EVASION INITIAL EVASION POINT EVASIONMOVEMENT ROUTES COMMUNICATIONS HIDE SITE HOLE-UP AREA CAMOUFLAGESURVIVAL MEMORY AID SURVIVAL KITS NAVIGATION TRAPS & SNARESPROCESSING OF FISH OR GAME SHELTERS FIRES METHODS CH:15 AVIATIONREVERSE PLANNING SEQUENCE SELECTION & MARKING OF PICKUP ANDLANDING ZONES AIR ASSAULT FORMATIONS SAFETY REQUIREMENTS DESERTMOUNTAINS OBSERVATION, ATTACK, UTILITY, CARGO HELICOPTERS CH:16FIRST AID LIFESAVING STEPS CARE UNDER FIRE PRIMARY SURVEY AIRWAYMANAGEMENT BREATHING BLEEDING SHOCK EXTREMITY & ABDOMINALINJURIES BURNS HOT WEATHER (HEAT) INJURIES POISONOUS PLANTIDENTIFICATION FOOT CARE LITTER HYDRATION & ACCLIMATIZATIONWORK, REST, & WATER CONSUMPTION APPENDIX A RESOURCES REACT TOINDIRECT FIRE, CONTACT, A NEAR AMBUSH, A FAR AMBUSH BREAK CONTACTLINKUP LINEAR DANGER AREA LARGE OPEN DANGER AREA CROSSING A SMALLOPEN AREA GLOSSARY INDEX
NBC Decontamination 1.0
The Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC)fundamentals published in this manual provides detailed guidance onconducting decontamination operations; and can be performed bychemical and nonchemical personnel. Survivability and reducing theeffect of any chemical threat are the ultimate goals of NBCdecontamination.The use of NBC weapons creates unique residual hazards thatmayrequire decon. In addition to the deliberate use of these weapons,collateral damage, natural disasters, and industrial emitters mayrequire decon. The presence of contamination generally reduces theeffectiveness of our combat power. Contamination forces us intoprotective equipment that degrades our ability to performindividual and collective tasks.CONTAMINATION FORMS1-1. The following are the different forms of contamination:• Solids – radioactive particles, biological spores, or dustyagents that could appear as a fine dust.• Liquids – liquid droplets that fall like rain. Droplets canrange fromthick and sticky to the consistency of water.• Vapors or gases – created by bursting munitions or generators.These clouds are affected by the weather and can cover largeareas.• Aerosols – fine liquids or solid particles suspended in theair. Theybehave much like vapors.CONTAMINATION-HAZARDS TRANSMISSION1-2 Contamination hazards can be transmitted in the followingmanner:• Transfer. Anything that touches a surface covered with liquidorsolid contamination will tend to pick up that contamination andmove it from one surface to another.• Spread. Touching a surface covered with liquid chemical agentcanspread contamination on the same surface, thereby, increasingthesize of the contaminated area.• Vapor. Vapors can be carried through the air in the form of adust,atomized liquids (aerosols), or true gases. Vapors in anopen/outdoorarea disperse rapidly, so there is no need to decon.• Desorption. Liquid-chemical contamination absorbs intoporoussurfaces. Once absorbed, it begins to desorb or give off gas; thatis, low levels of vapor pass out of the contaminated surface intothe air and can be transferred to any surface that contacts it,including bare skin.• Radiation. Radiation is given off by radioactive dust or dirt,most ofwhich appears as fallout. For decon purposes, radiation can bethought of as a solid.AGENT CLASSIFICATION1-3. Depending on the length of time agents will be a hazard, theyareclassified as--• Nonpersistent – an immediate threat that lasts a few minutes.Theyrarely require decon.• Persistent – takes a longer time to act and may last for days.In aprotected environment, these agents can last for long periods oftime.All agents are affected to some extent by the weather. Evenradiological particles can “rain out” of the air and form hot spotsonthe ground. Biological organisms are greatly affected bysunlight.Chemical agents can be decontaminated by the weather. Thedurationof a hazard is a complex estimation that is based on numerousfactorswhich include the—Type of contamination.Contamination density and droplet size.Temperature.Wind speed.Sunlight.Humidity and rain.Composition of the contaminated surface.Type of soil and terrain.
Intelligence Officers Handbook 1.0
This publication is a roles and missionsmanual for G2/S2 sections. It provides guidance for officers andNCOs assigned to G2/S2 sections. FORCE PROJECTION PRINCIPLES;MILITARY DECISION-MAKING PROCESS; S2 OPERATIONS CHECKLISTS;INTELLIGENCE TRAINING CHECKLIST; INTELLIGENCE PREPARATION OF THEBATTLEFIELD; RECONNAISSANCE AND SURVEILLANCE; PRIORITY INTELLIGENCEREQUIREMENTS, INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS, AND INDICATORS
Military Intelligence 1.0
Army’s keystone manual for military intelligence (MI) doctrine. Itdescribes in detail these areas: THE OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENT;UNIFIED ACTION; FUNDAMENTALS IN FULL SPECTRUM OPERATIONS; PROCESSIN FULL SPECTRUM OPERATIONS; DISCIPLINES; ALL-SOURCE INTELLIGENCE:HUMAN; IMAGERY; SIGNALS MEASUREMENT AND SIGNATURES; TECHNICAL;COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION OPERATIONS; LINGUIST; SUPPORT
Advanced Avionics Handbook 2
The Advanced Avionics Handbook is a new publication designedtoprovide general aviation users with comprehensive informationonadvanced avionics equipment available in technicallyadvancedaircraft. This handbook introduces the pilot to flightoperationsin aircraft with the latest integrated “glass cockpit”advancedavionics systems. The arrival of new technology to generalaviationaircraft has generated noticeable changes in threeareas:information, automation, and options. Advanced avionicssystems canautomatically perform many tasks that pilots andnavigatorspreviously did by hand. For example, an area navigation(RNAV) orflight managementsystem (FMS) unit accepts a list of points that define aflightroute, and automatically performs most of the course,distance,time, and fuel calculations. Once en route, the FMS orRNAV unitcan continually track the position of the aircraft withrespect tothe flight route, and display the course, time, anddistanceremaining to each point along the planned route. Chaptersinclude:Introduction to Advanced Avionics; Electronic FlightInstruments;Navigation; Automated Flight Control; InformationSystems;Essential Skills Checklist; GlossaryThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of theUnitedStates Department of Transportation with authority toregulate andoversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S.(NationalAirworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of1958 createdthe group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency",and adopted itscurrent name in 1967 when it became a part of theUnited StatesDepartment of Transportation. The Federal AviationAdministration'smajor roles include: Regulating U.S. commercialspacetransportation. Regulating air navigation facilities'geometry andFlight inspection standards. Encouraging anddeveloping civilaeronautics, including new aviation technology.Issuing, suspending,or revoking pilot certificates. Regulatingcivil aviation to promotesafety, especially through local officescalled Flight StandardsDistrict Offices. Developing and operatinga system of air trafficcontrol and navigation for both civil andmilitary aircraft.Researching and developing the National AirspaceSystem and civilaeronautics. Developing and carrying out programsto controlaircraft noise and other environmental effects ofcivilaviation.
U. S. Marine Corps Survival 2
U.S. Marine Corps Summer Survival Course,Training and Skills: U.S. Marine Corps Summer Survival Course,Training and Skills is an excellent manual for anyone who mightfind themselves in a survival situation. Table of Contents: 1.Requirements for Survival, 2. Survival Kit, 3. Water Procurement,4. Expedient Shelters & Fires, 5. Core Values & MountainLeadership Challenges, 6. Signaling & Recovery, 7. SurvivalNavigation, 8. Survival Traps & Snares, 9. Survival Uses ofGame, 10. Expedient Tools, Weapons and Equipment, 11. Foraging forPlants & Insects for Survival Uses, 12. Survival Fishing, 13.Tracking, 14. Survival Medicine, 15. Mountain Weather, 16. Intro toEvasion, Appendixes: A. Evasion plan of Action, B. Survival QuickReference Check List, C. Animal Habits, D. Tactical Considerations.ABOUT the AUTHOR: The United States Department of Defense (DOD)is the federal department charged with coordination and supervisingall agencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia.The Military Departments at the Pentagon publishes some of the verybest manuals, handbooks and guidebooks on a wide range of topics;teaching skills, tactics and techniques.The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth, considerthat some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years, thousandsof man hours, and first hand operational experience. Also materialin most of these manuals has been shared with other MilitaryBranches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended.Listed below you will see some of the major departments orcomponents of the Department of Defense. Here you will find just afew book titles of the many sponsored works from eachdepartment.Department of the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival;Air Force Handbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF WeaponsHandling Manual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded OrdnanceBooby-traps UXO Recognition and Reporting Chart.Department of the Army: US Army Survival Manual FM 21-76;Survival Skills U.S. Army / Special Operations, Tactics,Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook; Special ForcesMedical Handbook; Military Mountaineering; Boobytraps ArmyInstruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions; Guerrilla Warfare;Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army Special Forces Handbook;Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations.United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2 Technical Manual;U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S. Marine Guidebook;Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps; Booby Traps CloseCombat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC Land Navigation; Scouting andPatrolling; Combat Water Survival; Map Reading; Sniper CounterSniper.
Astronaut Fact Book 1.0
Book includes the following topics:Alphabetical List that includes current, former and deceased ofU.S. and International Astronauts in U.S. Program.Biographical Sketches1996 U.S. Candidate Class1996 International Candidates in the U.S. Space ProgramSelection by GroupsCongressional Space Medal of HonorEducational Institutions and United States Service Academies FromWhich U.S. Degrees were EarnedBirthplaces by State and CountriesScouting Records, Active Military Service and Human Space FlightLogNASA's vision: To reach for new heights and reveal the unknownso that what we do and learn will benefit all humankind.To do that, thousands of people have been working around theworld -- and off of it -- for 50 years, trying to answer some basicquestions. What's out there in space? How do we get there? Whatwill we find? What can we learn there, or learn just by trying toget there, that will make life better here on Earth?
Navy SEAL Physical Fitness 1
Membership in the Naval Special Warfare (NSW)community requires an extraordinarily high level of total bodyphysical fitness. A combination of muscular strength, flexibilityand cardiovascular fitness is essential to carry out assignedmissions. To train most effectively for these physically demandingtasks, SEALs and others within the NSW community need clear,concise, and authoritative guidance on physical fitness trainingregimens, this manual has been written to meet this need. Theauthors of this comprehensive guide, physicians and physiologists,were chosen because of their special qualifications in the area ofphysical fitness and their knowledge of the NSW and SEAL community.Their expertise ensured the guide would be written with the uniquerequirements of the NSW community in mind, and that our goal ofexpanding the individual Navy SEAL's knowledge of attaining andretaining a high level of fitness would be achieved. Table ofContents: CHAPTER 1; Overview of Physical Fitness, CHAPTER 2; SEALMission-Related Physical Activities, CHAPTER 3; Cardio-respiratoryConditioning, CHAPTER 4; Running for Fitness, CHAPTER 5; Swimmingfor Fitness, CHAPTER 6; Strength Training, CHAPTER 7: Flexibility,CHAPTER 8; Calisthenics, CHAPTER 9; Plyometrics, How PlyometricsWork, CHAPTER 10; Load-Bearing, CHAPTER 11; Training for SpecificEnvironments, CHAPTER 12; Training and Sports Related Injuries,CHAPTER 13; Harmful Substances that Affect Performance,Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids, CHAPTER 14; Other Training-RelatedIssues CHAPTER 15; Physical Fitness and Training Recommendations,The SEAL Physical Fitness Program, A Physical Fitness Program forConfined Spaces, A Physical Fitness Program for Coming Off Travel,Elimination of “Old” Exercises, The Navy SEAL Physical ReadinessTest (PRT), Appendix, Weight Lifting Techniques, Common AnatomicalTerms and Diagrams, Foot Care for Load-Bearing.The United States Department of Defense ( DOD or DoD ) is thefederal department charged with coordination and supervising allagencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at thePentagon publishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks andguidebooks on a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics andtechniques. The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth,consider that some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years,thousands of man hours, and first hand operational experience. Alsomaterial in most of these manuals has been shared with otherMilitary Branches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended. Listedbelow you will see some of the major departments or components ofthe Department of Defense. Here you will find just a few booktitles of the many sponsored works from each department: Departmentof the Army: US Army Survival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S.Army / Special Operations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide;Ranger Handbook; Special Forces Medical Handbook; MilitaryMountaineering; Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives andDemolitions; Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. ArmySpecial Forces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; MilitaryFirst Aid. United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2 TechnicalManual; U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S. MarineGuidebook; Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps; BoobyTraps Close Combat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC Land Navigation;Scouting and Patrolling; Combat Water Survival; Map Reading; SniperCounter Sniper.
Aviation Instructor’s Handbook 1
Aviation Instructor's Handbook: Designed for ground instructors,flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, theAviation Instructor’s Handbook was developed by the FlightStandards Service, Airman Testing Standards Branch, in cooperationwith aviation educators and industry to help beginning instructorsunderstand and apply the fundamentals of instruction. This handbookprovides aviation instructors with up-to-date information onlearning and teaching, and how to relate this information to thetask of teaching aeronautical knowledge and skills to students.Experienced aviation instructors will also find the updatedinformation useful for improving their effectiveness in trainingactivities. Chapters include: Human Behavior; The Learning Process;Effective Communication; The Teaching Process; PlanningInstructional Activity; Assessment; Instructor Responsibilities andProfessionalism; Techniques of Flight Instruction; Risk Management;Appendix: References; Developing a Test Item Bank; Certificates,Ratings, and Endorsements; Personal Minimums Checklist; FlightInstructor Endorsements; Relationships of Decision-Making Models;Glossary; IndexThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of theUnited States Department of Transportation with authority toregulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S.(National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency",and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of theUnited States Department of Transportation. The Federal AviationAdministration's major roles include: Regulating U.S. commercialspace transportation. Regulating air navigation facilities'geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouraging anddeveloping civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology.Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates. Regulatingcivil aviation to promote safety, especially through local officescalled Flight Standards District Offices. Developing and operatinga system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil andmilitary aircraft. Researching and developing the National AirspaceSystem and civil aeronautics. Developing and carrying out programsto control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civilaviation.
Aviation Weather Services 2
Aviation Weather Services, Advisory Circular 00-45G, Change 1, ispublished jointly by the National Weather Service (NWS) and theFederal Aviation Administration (FAA). AC 00-45G, Change 1,explains U.S. aviation weather products and services. It detailsthe interpretation and application of advisories, coded weatherreports, forecasts, observed and prognostic weather charts, andradar and satellite imagery. Product examples and explanations aretaken primarily from the Aviation Weather Center’s Aviation DigitalData Service. Aviation Weather Services, Advisory Circular, AC00-45G, Change 1, supersedes AC 00-45G. Chapters includes: AVIATIONWEATHER SERVICE PROGRAM, NATIONAL OCEANIC and ATMOSPHERICADMINISTRATION (NOAA), FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,DISSEMINATION of AVIATION WEATHER PRODUCTS, AVIATION WEATHERPRODUCT CLASSIFICATION AND POLICY, CLASSIFICATION of AVIATIONWEATHER PRODUCTS, Types of AVIATION WEATHER INFORMATION, AVIATIONROUTINE WEATHER REPORTS (METAR) and AVIATION SELECTED SPECIALWEATHER REPORTS (SPECI), METAR/SPECI Type and Frequency ofLightning, PILOT WEATHER REPORTS (PIREP), RADAR WEATHER REPORT(SD/ROB), RADAR AND SATELLITE IMAGERY, SATELLITE, GRAPHICALOBSERVATIONS, SURFACE ANALYSIS CHARTS, FREEZING-LEVEL GRAPHICS,RADAR SUMMARY CHART, PRODUCTS FOR AVIATION HAZARDS, CENTER WEATHERADVISORY (CWA), TROPICAL CYCLONES, VOLCANIC ASH ADVISORY PRODUCTS,TERMINAL AERODROME FORECAST, INTERNATIONAL AVIATION ROUTEFORECASTS, FORECAST CHARTS, LOW-LEVEL SIGNIFICANT WEATHER (SIGWX)CHARTS, HIGH-LEVEL SIGNIFICANT WEATHER, NATIONAL CONVECTIVE WEATHERFORECAST, CURRENT ICING PRODUCT, FORECAST ICING POTENTIAL,GRAPHICAL TURBULENCE GUIDANCE, METEOROLOGICAL IMPACT STATEMENT,DEFINITION OF COMMON TERMS USED IN EN ROUTE FORECASTS ANDADVISORIES, STANDARD CONVERSION CHART, DENSITY ALTITUDECALCULATION, ADVISORY PLOTTING CHART, WEATHER RADAR NETWORK,GEOGRAPHICAL AREA DESIGNATOR MAP, PRESENT WEATHER SYMBOLS,TURBULENCE AND ICING INTENSITY DEPICTIONS.
Aviation Maintenance Handbook 2
Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook-General was developed asone of a series of three handbooks for persons preparing formechanic certification with air-frame or power-plant ratings, orboth. It is intended that this handbook will provide basicinformation on principles, fundamentals, and technical proceduresin the subject matter areas common to both the air-frame andpower-plant ratings. Emphasis in this volume is on theory andmethods of application.
Army Aviation Maintenance 1.0
Army Aviation Maintenance outlinesrequirements concerning aviation maintenance structure,organizations, and functions. The intended audiences are aviationmaintenance technicians, and aircraft repair and maintenancepersonnel.
Plane Sense Aviation Knowledge 2
Plane Sense introduces aircraft owners andoperators, or prospective aircraft owners and operators, to basicinformation about the requirements involved in acquiring, owning,operating, and maintaining a private aircraft. This handbook can bea valuable reference tool for anyone who would like to review the“nuts and bolts” of aircraft ownership. Aircraft owners andoperators, or anyone considering aircraft ownership, should befamiliar with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR),which details regulations for aircraft owners, operators, pilots,aircraft mechanics, and maintenance providers. Since therequirements can be updated and the regulations can change, theFederal Aviation Administration (FAA) recommends that you contactyour nearest FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), where thepersonnel can assist you with the various requirements for aircraftownership, operation, and maintenance. The FAA has also addedinformation for aviation enthusiasts who own (or are interested inowning) light-sport aircraft, a new and evolving sector of thegeneral aviation marketplace. This handbook highlights regulationsand regulatory guidance material, as well as providing adviceregarding where to locate answers to your questions. Table ofContents: Chapter 1: Aircraft Owner Responsibilities; Chapter 2:Buying an Aircraft; Chapter 3: Airworthiness Certificate; Chapter4: Aircraft Registration; Chapter 5: Special Flight Permits;Chapter 6: Light-Sport Aircraft; Chapter 7: Aircraft Maintenance;Chapter 8: Maintenance Records; Chapter 9: AirworthinessDirectives; Chapter 10: Service Difficulty Program; Chapter 11:Obtaining FAA Publications and Records; Appendix A: FAA ContactInformation; Appendix B: Regulatory Guidance Index.
Military Combat Boobytraps 1.0
A boobytrap is an explosive charge cunninglycontrived to be fired by an unsuspecting person who disturbs anapparently harmless object or performs a presumably safe act. Twotypes are in use improvised and manufactured. Improvised boobytrapsare assembled from specially provided material or constructed frommaterials generally used for other purposes. Manufacturedboobytraps are dirty trick devices made at a factory for issue totroops. They usually imitate some object or article that hassouvenir appeal, IED or that may be used by the target toadvantage. The ingenious use of local resources and standard itemsis important in making effective boobytraps. They may produceunexpected results if conceived in sly cunning and built in variousforms. Boobytraps cause uncertainty and suspicion in the mind ofthe enemy. They may surprise him, frustrate his plans, and inspirein his soldiers a fear of the unknown. A. This manual containsprocedures, techniques, and expedients for the instruction of thesoldier in the assembly, use, detection, and removal of boobytrapsin combat. B. Included are descriptions and discussions of thedesign and functioning characteristics of standard demolitionitems; firing devices, explosives, missiles, hand grenades, mortarammunition, artillery ammunition, and bombs. C. This manual alsocontains information on a variety of items and indigenous materialsuseful for improvising firing devices, explosives, and pyrotechnicmixtures for guerrilla warfare applications. D. Factory-producedboobytraps (dirty trick devices) are described. Most of these havebeen developed and used in the field by foreign armies. E. Safetymeasures pertinent to booby trapping operations are provided forthe protection of troops from casualty. This manual containsdetailed instruction, diagrams and illustrations to ensureexcellent understanding of all aspects of boobytraps and improvisedexplosive devices.
Military First Aid Handbook 1.0
This app contains the ultimate Handbook for First Aid and EmergencyAid. This is the go-to reference which no aid worker can gowithout. This works on all phones and tablets. The text issearchable and the layout is pleasing to the eye. Contents of theBook: 1. Fundamental Criteria 2. Basic Measures 3. SpecificInjuries 4. Fractures 5. Climatic Injuries 6. Bites and Stings 7.Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Environment 8. PsychologicalReactions Appendix A. First Aid Case and Kits, Dressings, andBandages Appendix B. Rescue and Transportation Procedures Thismanual meets the first aid training needs of individual servicemembers. Because medical personnel will not always be readilyavailable, non-medical service members must rely heavily on theirown skills and knowledge of life-sustaining methods to survive onthe integrated battlefield. This publication outlines both self-aidand aid to other service members (buddy aid). More importantly, itemphasizes prompt and effective action in sustaining life andpreventing or minimizing further suffering and disability.
Ranger Handbook 2
Ranger Handbook app comes with greatnavigational features, searchability, read aloud functionality,portrait and landscape mode viewing for a great reading experience.This is the Newest Ranger Manual by the U.S. Army. Chaptersinclude: Leadership, Operations, Fire Support, Movement, Patrols,Battle Drills, Communications, Antennas, Army Aviation, WaterborneOperations, Military Mountaineering, Evasion/Survival, First Aid,Demolitions, Urban Operations, Vehicle Convoy Operations. Topics onAmbushes, Raids, Breaking Contact, Medevac, Indirect Fire and muchmuch more. Packed with great information. Survival to living offthe land. So much learned from the U.S. Army Special Operation herein the book.The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is thefederal department charged with coordination and supervising allagencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at thePentagon publishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks andguidebooks on a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics andtechniques. The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth,consider that some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years,thousands of man hours, and first hand operational experience. Alsomaterial in most of these manuals has been shared with otherMilitary Branches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended. Listedbelow you will see some of the major departments or components ofthe Department of Defense. Here you will find just a few booktitles of the many sponsored works from each department. Departmentof the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival; Air ForceHandbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF Weapons HandlingManual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded Ordnance Booby-trapsUXO Recognition and Reporting Chart. Department of the Army: USArmy Survival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S. Army / SpecialOperations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook;Special Forces Medical Handbook; Military Mountaineering;Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions;Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army SpecialForces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations. United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2Technical Manual; U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S.Marine Guidebook; Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps;Booby Traps Close Combat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC LandNavigation; Scouting and Patrolling; Combat Water Survival; MapReading; Sniper Counter Sniper.
Aircraft Powerplant Mechanics 2
The Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook-Power-plant Volume 1(FAA-H-8083-32) is one of a series of three handbooks for personspreparing for certification as a power plant mechanic. It isintended that this handbook provide the basic information onprinciples, fundamentals, and technical procedures in the subjectmatter areas relating to the power plant rating. It is designed toaid students enrolled in a formal course of instruction, as well asthe individual who is studying on his or her own.This book includesthe following topics:Chapter 1 Aircraft EnginesChapter 2 EngineFuel and Fuel Metering SystemsChapter 3 Induction and ExhaustSystemsChapter 4 Engine Ignition and Electrical SystemsChapter 5Engine Starting Systems
Electronic Warfare Operations 1.0
Electronic Warfare in Operations: Organizedinto seven chapters and six appendixes. Each chapter addresses amajor aspect of Army EW operations. The appendixes address aspectsof EW operations that complement the operational doctrine. Aglossary contains selected terms. • Chapter 1 discusses the natureand scope of electronic warfare and the impact of theelectromagnetic environment on Army operations. • Chapter 2 offersa discussion of EW support to full spectrum operations, combatpower, the warfighting functions, and information tasks. • Chapter3 introduces the organizational framework for command and controlof EW operations. • Chapter 4 describes how commanders integrate EWoperations throughout the operations process. • Chapter 5 discussesthe coordination required to synchronize and deconflict EWoperations effectively. • Chapter 6 provides the baseline forintegrating EW operations into joint and multinational operations.• Chapter 7 discusses the enabling activities that support EWoperations, such as command and control, intelligence, logistics,technical support and EW training. • Appendix A discusses theelectromagnetic environment. • Appendix B illustrates an EWappendix to an operation order. • Appendix C illustrates an EWrunning estimate. • Appendix D discusses EW related reports andmessages. • Appendix E offers a reference guide to Army and jointEW capabilities. • Appendix F discusses EW-related tools andresourcesThe United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is thefederal department charged with coordination and supervising allagencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at thePentagon publishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks andguidebooks on a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics andtechniques. The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth,consider that some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years,thousands of man hours, and first hand operational experience. Alsomaterial in most of these manuals has been shared with otherMilitary Branches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended. Listedbelow you will see some of the major departments or components ofthe Department of Defense. Here you will find just a few booktitles of the many sponsored works from each department. Departmentof the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival; Air ForceHandbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF Weapons HandlingManual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded Ordnance Booby-trapsUXO Recognition and Reporting Chart. Department of the Army: USArmy Survival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S. Army / SpecialOperations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook;Special Forces Medical Handbook; Military Mountaineering;Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions;Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army SpecialForces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations. United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2Technical Manual; U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S.Marine Guidebook; Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps;Booby Traps Close Combat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC LandNavigation; Scouting and Patrolling; Combat Water Survival; MapReading; Sniper Counter Sniper.
Guidance on Re-Export Controls 1
Guidance on the Commerce Department’s Re-export Controls: TheUnited States Department of Commerce regulates exports andreexports of “dual-use” items, i.e., goods, software andtechnologies with commercial and proliferation/militaryapplications, through its Export Administration Regulations (EAR).If you are outside the United States and wish to export or reexportan item that is of U.S. origin or that has a U.S. connection, yourproduct may require a license from the U.S. Department ofCommerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS). This book isdesigned to give an understanding of the regulations and how to usethem. What is a Reexport? A reexport is the shipment ortransmission of an item subject to the EAR from one foreign country(i.e., a country other than the United States) to another foreigncountry. A reexport also occurs when there is “release” oftechnology or software (source code) subject to the EAR in oneforeign country to a national of another foreign country. Here issome helpful information found in this book: Determining whetheryour item is subject to the Export Administration Regulations.;Determining whether a U.S.-origin item requires a license fromBIS.; Determining whether your foreign-produced product requires alicense from BIS because it contains some U.S.-origin content.;Determining if your foreign product requires a license from BISbecause it is the direct product of U.S. technology or software.;Determining if your foreign product requires a license from BISbecause it is the direct product of a plant or major component of aplant that was developed based on U.S. technology.; Is your producteligible for a License Exception?; Are there any specialrestrictions I should know about?; Why should you comply withreexport license requirements?; Where to apply for a reexportlicense?; Additional information and contacting BIS.
101 Credit Score Fixes 2
101 Credit Score Quick fixes: Your creditscore lets lenders know quickly how much of a credit risk you are.Based on this credit score, lenders decide whether to trust youfinancially, other companies use your credit report as well,employers, land lords and insurance companies.One of the problems with credit scores is that there is quite a bitof misinformation circulated about, especially through some lessthan scrupulous companies who claim they can help you with yourcredit report and credit score for a price.This book will teach you the powerful strategies you need to buildthe financial habits that will help you to keep a high creditrating. Plus, unlike many other books on the subject, this ebookwill show you how to deal with your everyday life while repairingyour credit. Your credit repair does not happen in a vacuum.Here is a list of the helpful information contain in this book;Table of Contents:Introduction;The Basics;The Best Ways to Boost Your Credit Score;Keep Your Credit Score Safe;Avoid Common Credit Score Mistakes;Dealing With Your Credit Report To Deal With Your CreditScore;Dealing With a Credit Score after a Big Problem;Dealing With Professional Credit Help;General Good Financial Habits Build Good Credit Scores;Think Like A Lender;Develop an Organized Strategy To Repair Your Credit Score;Loans and Your Credit Score;Make Credit Repair Easier On Yourself;Student Credit Repair;Dealing With Debt;Credit Repair and Your Emotions;Parting Credit Tips;Conclusion
Combat Engineer Platoon 1.0
This book includes the following topics:Chapter 1. IntelligenceChapter 2. ManeuverChapter 3. Mobility and SurvivabilityChapter 4. Fire SupportChapter 5. Air DefenseChapter 6. Combat Service SupportChapter 7. Command and Control
Today’s FBI 2
Today’s FBI: Throughout its more than 100-yearhistory, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has protectedthe American people from threats to our way of life. As some of ourgreatest threats – gangsters, public corruption, hate crimes, cyberattacks, white collar fraud, and terrorism have evolved; the FBIhas changed to meet them head-on. The Bureau’s success has alwaysdepended on its agility, its willingness to adapt, and the ongoingdedication of its personnel. But in the years since the tragicattacks of September 11, 2001, the pace of change has beenunprecedented. The FBI has adapted to globalization and newtechnologies. We have developed new capabilities to fightinternational criminal organizations, sophisticated cybercriminals, fraud that undermines the economy, foreign spies seekingto steal vital secrets and technologies, and terrorists working tocommit mass murder. Please learn about our Today’s FBI here,contents of this fine book are as follows: Introduction to the FBI;The Director; Headquarters / Field Offices; International Offices /FBI Budget; A Short History of the FBI; Working for the FBI;Intelligence; Safeguarding Civil Liberties; Investigative Programs;Counterterrorism; Counterintelligence; Cyber Crime; PublicCorruption; Environmental Crime; Civil Rights; Organized Crime;Violent Gangs; White-Collar Crime; Significant Violent Crime; FBITen Most Wanted Fugitives; Crimes Against Children Art Crime;Indian Country; Background Investigations; Law Enforcement Supportand Training; FBI Laboratory; Law Enforcement TrainingOpportunities; Operational Technology Division; Criminal JusticeInformation Services Division; Information Sharing; Working withthe Private Sector; Domestic Security Alliance Council; InfraGard;Business Alliance; Academic Alliance; FBI Citizens Academy;Ensuring Accountability and Compliance; Annual Inspections; Officeof Professional Responsibility; Office of Integrity and Compliance;The Inspector General; The Office of the General Counsel; TheSecurity Division; Acknowledgements.
Military Police 1.0
This field manual (FM) addresses militarypolice (MP) maneuver and mobility support (MMS), area security(AS), internment and resettlement (I/R), law and order (L&O),and police intelligence operations (PIO) across the full spectrumof Army operations. Although this manual includes a discussion ofcorps and division MP elements, it primarily focuses on theprinciples of platoon operations and the tactics, techniques, andprocedures (TTP) the platoon uses to accomplish its mission. ThisFM provides the capabilities and organization of the MP,demonstrates the flexibility and diversity of MP in adapting to anymission throughout the full spectrum of Army operations, andcharacterizes the MP as a combat-force multiplier. Additionally,this manual identifies the fact that the Army will not conductoperations alone and defines the role of the MP in support ofjoint, multinational, and interagency operations.The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is thefederal department charged with coordination and supervising allagencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at thePentagon publishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks andguidebooks on a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics andtechniques. The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth,consider that some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years,thousands of man hours, and first hand operational experience. Alsomaterial in most of these manuals has been shared with otherMilitary Branches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended. Listedbelow you will see some of the major departments or components ofthe Department of Defense. Here you will find just a few booktitles of the many sponsored works from each department. Departmentof the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival; Air ForceHandbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF Weapons HandlingManual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded Ordnance Booby-trapsUXO Recognition and Reporting Chart. Department of the Army: USArmy Survival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S. Army / SpecialOperations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook;Special Forces Medical Handbook; Military Mountaineering;Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions;Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army SpecialForces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations. United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2Technical Manual; U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S.Marine Guidebook; Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps;Booby Traps Close Combat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC LandNavigation; Scouting and Patrolling; Combat Water Survival; MapReading; Sniper Counter Sniper.
Instrument Procedures Handbook 2
Revised Edition: This manual is designed as a technical referencefor professional pilots who operate under instrument flight rules(IFR) in the National Airspace System (NAS). It expands oninformation contained in the FAA-H-8083-15, Instrument FlyingHandbook, and introduces advanced information for IFR operations.Instrument flight instructors, pilots, and students will also findthis handbook a valuable resource since it is used as a referencefor the Airline Transport Pilot and Knowledge Tests and for thePractical Test Standards. It also provides detailed coverage ofinstrument charts and procedures including IFR takeoff, departure,en route, arrival, approach, and landing. Safety informationcovering relevant subjects such as runway incursion, land and holdshort operations, controlled flight into terrain, and human factorsissues also are included. Contents: Chapter 1 — IFR Operations inthe National Airspace System; Chapter 2 — Takeoffs and Departures;Chapter 3 — En Route Operations; Chapter 4 — Arrivals; Chapter 5Approaches; Chapter 6 — System Improvement Plans; Chapter 7 —Helicopter Instrument Procedures; Appendix A — Airborne NavigationDatabases; Appendix B — Staying Within Protected Airspace; AppendixC — Acronyms and Glossary
Aircraft Weight Balance Book 2
Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook, has been prepared inrecognition of the importance of weight and balance technology inconducting safe and efficient flight. The objective of thishandbook is twofold: to provide the Airframe and PowerplantMechanic (A&P) with the method of determining the empty weightand empty-weight center of gravity (EWCG) of an aircraft, and tofurnish the flight crew with information on loading and operatingthe aircraft to ensure its weight is within the allowable limit andthe center of gravity (CG) is within the allowable range. Thishandbook begins with the basic principle of aircraft weight andbalance control, emphasizing its importance and including examplesof documentation furnished by the aircraft manufacturer and by theFAA to ensure the aircraft weight and balance records contain theproper data. Procedures for the preparation and the actual weighingof an aircraft are described, as are the methods of determining thelocation of the empty-weight center of gravity (EWCG) relative toboth the datum and the mean aerodynamic chord (MAC). Loadingcomputations for general aviation aircraft are discussed, usingboth loading graphs and tables of weight and moment indexes.Information is included that allows an A&P mechanic orrepairman to determine the weight and center of gravity (CG)changes caused by repairs and alterations. This includesinstructions for conducting adverse-loaded CG checks, alsoexplaining the way to determine the amount and location of ballastneeded to bring the CG within allowable limits. The uniquerequirements for helicopter weight and balance control arediscussed, including the determination of lateral CG and the wayboth lateral and longitudinal CG change as fuel is consumed. Achapter is included giving the methods and examples of solvingweight and balance problems, using handheld electronic calculators,E6-B flight computers, and a dedicated electronic flightcomputer.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency ofthe United States Department of Transportation with authority toregulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S.(National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency",and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of theUnited States Department of Transportation. The Federal AviationAdministration's major roles include: Regulating U.S. commercialspace transportation. Regulating air navigation facilities'geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouraging anddeveloping civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology.Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates. Regulatingcivil aviation to promote safety, especially through local officescalled Flight Standards District Offices. Developing and operatinga system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil andmilitary aircraft. Researching and developing the National AirspaceSystem and civil aeronautics. Developing and carrying out programsto control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civilaviation.
Pilot Controller Glossary 2
This Glossary was compiled to promote a commonunderstanding of the terms used in the Air Traffic Control system.It includes those terms which are intended for pilot/controllercommunications. The definitions are primarily defined in anoperational sense applicable to both users and operators of theNational Airspace System. Use of the Glossary will preclude anymisunderstandings concerning the system’s design, function, andpurpose. About the Author: The Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) is an agency of the United States Department ofTransportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspectsof civil aviation in the U.S. (National Airworthiness Authority).The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the group under the name"Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1967when it became a part of the United States Department ofTransportation. The Federal Aviation Administration's major rolesinclude: Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation.Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and Flightinspection standards. Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics,including new aviation technology. Issuing, suspending, or revokingpilot certificates. Regulating civil aviation to promote safety,especially through local offices called Flight Standards DistrictOffices. Developing and operating a system of air traffic controland navigation for both civil and military aircraft. Researchingand developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics.Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise andother environmental effects of civil aviation.
Helicopter Flying Handbook 2
The Helicopter Flying Handbook is designed as a technical manualfor applicants who are preparing for their private, commercial, orflight instructor pilot certificates with a helicopter classrating. Certificated flight instructors may find this handbook avaluable training aid, since detailed coverage of aerodynamics,flight controls, systems, performance, flight maneuvers,emergencies, and aeronautical decision-making is included.This bookincludes the following topics:Introduction to theHelicopterAerodynamics of FlightFlight ControlsComponents,Sections, and SystemsRotorcraft Flight ManualWeight andBalanceHelicopter PerformanceGround Procedures and FlightPreparationsBasic Flight ManeuversAdvanced FlightManeuversEmergencies and HazardsAttitude Instrument FlyingNightOperationsEffective Aeronautical Decision-Making
Airworthiness Directives 2
Airworthiness Directives (Ads) are substantiveregulations issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inaccordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14CFR) part 39. Ads are issued when (1) an unsafe condition exists inthe product (i.e., aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, orappliance), and (2) the condition is likely to exist or develop inother products of the same type design. Once an AD is issued, noperson may operate a product to which the AD applies except inaccordance with the requirements of that AD. This manual providespolicy and guidance for the drafting, issuance, and distribution ofAds. It is intended to explain the laws that apply to Ads,procedures for writing an AD, and policies on key AD-relatedissues. About the Author: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation withauthority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation inthe U.S. (National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal AviationAct of 1958 created the group under the name "Federal AviationAgency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a partof the United States Department of Transportation. The FederalAviation Administration's major roles include: Regulating U.S.commercial space transportation. Regulating air navigationfacilities' geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouragingand developing civil aeronautics, including new aviationtechnology. Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates.Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially throughlocal offices called Flight Standards District Offices. Developingand operating a system of air traffic control and navigation forboth civil and military aircraft. Researching and developing theNational Airspace System and civil aeronautics. Developing andcarrying out programs to control aircraft noise and otherenvironmental effects of civil aviation.
Combat Training Pistols 9mm 1.0
It provides guidance on the operation andmarksmanship of the M9, 9-mm pistol and the M11, 9-mm pistol. Itreflects current Army standards in weapons qualification. It is aguide for the instructor to develop training programs, plans, andlessons that meet the objectives of the US Army Marksmanshipprogram for developing combat-effective marksmen. The Soldierdevelops confidence, knowledge, and skills by following theguidelines in this manual.
Handbook of Forensic Services 2
The successful investigation and prosecutionof crimes require, in most cases, the collection, preservation, andforensic analysis of evidence. Forensic analysis of evidence isoften crucial to determinations of guilt or innocence. The FBIHandbook of Forensic Services provides guidance and procedures forsafe and efficient methods of collecting, preserving, packaging,and shipping evidence and describes the forensic examinationsperformed by the FBI’s Laboratory Division and OperationalTechnology Division. All areas of forensic examinations covered ingreat detail, some of the major areas include Submitting Evidence,Evidence Examinations, Crime Scene Safety, and Crime SceneSearch.A sample of the books content: Search at questioned arson scenesfor the following items: candles, cigarettes, matchbooks, Molotovcocktails, fused chemical masses, or any electronic or mechanicaldevices an arsonist may have used. Also search for burn trails oncloth or paper, burn trails on carpeted or hardwood floors, and theremoval of personal property or commercial inventory. Ignitableliquids are volatile and easily lost through evaporation. Preserveevidence in airtight containers such as metal cans, glass jars, orheat-sealed plastic bags approved for fire debris. Do not fill thecontainers to the top. Pack to prevent breakage.This FBI handbook is the official guide to all law enforcementagencies in proper methods for investigating crime scenes.The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is an agency of theUnited States Department of Justice that serves as both a federalcriminal investigative body and an internal intelligence agency.The FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than200 categories of federal crime. The FBI's headquarters, the J.Edgar Hoover Building, is located in Washington, D.C. Fifty-sixfield offices are located in major cities throughout the UnitedStates as well as over 400 resident agencies in smaller cities andtowns across the country. The FBI's main goal is to protect anddefend the United States against terrorist and foreign intelligencethreats, to uphold and enforce the criminal laws of the UnitedStates, and to provide leadership and criminal justice services tofederal, state, municipal, and international agencies and partners.The FBI's mandate is established in Title 28 of the United StatesCode (U.S. Code), Section 533, which authorizes the AttorneyGeneral to "appoint officials to detect... crimes against theUnited States." Other federal statutes give the FBI the authorityand responsibility to investigate specific crimes.
Security Force Assistance 1.0
This field manual (FM) is the Army’s doctrinalpublication for security force assistance (SFA). It providesdoctrinal guidance and direction for how U.S. forces contribute toSFA. It focuses on the brigade combat team (BCT) conducting SFA andadvising foreign security forces. It is based on lessons learnedfrom previous advising efforts and recent combat operations with aview to the future. It supports the Army Education Systeminstruction on the theory and conduct of SFA. This FM provides theconceptual framework for conventional forces to conduct SFA withinthe construct of full spectrum operations, across the spectrum ofconflict. It addresses SFA at operational and tacticallevels.
Medical Evacuation 1.0
Medical Evacuation: Provides doctrine, as wellas techniques and procedures for conducting medical evacuation andmedical regulating operations. Medical evacuation encompasses boththe evacuation of Soldiers from the point of injury (POI) orwounding to a medical treatment facility (MTF) staffed and equippedto provide essential care in theater and further evacuation fromthe theater to provide definitive, rehabilitative, and convalescentcare in the continental United States (CONUS) and the movement ofpatients between MTFs or to staging facilities. Medical evacuationentails the provision of en route medical care; supports the jointhealth service support (JHSS) system; and links the continuum ofcare. In addition, it discusses the difference between medicalevacuation and casualty evacuation (CASEVAC), as well ascoordination requirements for and the use of nonmedicaltransportation assets to accomplish the CASEVAC missionThe United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is thefederal department charged with coordination and supervising allagencies and functions of the government relating directly tonational security and the military. The DOD is headquartered at thePentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at thePentagon publishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks andguidebooks on a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics andtechniques. The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth,consider that some this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years,thousands of man hours, and first hand operational experience. Alsomaterial in most of these manuals has been shared with otherMilitary Branches providing even greater depth of subject matter.Military Manuals from the Department of Defense are unedited byoutside individuals and or companies, this ensures the informationis complete, current, and accurate as the military intended. Listedbelow you will see some of the major departments or components ofthe Department of Defense. Here you will find just a few booktitles of the many sponsored works from each department. Departmentof the Air Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival; Air ForceHandbook; USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF Weapons HandlingManual; Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded Ordnance Booby-trapsUXO Recognition and Reporting Chart. Department of the Army: USArmy Survival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S. Army / SpecialOperations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook;Special Forces Medical Handbook; Military Mountaineering;Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions;Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army SpecialForces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal PatrolLeaders Handbook; Performance Maintenance During Continuous FlightOperations. United States Marine Corps: USMC 5.56MM, M16A2Technical Manual; U.S. Marine Corp M40A1 Sniper Rifle 7.62MM; U.S.Marine Guidebook; Close Combat Hand to Hand Fighting Marine Corps;Booby Traps Close Combat Urban; Counterinsurgency; USMC LandNavigation; Scouting and Patrolling; Combat Water Survival; MapReading; Sniper Counter Sniper.
Map Reading Land Navigation 1.0
The purpose of this field manual is to providea standardized source document for Army wide reference on mapreading and land navigation. This manual applies to every soldierin the Army regardless of service branch, MOS, or rank. This manualalso contains both doctrine and training guidance on thesesubjects. Part One addresses map reading and Part Two, landnavigation. The appendixes include a list of exportable trainingmaterials, a matrix of land navigation tasks, an introduction toorienteering, and a discussion of several devices that can assistthe soldier in land navigation.CHAPTER 1. TRAINING STRATEGY1-1. Building-Block Approach 1-2. Armywide Implementation 1-3. SafetyCHAPTER 2. MAPS2-1. Definition 2-2. Purpose2-3. Procurement 2-4. Security 2-5. Care 2-6. Categories2-7. Military Map Substitutes2-8. Standards of Accuracy CHAPTER 3. MARGINAL INFORMATION AND SYMBOLS3-1. Marginal Information on a Military Map3-2. Additional Notes 3-3. Topographic Map Symbols 3-4. Military Symbols3-5. Colors Used on a Military MapCHAPTER 4. GRIDS4-1. Reference System4-2. Geographic Coordinates4-3. Military Grids4-4. United States Army Military Grid Reference System 4-5. Locate a Point Using Grid Coordinates 4-6. Locate a Point Using the US Army Military GridReference System4-7. Grid Reference Box4-8. Other Grid Systems 4-9. Protection of Map Coordinates and LocationsCHAPTER 5. SCALE AND DISTANCE5-1. Representative Fraction5-2. Graphic (Bar) Scales 5-3. Other MethodsCHAPTER 6. DIRECTION6-1. Methods of Expressing Direction 6-2. Base Lines 6-3. Azimuths 6-4. Grid Azimuths6-5. Protractor6-6. Declination Diagram 6-7. Intersection6-8. Resection6-9. Modified Resection 6-10. Polar CoordinatesCHAPTER 7. OVERLAYS7-1. Purpose7-2. Map Overlay 7-3. Aerial Photograph Overlay CHAPTER 8. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS8-1. Comparison With Maps 8-2. Types8-3. Types of Film 8-4. Numbering and Titling Information8-5. Scale Determination8-6. Indexing 8-7. Orienting of Photograph8-8. Point Designation Grid8-9. Identification of Photograph Features8-10. StereovisionCHAPTER 9. NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT AND METHODS9-1. Types of Compasses9-2. Lensatic Compass9-3. Compass Handling 9-4. Using a Compass9-5. Field-Expedient Methods9-6. Global Positioning SystemCHAPTER 10. ELEVATION AND RELIEF10-1. Definitions10-2. Methods of Depicting Relief10-3. Contour Intervals10-4. Types of Slopes 10-5. Percentage of Slope10-6. Terrain Features 10-7. Interpretation of Terrain Features 10-8. Profiles CHAPTER 11. TERRAIN ASSOCIATION11-1. Orienting the Map 11-2. Locations11-3. Terrain Association Usage 11-4. Tactical Considerations11-5. Movement and Route Selection 11-6. Navigation Methods11-7. Night NavigationCHAPTER 12. MOUNTED LAND NAVIGATION12-1. Principles12-2. Navigator's Duties 12-3. Movement 12-4. Terrain Association Navigation 12-5. Dead Reckoning Navigation 12-6. Stabilized Turret Alignment Navigation12-7. Combination Navigation CHAPTER 13. NAVIGATION IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF TERRAIN13-1. Desert Terrain 13-2. Mountain Terrain 13-3. Jungle Terrain 13-4. Arctic Terrain13-5. Urban Areas CHAPTER 14. UNIT SUSTAINMENT14-1. Set Up a Sustainment Program 14-2. Set Up a Train-the-Trainer Program 14-3. Set Up a Land Navigation CourseAPPENDIX A. FIELD SKETCHINGAPPENDIX B. MAP FOLDING TECHNIQUES APPENDIX C. UNITS OF MEASURE AND CONVERSION FACTORS APPENDIX D. JOINT OPERATIONS GRAPHICSAPPENDIX E. EXPORTABLE TRAINING MATERIALAPPENDIX F.ORIENTEERINGAPPENDIX G. M2 COMPASSAPPENDIX H. ADDITIONAL AIDSAPPENDIX I. FOREIGN MAPSAPPENDIX J. GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM APPENDIX K. PRECISION LIGHTWEIGHT GLOBAL POSITIONINGSYSTEM RECEIVER GLOSSARYREFERENCES
Survival, Evasion and Recovery 2
SURVIVAL, EVASION, AND RECOVERY; is the finestsingle source for self-reliance for all extreme circumstances. Amust for anyone who wants to know how to survive in primitiveconditions. The book is very straightforward with many pictures anduser-friendly illustrations, written in easy to understandlanguage. This is just some of the survival information that thisbook provides: All-climates: arctic, tropics, temperate forest,savannah or desert. All-terrain survival tactics. The Will toSurvive. Identify poisonous snakes, as well as edible andnon-edible plants. Survival Medicine. Wilderness medicine.Techniques on first aid. Survival in the hottest or coldest ofclimates. Survival Planning. Make polluted water potable. How tofind water. Ways to trap and collection techniques of water. Coversnavigation and compass use. Find direction using the sun and stars.Weapons and Tools. Recognizing signs of land when lost at sea.Building life-saving shelters. Traps and snares. How to preparewild game to be cooked also preserving food. All types of firemaking. Water Crossings. Find direction using the sun and stars.Physical and mental fitness. Disaster preparedness. Again this isjust some of the survival information is this book! S - Size up thesituation, surroundings, physical condition, equipment. U - Use allyour senses R - Remember where you are. V - Vanquish fear andpanic. I - Improvise and improve. V - Value living. A - Act likethe natives. L - Live by your wits. 1. Immediate Actions a. Assessimmediate situation. THINK BEFORE YOU ACT! b. Take action toprotect yourself from nuclear, biological, or chemical hazards(Chapter IX). c. Seek a concealed site. d. Assess medicalcondition; treat as necessary (Chapter V). e. Sanitize uniform ofpotentially compromising information. f. Sanitize area; hideequipment you are leaving. g. Apply personal camouflage. h. Moveaway from concealed site, zigzag pattern recommended. i. Useterrain to advantage, communication, and concealment. j. Find ahole-up site.The United States Department of Defense (DOD) is the federaldepartment charged with coordination and supervising all agenciesand functions of the government relating directly to nationalsecurity and the military. The DOD is headquartered at the Pentagonin Arlington, Virginia. The Military Departments at the Pentagonpublishes some of the very best manuals, handbooks and guidebookson a wide range of topics; teaching skills, tactics and techniques.The content of these manuals are unmatched in depth, consider thatsome this knowledge is drawn from hundreds of years, thousands ofman hours, and first hand operational experience. Also material inmost of these manuals has been shared with other Military Branchesproviding even greater depth of subject matter. Military Manualsfrom the Department of Defense are unedited by outside individualsand or companies, this ensures the information is complete,current, and accurate as the military intended. Listed below youwill see some of the major departments or components of theDepartment of Defense. Here you will find just a few book titles ofthe many sponsored works from each department. Department of theAir Force: U.S. Air Force Aircrew Survival; Air Force Handbook;USAF Military Working Dog Program; USAF Weapons Handling Manual;Airport Signs and Markings; Unexploded Ordnance Booby-traps UXORecognition and Reporting Chart. Department of the Army: US ArmySurvival Manual FM 21-76; Survival Skills U.S. Army / SpecialOperations, Tactics, Techniques, and Skills Guide; Ranger Handbook;Special Forces Medical Handbook; Military Mountaineering;Boobytraps Army Instruction Manual; Explosives and Demolitions;Guerrilla Warfare; Army Hand to Hand Combat; U.S. Army SpecialForces Handbook; Survival Evasion and Recovery; Military First Aid.Department of the Navy: Seabee Combat Handbook; Manual of NavalPreventive Medicine; USN Diving Manual; U.S. Navy Seal Patrol
MEDICAL LEADERS HANDBOOK 1.0
This field manual (FM) provides information onthe structure and operation of all medical platoons and medicalsections that are organic to combat and combat support (CS)battalions and squadrons. It is directed toward the medical platoonleader and medical platoon members. The tactics, techniques, andprocedures (TTP) provided are not all-inclusive. They provide a wayof performing a particular mission, but may require modificationbased on mission, enemy, terrain, troops, time available, andcivilian considerations (METT-TC). This publication providesinformation on the organization of the division and how medicalplatoons and sections organic to division units provide combathealth support (CHS). It outlines the responsibilities of medicalplatoon/section leaders. It provides definitive information onplanning, rehearsing, and conducting CHS at Echelon I. It providesTTP for directing, controlling, and managing CHS at the medicalplatoon/section level. It describes the troop-leading proceduresfor CHS operations and identifies interface and coordinationrequirements with other brigade medical elements.
Airframe Maintenance Manual 2 2
The Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook–Airframe(FAA-H-8083-31) Volume 2 is one of a series of three handbooks forpersons preparing for certification as an airframe or powerplantmechanic. It is intended that this handbook provide the basicinformation on principles, fundamentals, and technical proceduresin the subject matter areas relating to the airframe rating. It isdesigned to aid students enrolled in a formal course ofinstruction, as well as the individual who is studying on his orher own.This book includes the following topics:Chapter 10 AircraftInstrument SystemsChapter 11 Communication and NavigationChapter 12Hydraulic and Pneumatic Power SystemsChapter 13 Landing GearSystemsChapter 14 Fuel SystemChapter 15 Ice and RainProtectionChapter 16 Cabin Environmental Control SystemsChapter 17Fire Protection Systems
Flight Instructor Instrument 2
Flight Instructor Instrument Practical TestStandards for Airplane and Helicopter FAA-S-8081-9D with Change 1:Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61specifies the areas in which knowledge and skill must bedemonstrated by the applicant before the issuance of a flightinstructor certificate with the associated category and classratings. The CFRs provide the flexibility to permit the FAA topublish practical test standards containing the AREAS OF OPERATIONand specific TASKS in which competency shall be demonstrated. TheFAA will revise this book whenever it is determined that changesare needed in the interest of safety. Adherence to the provisionsof the regulations and the practical test standards is mandatoryfor the evaluation of flight instructor applicants.
Transport Pilot Rating Test 2
Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft TypeRating Practical Test Standards for Airplane FAA-S-8081-5F withchange 1, 2, 3, & 4: Last Change number 4 date: 4/4/2012; TheAirline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating—Airplane PracticalTest Standards (PTS) book has been published by the FederalAviation Administration (FAA) to establish the standards forairline transport pilot and aircraft type rating practical testsfor airplanes. FAA inspectors, designated pilot examiners, andcheck airmen (referred to as examiners throughout the remainingpractical test standard) must conduct practical tests in compliancewith these standards. Flight instructors and applicants should findthese standards helpful in practical test preparation. MajorEnhancements to Version FAA-S-8081-5F  Corrected web addresses(URLs).  Updated and added references.  Added icing conditionsand hazard awareness references, emphasis, and evaluation elements. Clarified multiengine requirements and results.  Clarifiedpossible results if applicant refuses to perform a task or element. Added traffic awareness to special emphasis area.  Clarifiedwhen a medical certificate is required.  Clarified requirement forinflight shutdown, feathering, if propeller-driven, and restartwhile airborne.  Standardized “knowledge” terminology.  Addedsingle pilot resource management (SRM).  Clarified intent forchecklist accomplishment in crew-served airplanes.  Added “NavalVessel Protection” and “No Wake” zones in seaplane area.  Added“Applicant Notes:” to clarify intent, scope, and range of theexaminer's authorization to conduct the evaluation.  Added “bank”to unusual attitudes for clarification.  Added “displays” to taskswhere appropriate to include evaluation of newer avionics and usageof panel multifunction displays.  Clarified intent for raw dataapproaches to be flown as much as possible by reference to standbyor backup instrumentation.  Revised verbiage to allow “approvedmethod” in addition to manufacturer's method concerning checklistperformance.
Instrument Rating Test Guide 1
Instrument Rating Knowledge Test Guide, provides informationforpreparing you to take the Instrument Rating Knowledge Test.Contents:IntroductionKnowledge Test Eligibility RequirementsKnowledge Areas on the TestsDescriptions of the TestsTest RegistrationTaking a Knowledge TestUse of Test Aids and MaterialsDyslexic Testing ProceduresCheating or Other Unauthorized ConductTest ReportsRetesting ProceduresTraining and Testing Publications and General InformationAdvisory CircularsAirworthiness DirectivesCode of Federal RegulationsComputer Testing SupplementsKnowledge Test CentersKnowledge Test QuestionsKnowledge Test StatisticsLearning Statement Reference GuidePractical Test StandardsTraining HandbooksType Certificate Data SheetsAbout The Author: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) isanagency of the United States Department of Transportationwithauthority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviationinthe U.S. (National Airworthiness Authority). The FederalAviationAct of 1958 created the group under the name "FederalAviationAgency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when itbecame a partof the United States Department of Transportation. TheFederalAviation Administration's major roles include: RegulatingU.S.commercial space transportation. Regulating airnavigationfacilities' geometry and Flight inspection standards.Encouragingand developing civil aeronautics, including newaviationtechnology. Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilotcertificates.Regulating civil aviation to promote safety,especially throughlocal offices called Flight Standards DistrictOffices. Developingand operating a system of air traffic controland navigation forboth civil and military aircraft. Researching anddeveloping theNational Airspace System and civil aeronautics.Developing andcarrying out programs to control aircraft noise andotherenvironmental effects of civil aviation.
Nuclear Consequence Management 1
Chemical, Biological, Radiological, andNuclear Consequence Management Tactics, Techniques, and Proceduresfor Military and Civilian Agencies: This publication is designedfor chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN)responders who plan and conduct CBRN consequence management (CM)operations in domestic, foreign, or theater operationalenvironments, to include military installations.The purpose of this publication is to provide key agencies,staffs and military members with a key reference for planning andconducting CBRN CM. It provides the tools for CBRN responders toeffectively manage the consequences of a CBRN incident. It also mayserve as a reference for development and refining of training andexercises.Table of contents;executive summary,Chapter 1chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear aspects ofconsequence management.;background;terms of reference;goals;operational environments;task;chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear consequencemanagement process;joint operational phases for consequence management;Chapter 2planning;planning overview;operational environment assessment; capability assessment;vulnerability assessment;risk assessment;deliberate site assessment;health service support assessment;Chapter 3preparation one;background;vulnerability reduction measures;chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear consequencemanagement education and training;coordinating, monitoring, and reporting requirements;health service support;conducting response exercises;evaluate capabilities and identify remaining broaderabilities;national special security events;Chapter 4response;background;incident response overview;chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear responder;response environment;joint operational phases for consequence management;chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear responseoperations;health service support response activity;transition to recovery operations;Chapter 5recovery;background chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclearconsequence management decontamination;health service support recovery operations;logistics recovery operations;transition operations;redeployment operations;Appendix Cresponse tactics, techniques, and procedures;command and control;incident site assessment;incident site framework;health service support;logistics;Appendix Drecovery tactics, techniques, and procedures;decontamination operations;emergency decontamination;technical decontamination;mass casualty decontamination;health service support;logistics;transition operations;references;glossary.
Seaplane Helicopter Operations 2
SEAPLANE, SKIPLANE, and FLOAT/SKI EQUIPPEDHELICOPTER OPERATIONS HANDBOOK: This operational handbookintroduces the basic skills necessary for piloting seaplanes,skiplanes, and helicopters equipped with floats or skis. It isdeveloped by the Flight Standards Service, Airman Testing StandardsBranch, in cooperation with various aviation educators andindustry. This handbook is primarily intended to assist pilots whoalready hold private or commercial certificates and who arelearning to fly seaplanes, skiplanes, or helicopters equipped forwater or ski operations. It is also beneficial to rated seaplanepilots who wish to improve their proficiency, pilots preparing forflights using ski equipped aircraft, and flight instructors engagedin the instruction of both student and transitioning pilots. Itintroduces the future seaplane or skiplane pilot to the realm ofwater operations and cold weather operations, and providesinformation on the performance of procedures required for theaddition of a sea class rating in airplanes. CONTENTS: CHAPTER1—Rules, Regulations, and Aids for Navigation; CHAPTER 2—Principlesof Seaplanes; CHAPTER 3—Water Characteristics and Seaplane BaseOperations; CHAPTER 4—Seaplane Operations – Preflight and Takeoffs;CHAPTER 5 Performance; CHAPTER 6—Seaplane Operations – Landings;CHAPTER 7—Skiplane Operations; CHAPTER 8—Emergency Open SeaOperations; CHAPTER 9—Float and Ski Equipped Helicopters; Glossaryand Index.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of theUnited States Department of Transportation with authority toregulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S.(National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency",and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of theUnited States Department of Transportation. The Federal AviationAdministration's major roles include: Regulating U.S. commercialspace transportation. Regulating air navigation facilities'geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouraging anddeveloping civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology.Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates. Regulatingcivil aviation to promote safety, especially through local officescalled Flight Standards District Offices. Developing and operatinga system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil andmilitary aircraft. Researching and developing the National AirspaceSystem and civil aeronautics. Developing and carrying out programsto control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civilaviation.