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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer 7.4
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: World classic books This is a wonderful story aboutthe adventures of a little boy from a small town on the MississippiRiver. The hero of the book Tom Sawyer has become a model restlessboy, whom they want to be like all the guys who read this book.Adults, too, should read this book, and to remember his childhood.Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
Jane Eyre 7.3
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series:World classic books This novel was published on 16 October 1847.Primarily of the bildungsroman genre, Jane Eyre follows theemotions and experiences of its eponymous character, including hergrowth to adulthood, and her love for Mr. Rochester, the byronicmaster of fictitious Thornfield Hall. In its internalization of theaction — the focus is on the gradual unfolding of Jane's moral andspiritual sensibility and all the events are colored by aheightened intensity that was previously the domain of poetry — thenovel revolutionized the art of fiction. Charlotte Brontë has beencalled the 'first historian of the private consciousness' and theliterary ancestor of writers like Joyce and Proust. The novelcontains elements of social criticism, with a strong sense ofmorality at its core, but is nonetheless a novel many considerahead of its time given the individualistic character of Jane andthe novel's exploration of classism, sexuality, religion, andproto-feminism. Cover book and icon is a fragment of frame movie"Jane Eyre" by Cary Joji Fukunaga and starring Mia Wasikowska. Lookfor other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
Hamlet by William Shakespeare 7.4
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William ShakespeareSeries: The 10 Greatest Books of All Timehttp://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Hamlet is a tragedy by WilliamShakespeare, believed to have been written between 1599 and 1601.The play, set in Denmark, recounts how Prince Hamlet exacts revengeon his uncle Claudius, who has murdered Hamlet's father, the King,and then taken the throne and married Hamlet's mother. The playvividly charts the course of real and feigned madness—fromoverwhelming grief to seething rage—and explores themes oftreachery, revenge, incest, and moral corruption. It has beentheorized that Hamlet is based on the legend of Amleth, preservedby 13th-century chronicler Saxo Grammaticus in his Gesta Danorum assubsequently retold by 16th-century scholar François deBelleforest. Shakespeare may also have drawn on or perhaps writtenan earlier (hypothetical) Elizabethan play known today as theUr-Hamlet. He almost certainly created the title role for RichardBurbage, the leading tragedian of Shakespeare's time. In the 400years since, the role has been performed by highly acclaimed actorsand actresses from each successive age. — Excerpted from Wikipedia,the free encyclopedia. Cover is the picture of painter EugèneDelacroix (1798–1863) App icon is the Stataue of Shakespeare'sHamlet, Stratford-upon-Avon, by Lord Ronald Gower Look for otherbooks on our site http://books.virenter.com/
Alice in Wonderland 7.4
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll VirtualEntertainment, 2013 Series: Tales classic books Illustrations byPeter Newell, Charles Robinson, Arthur Rackham This book (commonlyshortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written byEnglish author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym LewisCarroll. It tells of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbithole into a fantasy world (Wonderland) populated by peculiarcreatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lastingpopularity with adults as well as children. Look for other books onour site: http://books.virenter.com
The Great Gatsby 2.4
The Great Gatsby by F.Scott FitzgeraldSeries: The 10 Greatest Books of All Timehttp://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29Virtual Entertainment, 2013The story takes place in 1922, during the Roaring Twenties, thepost-World War I prosperous time in the United States. Described asthe "ironic tale of life on Long Island at a time when gin was thenational drink and sex the national obsession," it receivedcritical acclaim. In it Mr. Fitzgerald was at his best...his"ability to catch the flavor of a period, the fragrance of a night,a snatch of old song". The book is widely regarded as a "GreatAmerican Novel" and a literary classic, capturing the essence of anera and the post-war "carefree madness" of a nation hungry forlife. The Modern Library named it the second best English languagenovel of the 20th Century.In a 1924 letter, Fitzgerald said, "the burden of The Great Gatsbywas the loss of those illusions that give such color to the worldthat you don't care whether things are true or false as long asthey partake of the magical glory."— Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.Cover and App icon is a copy the cover of the first edition,1925Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com/
Romeo and Juliet 7.2.2
William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet Virtual Entertainment, 2015Series: World classic books Cover is the picture of the painterFrank Dicksee (1853–1928). Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written byWilliam Shakespeare early in his career about two youngstar-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feudingfamilies. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during hislifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequentlyperformed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded asarchetypal young lovers. Romeo and Juliet belongs to a tradition oftragic romances stretching back to antiquity. Its plot is based onan Italian tale, translated into verse as The Tragical History ofRomeus and Juliet by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose inPalace of Pleasure by William Painter in 1567. Shakespeare borrowedheavily from both but, to expand the plot, developed supportingcharacters, particularly Mercutio and Paris. Believed to have beenwritten between 1591 and 1595, the play was first published in aquarto version in 1597. This text was of poor quality, and latereditions corrected it, bringing it more in line with Shakespeare'soriginal. Shakespeare's use of his poetic dramatic structure,especially effects such as switching between comedy and tragedy toheighten tension, his expansion of minor characters, and his use ofsub-plots to embellish the story, has been praised as an early signof his dramatic skill. The play ascribes different poetic forms todifferent characters, sometimes changing the form as the characterdevelops. Romeo, for example, grows more adept at the sonnet overthe course of the play. — From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
A Tale of Two Cities 7.2.2
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens Virtual Entertainment, 2013Series: Historic classic books A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is anovel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and duringthe French Revolution. With well over 200 million copies sold, itranks among the most famous works in the history of fictionalliterature. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy 7.3
Anna Karenina by Graf Leo Tolstoy Series: The 10 Greatest Books ofAll Time Virtual Entertainment, 2013 The novel is currentlyenjoying popularity, as demonstrated by a recent poll of 125contemporary authors by J. Peder Zane, published in 2007 in "TheTop Ten" in Time(http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29),which declared that Anna Karenina is the "greatest novel everwritten". Anna Karenina is the tragedy of married aristocrat andsocialite Anna Karenina and her affair with the affluent CountVronsky. The story starts when she arrives in the midst of a familybroken up by her brother's unbridled womanizing—something thatprefigures her own later situation, though with less tolerance forher by others. A bachelor, Vronsky is willing to marry her if shewould agree to leave her husband Karenin, a government official,but she is vulnerable to the pressures of Russian social norms, herown insecurities and Karenin's indecision. Although Vronsky andAnna go to Italy where they can be together, they have troublemaking friends. Back in Russia, she is shunned, becoming furtherisolated and anxious, while Vronsky pursues his social life.Despite Vronsky's reassurances she grows increasingly possessiveand paranoid about his imagined infidelity, fears losing control. Aparallel story within the novel is of Levin, a country landownerwho desires to marry Kitty, sister to Dolly and sister-in-law toAnna's brother Oblonsky. Levin has to propose twice before Kittyaccepts. The novel details Levin's difficulties managing hisestate, his eventual marriage, and personal issues, until the birthof Levin's first child. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the freeencyclopedia. Cover is the picture of the painter Henrich Manizer(1847-1925). App icon is a frame with Keira Knightley of film "AnnaKarenina" 2012, Director: Joe Wright. Look for other books on oursite http://books.virenter.com/
com.virenter.books.AOUMVFRQHQBAGAGFO 7.2.2
The Invisible Man by Herbert George Wells Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: Fiction classic books The Invisible Man is a 1897science fiction novel, originally serialized in Pearson's Magazine.The Invisible Man of the title is "Griffin", a scientist whotheorizes that if a person's refractive index is changed to exactlythat of air and his body does not absorb or reflect light, then hewill not be visible. He successfully carries out this procedure onhimself, but cannot become visible again, becoming mentallyunstable as a result. — Excerpted from The Invisible Man onWikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
The Tragedy of Macbeth 7.2.2
William Shakespeare The Tragedy of Macbeth Virtual Entertainment,2014 Series: World classic books The Tragedy of Macbeth is amongthe most popular of William Shakespeare's plays, as well as hisshortest tragedy. It is frequently performed at professional andcommunity theatres around the world. This play is seen as anarchetypal tale of the dangers of the lust for power and betrayalof friends. It is loosely based upon the historical account of KingMacbeth of Scotland by the Scottish philosopher Hector Boece.Boece's account flattered the antecedents of his patron, King JamesVI of Scotland (also known as King James I of England), and greatlymaligned the real-life Macbeth, the King of Scots. — Excerpted fromMacbeth on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other bookson our site http://books.virenter.com
The Secret Garden 7.2.2
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett Virtual Entertainment,2016 Series: World classic books This book was initially publishedin serial format starting in the autumn of 1910, and was firstpublished in its entirety in 1911. It is now one of Burnett's mostpopular novels, and is considered to be a classic of Englishchildren's literature. Several stage and film adaptations have beenproduced. -- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Look for otherbooks on our site http://books.virenter.com
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky 7.3
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky translated by Eva Martin VirtualEntertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books This novel writtenby the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in1868. Dostoevsky's motives for writing The Idiot stem from hisdesire to depict the "positively good man". This man is naturallylikened to Christ in many ways. Dostoevsky uses Myshkin'sintroduction to the Petersburg society as a way to contrast thenature of Russian society at the time and the isolation andinnocence of this good man. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com/
com.virenter.books.AOUFNFPTKCOCCWJD 7.2.2
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Virtual Entertainment, 2013Series: World classic books This novel follows the maincharacter Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with issuesof manners, upbringing, morality, education,and marriage in the society of the landedgentry of early 19th-century England. Elizabeth is thesecond of five daughters of a country gentleman living near thefictional town of Meryton in Hertfordshire, near London.Illustration by C. E. Brock for the 1895 edition of Jane Austen'snovel Pride and Prejudice. Icon is a fragment of picture by JohnFrederick Lloyd Strevens. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Dracula by Bram Stoker 7.2.2
Dracula by Bram Stoker Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: Worldadventure classic books Dracula has been attributed to manyliterary genres including horror fiction, the gothic novel andinvasion literature. Although author Bram Stoker did not invent thevampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires hasbeen singularly responsible for scores of theatrical and movieinterpretations throughout the 20th century. — Excerpted fromDracula on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other bookson our site http://books.virenter.com
Vanity Fair 7.3
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: World classic books This novel by English authorWilliam Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847–48, satirizingsociety in early 19th-century Britain. The book's title comes fromJohn Bunyan's allegorical story The Pilgrim's Progress, firstpublished in 1678 and still widely read at the time of Thackeray'snovel. "Vanity Fair" refers to a stop along the pilgrim's progress:a never-ending fair held in a town called Vanity, which is meant torepresent man's sinful attachment to worldly things. The novel isnow considered a classic, and has inspired several filmadaptations, the most recent being the 2004 film starring ReeseWitherspoon. In 2003, Vanity Fair was listed on the BBC's The BigRead poll of the UK's "best-loved novel". Look for other books onour site http://books.virenter.com
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 7.4
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Series: The 10Greatest Books of All Timehttp://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29Virtual Entertainment, 2013 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is anovel, first published in England in December 1884 and in theUnited States in February 1885. Commonly named among the GreatAmerican Novels, the work is among the first in major Americanliterature to be written in the vernacular, characterized by localcolor regionalism. The book is noted for its colorful descriptionof people and places along the Mississippi River. Satirizing aSouthern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twentyyears before the work was published, The Adventures of HuckleberryFinn is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes,particularly racism. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the freeencyclopedia. Cover and App icon is the picture of the painterEdward Winsor Kemble. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com/
Persuasion 7.2.2
Persuasion by Jane Austen Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: Worldclassic books Persuasion is Jane Austen's last completed novel.More than seven years prior to the events in the novel, Anne Elliotfalls in love with a handsome young naval officer named FrederickWentworth, who is intelligent and ambitious, but poor. Sir Walter,Anne's father and lord of the family estate of Kellynch, and herolder sister Elizabeth are dissatisfied with her choice,maintaining that he is not distinguished enough for their family.Her older friend and mentor, Lady Russell, acting in place ofAnne's deceased mother, persuades her to break off the match. Now,aged 27 and still unmarried, Anne re-encounters her former fiancewhen his sister and brother-in-law, the Crofts, take out a lease onKellynch. Wentworth, now a captain, is wealthy from wartimevictories in the Royal Navy and from prize-money for capturingenemy ships. However, he has not forgiven Anne for her rejection ofhim. The self-interested machinations of Anne's father, her oldersister Elizabeth, Elizabeth's friend Mrs. Clay, and William Elliot(Anne's cousin and her father's heir) constitute importantsubplots. Jane Austen (16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was anEnglish novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among thelanded gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely readwriters in English literature, her realism and biting socialcommentary cementing her historical importance among scholars andcritics. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.Illustrations by Charles Edmund Brock (1909) Cover is one ofpublish J. M. Dent&Co (London), E. P. Dutton&Co (New-York),1909 Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
Wuthering Heights Emily Brontë 7.2.2
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë The 1910 John Murray's editionVirtual Entertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books WutheringHeights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous secondedition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novelcomes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the storycentres (as an adjective, wuthering is a Yorkshire word referringto turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of theall-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love betweenHeathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and how this unresolved passioneventually destroys them and many around them. Look for other bookson our site http://books.virenter.com/
Around the World in 80 Days 7.2.2
Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne, translated by GeoMakepeace Towle (1873) Virtual Entertainment, 2016 Series: Worldadventure classic books This book is an adventure novel in whichPhileas Fogg of London and his newly-employed French valetPassepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a£20,000 wager set by his Fogg's friends at the Reform Club. —Excerpted from Around the World in Eighty Days on Wikipedia, thefree encyclopedia. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy 7.3
War and Peace by Graf Leo Tolstoy Series: The 10 Greatest Books ofAll Timehttp://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29Virtual Entertainment, 2013 War and Peace delineates in graphicdetail events surrounding the French invasion of Russia, and theimpact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society, as seen throughthe eyes of five Russian aristocratic families. The work is epic inscale and is regarded as one of the most important works of worldliterature. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Lookfor other books on our site http://books.virenter.com/
com.virenter.books.aaaao 7.2.2
Charles Dickens OLIVER TWIST OR THE PARISH BOY'S PROGRESS VirtualEntertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books This is the secondnovel by Charles Dickens, and was first published as a serial1837–39. The story is of the orphan Oliver Twist, who starts hislife in a workhouse and is then sold into apprenticeship with anundertaker. He escapes from there and travels to London, where hemeets the Artful Dodger, a member of a gang of juvenile pickpocketsled by the elderly criminal Fagin. -- From Wikipedia, the freeencyclopedia Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Little Women 7.3
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott Virtual Entertainment, 2012Series: World classic books Little Women is a book that revolvesaround the lives of four March sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy andtheir mother Marmee. The March sisters struggle against povertywhile their father is away serving as a doctor during the CivilWar. They suffer many privations but still remain happy and makethe best of what they have got. Its a story of a tightly knit andloving family who face many challenges in life but stick togetherno matter what. The story charts the childhood games, problems,their domestic adventures, their efforts to increase the familyincome and their friendship with the neighbouring Laurence familyand lessons of young girls becoming young women. The book exploresthe sisters’ relationship with eachother and with their mother,love and care for their father, and their emotional connection withtheir friends and acquaintances. Its a very nice story whichperfectly depicts the feelings of young girls. It’s a novel aboutfamily bonding, love, friendship, patience, tolerance, and theagony of loss of loved ones. Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 –March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for thenovel Little Women. Little Women was set in the Alcott family home,Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, and published in 1868.This novel is loosely based on her childhood experiences with herthree sisters. Chapters 24-47 were first published several yearslater than the original Little Women (in the UK under the titleGood Wives), but the two works are now usually published togetherin one volume. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
The Lost World 7.3
The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle Virtual Entertainment, 2013Series: Fiction classic books Image by Rizzithegreat credit:commons.wikimedia.org Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0International license. This novel concerning an expedition to aplateau in the Amazon basin of South America where prehistoricanimals (dinosaurs and other extinct creatures) still survive. Thenovel also describes a war between indigenous people and a vicioustribe of ape-like creatures. — Excerpted from The Lost World onWikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
The Count of Monte Cristo 7.4
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas Virtual Entertainment,2015 Series: World adventure classic books This book is aworld-famous adventure novel. The story takes place in France,Italy, and islands in the Mediterranean during the historicalevents of 1815–1839: the era of the Bourbon Restoration through thereign of Louis-Philippe of France. It begins just before theHundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after hisexile). The historical setting is a fundamental element of thebook, an adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope,justice, vengeance, mercy, and forgiveness. It focuses on a man whois wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune,and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for hisimprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences forthe innocent as well as the guilty. In addition, it is a story thatinvolves romance, loyalty, betrayal, and selfishness, shownthroughout the story as characters slowly reveal their true innernature. -- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia translated byunknown translator illustrated by Alexandre Dumas Look for otherbooks on our site http://books.virenter.com
Three Men in a Boat 7.2.2
Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. JeromeVirtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: World classic books This bookis a humorous account of a boating holiday on the Thames betweenKingston and Oxford. The book was initially intended to be aserious travel guide, with accounts of local history along theroute, but the humorous elements took over to the point where theserious and somewhat sentimental passages seem a distraction to thecomic novel. One of the most praised things about Three Men in aBoat is how undated it appears to modern readers – the jokes seemfresh and witty even today. — Excerpted from Three Men in a Boat onWikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Lady Chatterley's Lover 2.4
Lady Chatterley's Loverby D. H. LawrenceVirtual Entertainment, 2013Series: Spicy classic booksLady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, firstpublished in 1928. The first edition was printed privately inFlorence, Italy with assistance from Pino Orioli; it could not bepublished openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. (A privateedition was issued by Inky Stephensen's Mandrake Press in 1929.)The book soon became notorious for its story of the physicalrelationship between a working-class man and an aristocratic woman,its explicit descriptions of sex, and its use of then-unprintablewords.The story is said to have originated from events in Lawrence'sown unhappy domestic life, and he took inspiration for the settingsof the book from Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, where he grew up.According to some critics, the fling of Lady Ottoline Morrell with"Tiger", a young stonemason who came to carve plinths for hergarden statues, also influenced the story. Lawrence at one timeconsidered calling the novel Tenderness and made significantalterations to the text and story in the process of itscomposition. It has been published in three different versions.David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literarycritic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence.— Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.Look for other books on the site http://books.virenter.com
The Stories by Anton Chekhov 7.2.2
The Stories by Anton Chekhov Virtual Entertainment, 2013Series: The 10 Greatest Books of All Time Anton Pavlovich Chekhov(29 January 1860 – 15 July 1904) was a Russian physician, dramatistand author who is considered to be among the greatest writers ofshort stories in history.[Encyclopædia Britannica] His career as adramatist produced four classics and his best short stories areheld in high esteem by writers and critics. Chekhov practised as adoctor throughout most of his literary career: "Medicine is mylawful wife", he once said, "and literature is my mistress." —Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Cover and App iconis the portrait of Anton Chekhov by Osip Braz (1873 - 1936) Lookfor other books on our site http://books.virenter.com/
com.virenter.books.AOUCUFFNSQVADAWWM 7.2.2
Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There by LewisCarroll Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: Tales classic books Itis the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Thethemes and settings of Through the Looking-Glass make it a kind ofmirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in thewarm month of May (4 May), uses frequent changes in size as a plotdevice, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opensindoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on 4November (the day before Guy Fawkes Night), uses frequent changesin time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on theimagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, includingopposites, time running backwards, and so on. WITH FIFTYILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN TENNIEL Look for other books on our site:http://books.virenter.com
Pygmalion by Bernard Shaw 7.2.2
Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw Virtual Entertainment, 2013Series: World classic books It tells the story of Henry Higgins, aprofessor of phonetics, who makes a bet with his friend ColonelPickering that he can turn a Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle,into a refined society lady merely by teaching her how to speakwith an upper class accent and training her in etiquette. In theprocess, Higgins and Doolittle grow close, but she ultimatelyrejects his domineering ways and marries Freddy Eynsford-Hill, ayoung but poor gentleman. — Excerpted from Pygmalion (play) onWikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Cover and icon are drawing ofEliza Doolittle, a character from George Bernard Shaw's playPygmalion, by George Luks (1867-1933) Look for other books on oursite http://books.virenter.com
com.virenter.books.AOUNZFANDMMINNJQ 7.2.2
Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: World adventure classic books This novel describes theill-fated voyage of the whaling ship Pequod to find and destroy theeponymous white whale, driven by the obsessive Captain Ahab. Thelanguage is highly symbolic and many themes run throughout thework. The narrator's reflections, along with complex descriptionsof the grueling work of whaling and personalities of his shipmates,are woven into a profound meditation on hubris, providence, nature,society, and the human struggle for meaning, happiness andsalvation. Moby-Dick is often considered the epitome of AmericanRomanticism. — Excerpted from Moby-Dick on Wikipedia, the freeonline encyclopedia. Illustrated by Anton Otto Fischer Look forother books on our site http://books.virenter.com.
Les Misérables, Volume I 5.11
Les Misérables Volume I ("Fantine") by Victor Hugo All volumes ofbook Volume I:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.virenter.books.aaabcVolume II:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.virenter.books.aaabdVolume III:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.virenter.books.aaabeVolume IV:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.virenter.books.aaabfVolume V:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.virenter.books.aaabgVirtual Entertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books One of themost well known novels of the 19th century follows the lives andinteractions of several French characters over a twenty year periodin the early 19th century that includes the Napoleonic wars andsubsequent decades. Principally focusing on the struggles of theprotagonist—ex-convict Jean Valjean—to redeem himself through goodworks, the novel examines the impact of Valjean's actions as socialcommentary. -— Excerpted from Les Misérables on Wikipedia, the freeencyclopedia. Translated from the original French by Isabel F.Hapgood Cover is the portrait of "Cosette" by Emile Bayard(1837-1891) Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Robinson Crusoe 7.3
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe Virtual Entertainment, 2012 Series:World adventure classic books Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com Epistolary, confessional, and didactic inform, the book is a fictional autobiography of the title character(whose birth name is Robinson Kreutznaer)—a castaway who spends 28years on a remote tropical island near Trinidad, encounteringcannibals, captives, and mutineers before being rescued. Despiteits simple narrative style, Robinson Crusoe was well received inthe literary world and is often credited as marking the beginningof realistic fiction as a literary genre. Before the end of 1719the book had already run through four editions, and it has gone onto become one of the most widely published books in history,spawning numerous sequels and adaptations for stage, film, andtelevision. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life 7.2.2
Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life by George EliotVirtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: The 10 Greatest Books of AllTime Middlemarch is a novel by George Eliot, the pen name of MaryAnne Evans, later Marian Evans. Subtitled "A Study of ProvincialLife," the novel is set in the fictitious Midlands town ofMiddlemarch during the period 1830–32. It has multiple plots with alarge cast of characters, and in addition to its distinct thoughinterlocking narratives it pursues a number of underlying themes,including the status of women, the nature of marriage, idealism andself-interest, religion and hypocrisy, political reform, andeducation. The pace is leisurely, the tone is mildly didactic (withan authorial voice that occasionally bursts through the narrative),and the canvas is very broad. — Excerpted from Wikipedia, the freeencyclopedia. Cover is the picture of "Dorothea Brooke and WillLadislaw" from issue published by The Jenson Society, NY, 1910 Lookfor other books on our site http://books.virenter.com/
The Three Musketeers 7.2.2
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, Virtual Entertainment,2015 Series: World adventure classic books This novel recounts theadventures of a young man named d'Artagnan after he leaves home totravel to Paris, to join the Musketeers of the Guard. D'Artagnan isnot one of the musketeers of the title; those being his friendsAthos, Porthos and Aramis, inseparable friends who live by themotto "all for one, one for all", a motto which is first put forthby d'Artagnan. -- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia translatedby William Robson Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Treasure Island 7.2.2
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: World adventure classic books Treasure Island isan adventure novel by Scottish author Robert LouisStevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold".Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, TreasureIsland is a tale known for its atmosphere, characters andaction, and also as a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality —as seen in Long John Silver — unusual for children'sliterature now and then. It is one of the most frequentlydramatized of all novels. The influence of TreasureIsland on popular perceptions of pirates isenormous, including treasure maps marked with an"X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands,and one-legged seamen carrying parrots on theirshoulders. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
Stories about Sherlock Holmes 7.2.2
The Stories about Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle VirtualEntertainment, 2013 Series: Detective classic books Illustrationsby Steele (1903) Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective createdby Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ALondon-based "consulting detective" whose abilities border on thefantastic, Holmes is famous for his astute logical reasoning, hisability to adopt almost any disguise, and his use of forensicscience skills to solve difficult cases. Holmes, who first appearedin publication in 1887, was featured in four novels and 56 shortstories. The first series of short stories beginning with A Scandalin Bohemia in 1891; further series of short stories published inserial form appeared between then and 1927. The stories cover aperiod from around 1880 up to 1914. Look for other books on oursite: http://books.virenter.com
Don Quixote 7.4
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote [The Ingenious GentlemanDon Quixote of La Mancha] Virtual Entertainment, 2015 Series: Worldclassic books translated by John Ormsby Don Quixote de la Mancha isa novel by the Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and isconsidered one of the best novels in history. The first part waspublished in 1605 and the second in 1615. It is one of the earliestwritten novels in a modern European language and is arguably themost influential and emblematic work in the canon of Spanishliterature. It follows the adventures of a nameless hidalgo (at theend of Part II given the name Alonso Quixano) who reads so manychivalric novels that he loses his sanity and decides to set out torevive chivalry, undo wrongs, and bring justice to the world, underthe name Don Quixote. He recruits a simple farmer, Sancho Panza, ashis squire, who often employs a unique, earthy wit in dealing withDon Quixote's rhetorical orations on antiquated knighthood. DonQuixote, in the first part of the book, does not see the world forwhat it is, and prefers to imagine that he is living out a knightlystory. -- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Look for otherbooks on our site http://books.virenter.com
Madame Bovary 7.2.2
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert Series: The 10 Greatest Books ofAll Timehttp://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1578073,00.html#ixzz2DitztA29Virtual Entertainment, 2013 The story focuses on a doctor's wife,Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her meansin order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life.Though the basic plot is rather simple, even archetypal, thenovel's true art lies in its details and hidden patterns. Flaubertwas a notorious perfectionist and claimed always to be searchingfor le mot juste ("the right word"). — Excerpted from Wikipedia,the free encyclopedia. Cover and App icon is a frame with IsabelleHuppert of movie "Madame Bovary" 1991, Director: Claude Chabrol.Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com/
The Gambler 7.2.2
The Gambler, by Fyodor Dostoevsky translated by C. J. Hogarth(1917) Virtual Entertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books TheGambler is a novel about a youngish tutor in the employment of aformerly wealthy Russian civil servant. — Excerpted from TheGambler on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other bookson our site http://books.virenter.com/
Baron Munchausen 7.2.2
Rudolph Erich Raspe THE SURPRISING ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSENVirtual Entertainment, 2015 Series: World adventure books BaronMunchausen is a fictional German nobleman in literature and film.The fictional Baron's exploits, narrated by himself, focus on hisimpossible achievements as a sportsman, soldier, and traveler, suchas riding on a cannonball and traveling to the Moon. Raspe's bookwas a major international success, and versions of the fictionalBaron have appeared on stage, screen, radio, and television. Thefictionalized character was created by a German-born writer,scientist, and con artist, Rudolf Erich Raspe. Raspe probably metHieronymus von Münchausen while studying at the University ofGöttingen,[5] and may even have been invited to dine with him atthe mansion at Bodenwerder. Raspe's later career mixed writing andscientific scholarship with theft and swindling; when the Germanpolice issued advertisements for his arrest in 1775, he fledcontinental Europe and settled in England.[14] In his native Germanlanguage, Raspe wrote a collection of anecdotes inspired byMünchhausen's tales, calling the collection "M-h-s-nscheGeschichten" ("M-h-s-n Stories"). It remains unclear how much ofRaspe's material comes directly from the Baron, but the majority ofthe stories are derived from older sources, including HeinrichBebel's Facetiæ (1508) and Samuel Gotthold Lange's DeliciæAcademicæ (1765). "M-h-s-nsche Geschichten" appeared as a featurein the eighth issue of the Vade mecum für lustige Leute (Handbookfor Fun-loving People), a Berlin humor magazine, in 1781. Raspepublished a sequel, "Noch zwei M-Lügen" ("Two more M-Fibs"), in thetenth issue of the same magazine in 1783. The hero and narrator ofthese stories was identified only as "M-h-s-n," keeping Raspe'sinspiration partly obscured while still allowing knowledgeableGerman readers to make the connection to Münchhausen. Raspe's namedid not appear at all. — From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
Emma by Jane Austen 5.1
Jane Austen, Emma Virtual Entertainment, 2015 Series: World classicbooks Twenty-four watercolor illustrations by Charles Edmund Emma,by Jane Austen, is a novel about youthful hubris and the perils ofmisconstrued romance. The novel was first published in December1815. As in her other novels, Austen explores the concerns anddifficulties of genteel women living in Georgian-Regency England;she also creates a lively comedy of manners among her characters.Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take aheroine whom no one but myself will much like." In the very firstsentence she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse,handsome, clever, and rich." Emma, however, is also rather spoiled,headstrong, and self-satisfied; she greatly overestimates her ownmatchmaking abilities; she is blind to the dangers of meddling inother people's lives; and her imagination and perceptions oftenlead her astray. -- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Look forother books on our site http://books.virenter.com
The Doom of the "Titanic" 1.0
A.VentoThe Doom of the "Titanic"Outline of the scenarioVirtualEntertainment, 2014Outline of the script of the film where the maincharacter is the legendary liner "Titanic". Unusual interpretationof the popular story with lots of illustrations.All requests sendto email: webvoru@gmail.com
The Pickwick Papers Ch.Dickens 7.2.2
The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (The Pickwick Papers) byCharles Dickens Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: World classicbooks Written for publication as a serial, The Pickwick Papers is asequence of loosely-related adventures. The action is given asoccurring 1827–8, though critics have noted some seeminganachronisms. The novel's main character, Samuel Pickwick, Esquire,is a kind and wealthy old gentleman, and the founder and perpetualpresident of the Pickwick Club. To extend his researches into thequaint and curious phenomena of life, he suggests that he and threeother "Pickwickians" (Mr Nathaniel Winkle, Mr Augustus Snodgrass,and Mr Tracy Tupman) should make journeys to remote places fromLondon and report on their findings to the other members of theclub. Their travels throughout the English countryside by coachprovide the chief theme of the novel. A distinctive and valuablefeature of the work is the generally accurate descriptions of theold coaching inns of England. Cover book is a illustration byRobert Seymour. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com
The Sweet Cheat Gone 7.2.2
In Search of Lost Time Volume Six: The Sweet Cheat Gone (TheFugitive) by Marcel Proust (Translator: C. K. Scott Moncrieff)Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series: The 10 Greatest Books of AllTime Note: this book was divided into additional parts due totechnical limitations Android-application. In Search of Lost Timeor Remembrance of Things Past (French: À la recherche du tempsperdu) is a novel in seven volumes. The novel had great influenceon twentieth-century literature; some writers have sought toemulate it, others to parody it. The novel began to take shape in1909. Proust continued to work on it until his final illness in theautumn of 1922 forced him to break off. Proust established thestructure early on, but even after volumes were initially finishedhe kept adding new material, and edited one volume after anotherfor publication. The last three of the seven volumes containoversights and fragmentary or unpolished passages as they existedin draft form at the death of the author; the publication of theseparts was overseen by his brother Robert. The work was published inFrance between 1913 and 1927. Proust paid for the publication ofthe first volume (by the Grasset publishing house) after it hadbeen turned down by leading editors who had been offered themanuscript in longhand. Many of its ideas, motifs and scenes appearin adumbrated form in Proust's unfinished novel, Jean Santeuil(1896–99), though the perspective and treatment there aredifferent, and in his unfinished hybrid of philosophical essay andstory, Contre Sainte-Beuve (1908–09). — Excerpted from Wikipedia,the free encyclopedia. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com/
Tess of the d'Urbervilles 7.2.2
Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles A Pure Woman VirtualEntertainment, 2016 Series: World classic books Dramatic life storyof a young woman born in a poor peasant family. After experiencingmany difficulties in life, it kills the hateful man and is tryingto find happiness. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com "...Poor wounded name! My bosom as a bedShall lodge thee." --William Shakespeare
A Night in a Moorish Harem 4.0
A Night in a Moorish Harem (1896), by AnonymousVirtualEntertainment, 2016Series: Spicy classic booksA Night in a MoorishHarem is an erotic novella anonymously written and narrated by themain character, "Lord George Herbert" in 1896. It recounts a nightspent by a shipwrecked British sailor in a Moroccan harem with nineconcubines of different nationalities. The harem topos is a typicalexample of the privileged location and also an example of Westernliterary orientalism.— Excerpted from A Night in a Moorish Harem,the free encyclopedia.Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com/
com.virenter.books.AOUHYFHOLHVFDNCA 7.2.2
The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series:Detective classic books This book generally considered the firstdetective novel in the English language. The Moonstone is a19th-century British epistolary novel. The Moonstone of the titleis a diamond. It gained its name from its association with theHindu god of the moon. Originally set in the forehead of a sacredstatue of the god at Somnath, and later at Benares, it was said tobe protected by hereditary guardians on the orders of Vishnu, andto wax and wane in brilliance along with the light of the moon.Look for other books on our site http://books.virenter.com
Within A Budding Grove 7.2.2
In Search of Lost Time Volume Two: Within A Budding Grove by MarcelProust (Translator: C. K. Scott Moncrieff) Virtual Entertainment,2013 Series: The 10 Greatest Books of All Time Note: this book wasdivided into additional parts due to technical limitationsAndroid-application. In Search of Lost Time or Remembrance ofThings Past (French: À la recherche du temps perdu) is a novel inseven volumes. The novel had great influence on twentieth-centuryliterature; some writers have sought to emulate it, others toparody it. The novel began to take shape in 1909. Proust continuedto work on it until his final illness in the autumn of 1922 forcedhim to break off. Proust established the structure early on, buteven after volumes were initially finished he kept adding newmaterial, and edited one volume after another for publication. Thelast three of the seven volumes contain oversights and fragmentaryor unpolished passages as they existed in draft form at the deathof the author; the publication of these parts was overseen by hisbrother Robert. The work was published in France between 1913 and1927. Proust paid for the publication of the first volume (by theGrasset publishing house) after it had been turned down by leadingeditors who had been offered the manuscript in longhand. Many ofits ideas, motifs and scenes appear in adumbrated form in Proust'sunfinished novel, Jean Santeuil (1896–99), though the perspectiveand treatment there are different, and in his unfinished hybrid ofphilosophical essay and story, Contre Sainte-Beuve (1908–09). —Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for otherbooks on our site http://books.virenter.com/
Go on! - I 1.3
Throw forward, but do not forget about the brakes!A simple butaddictive game for fun at home and in transport.The game task - tododge all the falling boxes that appear at random places in the skyand fall at different speeds.Scores are awarded when the car willpass under the box or have time to slow down before overflyingbox.Do not stand in one place, it does not save us from the fatalbox.Go on, just go!
Time Regained 7.2.2
In Search of Lost Time Volume Seven: Time Regained by Marcel Proust(Translated by Stephen Hudson) Virtual Entertainment, 2013 Series:The 10 Greatest Books of All Time Note: this book was divided intoadditional parts due to technical limitations Android-application.In Search of Lost Time or Remembrance of Things Past (French: À larecherche du temps perdu) is a novel in seven volumes. The novelhad great influence on twentieth-century literature; some writershave sought to emulate it, others to parody it. The novel began totake shape in 1909. Proust continued to work on it until his finalillness in the autumn of 1922 forced him to break off. Proustestablished the structure early on, but even after volumes wereinitially finished he kept adding new material, and edited onevolume after another for publication. The last three of the sevenvolumes contain oversights and fragmentary or unpolished passagesas they existed in draft form at the death of the author; thepublication of these parts was overseen by his brother Robert. Thework was published in France between 1913 and 1927. Proust paid forthe publication of the first volume (by the Grasset publishinghouse) after it had been turned down by leading editors who hadbeen offered the manuscript in longhand. Many of its ideas, motifsand scenes appear in adumbrated form in Proust's unfinished novel,Jean Santeuil (1896–99), though the perspective and treatment thereare different, and in his unfinished hybrid of philosophical essayand story, Contre Sainte-Beuve (1908–09). — Excerpted fromWikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Look for other books on our sitehttp://books.virenter.com/