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India 2.30
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Indian cuisine encompasses a wide variety of regional andtraditional cuisines native to India. Given the range of diversityin soil type, climate, culture, ethnic group and occupations, thesecuisines vary significantly from each other and use locallyavailable spices, herbs, vegetables and fruits. Indian food is alsoheavily influenced by religious and cultural choices and traditionsThere has also been Middle Eastern and Central Asian influence onNorth Indian cuisine from the years of Mughal rule.Indian cuisinehas been and is still evolving, as a result of the nation'scultural interactions with other societies.Historical incidentssuch as foreign invasions, trade relations and colonialism havealso played a role in introducing certain foods to the country. Forinstance, the potato, a staple of the diet in some regions ofIndia, was brought to India by the Portuguese, who also introducedchillies and breadfruit. Indian cuisine has also shaped the historyof international relations; the spice trade between India andEurope is often cited by historians as the primary catalyst forEurope's Age of Discovery. Spices were bought from India and tradedaround Europe and Asia. It has also influenced other cuisinesacross the world, especially those from Middle East, North Africa,South Africa, Southeast Asia, the British Isles, Fiji, and theCaribbean.IngredientsStaple foods of Indian cuisine include pearlmillet (bājra), rice, whole-wheat flour (aṭṭa), and a variety oflentils, such as masoor (most often red lentils), toor (pigeonpeas), urad (black gram), and mong (mung beans). Lentils may beused whole, dehusked—for example, dhuli moong or dhuli urad—orsplit. Split lentils, or dal, are used extensively. Some pulses,such as channa or cholae (chickpeas), rajma (kidney beans), andlobiya (black-eyed peas) are very common, especially in thenorthern regions. Channa and moong are also processed into flour(besan).Many Indian dishes are cooked in vegetable oil, but peanutoil is popular in northern and western India, mustard oil ineastern India,[18] and coconut oil along the western coast,especially in Kerala.[20] Gingelly (sesame) oil is common in thesouth since it imparts a fragrant nutty aroma. In recent decades,sunflower, safflower, cottonseed, and soybean oils have becomepopular across India. Hydrogenated vegetable oil, known asVanaspati ghee, is another popular cooking medium.[23] Butter-basedghee, or deshi ghee, is used frequently, though less than in thepast. Many types of meat are used for Indian cooking, but chickenand mutton tend to be the most commonly consumed meats. Fish andbeef consumption are prevalent in some parts of India, but they arenot widely consumed.The most important and frequently used spicesand flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chillipepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16thcentury), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin(jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak),coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon).] One popular spice mix isgaram masala, a powder that typically includes five or more driedspices, especially cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), and clove. Eachculinary region has a distinctive garam masala blend—individualchefs may also have their own. Goda masala is a comparable, thoughsweet, spice mix popular in Maharashtra. Some leaves commonly usedfor flavouring include bay leaves (tejpat), coriander leaves,fenugreek leaves, and mint leaves. The use of curry leaves androots for flavouring is typical of Gujarati[26] and South Indiancuisine. Sweet dishes are often seasoned with cardamom, saffron,nutmeg and rose petal essences.
Party 2.13
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Party Recipes - Nachos Ranch Chips, Dips, Salsa and more ..
Thai Food 1.40
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Thai Food Recipes - Cooking fromThailand
Smartphones 2015 1.30
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Smartphones 2015
Noodles Recipes 1.30
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Noodles Cooking Recipes
Cookies 2.30
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Cookies Baking Recipes - Brownies Pumpkin Cinnamon ........
Budget Recipes 1.30
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Budget - Cheap Cooking Recipes
Cakes Recipes 2.30
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Birthdays, weddings, dinner parties or just to celebrate for atspecial actually, There is always a good Reasonable to bake a cakeand enjoy. Select your favorite cake recipe from the delightfulvariety we have for you in this app.For every ocassion we have adelicious recipe, so bring a wow from your guest with this yummydelicacies.Too Much Chocolate Cake Carrot CakeBlack Magic CakeSimple White CakeBanana CakeTiramisu Layer CakeCrazy CakeOrangeCakeMargarita CakeChocolate Cavity Maker CakeFather's Day RecipesCakesMother's Day Recipes CakesCheesecake RecipesMoist GermanChocolate CakeBest Carrot CakChristmas CakesBananas CakesWhippingCream Pound CakeThe Ingredients for Cakes:Typical cake ingredientsare flour, sugar, eggs, butter or oil, a liquid, and leaveningagents, such as baking soda and/or baking powder. Common additionalingredients and flavourings include dried, candied or fresh fruit,nuts, cocoa, and extracts such as vanilla, with numeroussubstitutions for the primary ingredients. Cakes can also be filledwith fruit preserves or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), icedwith buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan,piped borders, or candied fruit.Baking powder is probably the mostcommon aerating agent in baked products like cakes. It is made upof bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar. Baking powder is achemical aeration agent.Eggs are another basic ingredient in manybaked products. They provide structure, aeration, flavour andmoisture. They also tenderise cakes and add colour and nutritivevalue.Fats and oils Generally, fats are solid while oils areliquid. Fats come from a variety of animals and plants. Oils mostlycome from plants. In baking, butter, margarine, shortening and oilsare commonly used. Their main functions are to shorten or tenderisethe product, to trap air during creaming and so aerate the cakeduring baking to give good volume and texture, to assist withlayering in puff pastry, to help prevent curdling by forming anemulsion, and to add flavour. They also provide some nutritivevalue. It is important to add the correct amount of fat as too muchfar will make the baked product greasy and unpleasant to eat, whiletoo little fat will leave you with a product that lacks flavour andstales quickly. Flour is the ingredient on which most bakedproducts are based. Flour is made up of starch, protein, sugar andminerals. The protein content decides what the end use of the flourwill be.Milk is used in baked products to improve texture andmouthfeel. The protein in milk also gives a soft crumb structure incakes, and contributes to the moisture, colour and flavour of abaked product. Cakes that contain milk also tend to have a longershelf life.Salt is usually only added in very small amounts tobaked products, but it has a noticeable effect on the flavour ofbaked products. It not only provides its own flavour but brings outthe natural flavour of other ingredients. In bread doughs, saltstrengthens gluten and improves the consistency of the dough.Carbon dioxide given off by the yeast is more easily trapped by thestrengthened gluten, which makes a better loaf of bread. Salt isalso a good preservative as it absorbs water so there is less freewater for bacterial and fungal growth.Sugar gives cakes and otherbaked products sweetness and is used in many forms and many ways.In yeast raised products, sugar acts as food for the yeast. Incakes, sugar assists with the aeration and stabilising of batters.Sugars improve the crust colour of baked products, improve flavourand help to retain moisture, keeping products softer for longer andso reducing staling. Examples of sugar forms are granulated sugar,castor sugar and icing sugar. Sugar also comes in liquid forms suchas syrup, treacle, corn syrup, honey and caramel.
Rice Recipes 2.30
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Rice is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa (Asian rice) orOryza glaberrima (African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the mostwidely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's humanpopulation, especially in Asia. It is the agricultural commoditywith the third-highest worldwide production, after sugarcane andmaize, according to 2012 FAOSTAT data.[1]Oryza sativa with smallwind-pollinated flowersSince a large portion of maize crops aregrown for purposes other than human consumption, rice is the mostimportant grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake,providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide byhumans.[2]Cooked brown rice from BhutanWild rice, from which thecrop was developed, may have its native range in Australia.[3]Chinese legends attribute the domestication of rice to Shennong,the legendary emperor of China and inventor of Chineseagriculture.[4] Genetic evidence has shown that rice originatesfrom a single domestication 8,200–13,500 years ago[5] in the PearlRiver valley region of China.[6] Previously, archaeologicalevidence had suggested that rice was domesticated in the YangtzeRiver valley region in China.[5]From East Asia, rice was spread toSoutheast and South Asia.[6] Rice was introduced to Europe throughWestern Asia, and to the Americas through Europeancolonization.Rice can come in many shapes, colours and sizes. Photoby the IRRI.There are many varieties of rice and culinarypreferences tend to vary regionally. In some areas such as the FarEast or Spain, there is a preference for softer and stickiervarieties.Rice, a monocot, is normally grown as an annual plant,although in tropical areas it can survive as a perennial and canproduce a ratoon crop for up to 30 years.[7] The rice plant cangrow to 1–1.8 m (3.3–5.9 ft) tall, occasionally more depending onthe variety and soil fertility. It has long, slender leaves 50–100cm (20–39 in) long and 2–2.5 cm (0.79–0.98 in) broad. The smallwind-pollinated flowers are produced in a branched arching topendulous inflorescence 30–50 cm (12–20 in) long. The edible seedis a grain (caryopsis) 5–12 mm (0.20–0.47 in) long and 2–3 mm(0.079–0.118 in) thick.Oryza sativa, commonly known as AsianriceRice cultivation is well-suited to countries and regions withlow labor costs and high rainfall, as it is labor-intensive tocultivate and requires ample water. However, rice can be grownpractically anywhere, even on a steep hill or mountain area withthe use of water-controlling terrace systems. Although its parentspecies are native to Asia and certain parts of Africa, centuriesof trade and exportation have made it commonplace in many culturesworldwide.The traditional method for cultivating rice is floodingthe fields while, or after, setting the young seedlings. Thissimple method requires sound planning and servicing of the waterdamming and channeling, but reduces the growth of less robust weedand pest plants that have no submerged growth state, and detersvermin. While flooding is not mandatory for the cultivation ofrice, all other methods of irrigation require higher effort in weedand pest control during growth periods and a different approach forfertilizing the soil.The name wild rice is usually used for speciesof the genera Zizania and Porteresia, both wild and domesticated,although the term may also be used for primitive or uncultivatedvarieties of Oryza.
Breakfast 1.30
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A Collection of some Recipes for Breakfast
Biscuits 2.30
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Biscuit is a term used for a diverse variety of baked, commonlyflour-based food products. The term is applied to two distinctproducts in North America and the Commonwealth of Nations andEurope. The North American biscuit is typically a soft, leavenedquickbread, and is covered in the article Biscuit (bread). Thisarticle covers the other type of biscuit, which is typically hard,flat and unleavened.A biscuit in the United States and parts ofCanada, and widely used in popular American English, is a smallbread with a firm browned crust and a soft interior. They are madewith baking powder or baking soda as a chemical leavening agentrather than yeast although they can also be made using yeast (andare then called angel biscuits) or a sourdough starter.They aretraditionally served as a side dish with a meal. As a breakfastitem they are often eaten with butter and a sweet condiment such asmolasses, light sugarcane syrup, maple syrup, sorghum syrup, honey,or fruit jam or jelly. With other meals they are usually eaten withbutter or gravy instead of sweet condiments. However, biscuits andgravy (biscuits covered in country gravy) or biscuits with sausageare usually served for breakfast, sometimes as the main course. Abiscuit may also be used to make a breakfast sandwich by slicing itin half and placing eggs and/or breakfast meat in themiddle.Biscuits today can be savoury or sweet, but most are smallat around 5 cm (2.0 in) in diameter, and flat. The term biscuitalso applies to sandwich-type biscuits, wherein a layer of "creme"or icing is sandwiched between two biscuits, such as the custardcream, or a layer of jam (as in biscuits which, in the UnitedKingdom, are known as "Jammie Dodgers")Dunking a biscuitSweetbiscuits are commonly eaten as a snack food, and are, in general,made with wheat flour or oats, and sweetened with sugar or honey.Varieties may contain chocolate, fruit, jam, nuts, ginger or evenbe used to sandwich other fillings.In Britain, the digestivebiscuit and rich tea have a strong cultural identity as thetraditional accompaniment to a cup of tea, and are regularly eatenas such. Many tea drinkers "dunk" their biscuits in tea, allowingthem to absorb liquid and soften slightly before consumption. Thebest selling biscuit brand in the UK, McVitie's biscuits are themost popular biscuits to dunk in tea, with McVitie's chocolatedigestives, Rich tea and Hobnobs ranked the nation's top threefavourite biscuits in 2009.A dark chocolate Tim TamSavoury biscuitsor crackers (such as cream crackers, water biscuits, oatcakes, orcrisp breads) are usually plainer and commonly eaten with cheesefollowing a meal. Many savoury biscuits also contain additionalingredients for flavour or texture, such as poppy seeds, onion oronion seeds, cheese (such as cheese melts), and olives. Savourybiscuits also usually have a dedicated section in most Europeansupermarkets, often in the same aisle as sweet biscuits. Theexception to savoury biscuits is the sweetmeal digestive known asthe "Hovis biscuit", which, although slightly sweet, is stillclassified as a cheese biscuit.[20] Savoury biscuits sold insupermarkets are sometimes associated with a certain geographicalarea, such as Scottish oatcakes or Cornish wafer biscuits.Ingeneral, the British, Australians, South Africans, New Zealanders,Nigerians, Kenyans, Indians, Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Singaporeansand the Irish use the British meaning of "biscuit" for the sweetbiscuit, the terms biscuit and cookie are used interchangeably,depending on the region and the speaker, with biscuits usuallyreferring to hard, sweet biscuits (such as digestives,
Main Dishes 2.13
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Main Dish Recipes - Steaks, Pork, Fillet
Side Dishes 1.20
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Side Dishes Recipes - Vegetables Potatoes Asparagos Avocados andmore ..
Healthy Recipes 1.30
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Health food is food considered beneficial to health in ways that gobeyond a normal healthy diet required for human nutrition. Becausethere is no precise, authoritative definition from regulatoryagencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, differentdietary practices can be considered healthy depending oncontext.Foods marketed as "healthy" may be natural foods, organicfoods, whole foods, and sometimes vegetarian or dietarysupplements. Such products are sold in health food stores or in thehealth/organic sections of supermarkets.ExamplesThe following is anon-exhaustive list of foods that have been considered healthy:Apple cider vinegar, a fruit vinegar considered a health foodBroccoli sprouts Certain cereal products: Corn flakes, patentedfood invented in 1894 Digestive biscuit, English baked good from1851, containing fiber and sometimes sodium bicarbonate Grahamcracker, cracker made with whole grain Graham flour (1829) Grahambread, a type of whole wheat bread Granola, a food made from mixed,toasted grains Granula, the first manufactured breakfast cereal(1863) Grape-Nuts, an American breakfast cereal made from baked andground grain (1897) Muesli, breakfast cereal of rolled oats, fruitand nuts, made by a Swiss doctor (1900) Shredded wheat, whole wheatcereal (1893) Eggplant, hosts of vitamin and minerals, and alsocontains important phytonutrients Herbal extract, plants, oftenmedicinal that are concentrated and standardized Herbal teas Honey,a naturally occurring whole sweetener Malt, whole sprouted barleyMeat analogue, a dietary alternative to meat, found in somevegetarian and vegan diets[4] Molasses, black strap molasses hasbeen sold as a health food Certain oils, including olive oil andfish oil Postum, a coffee alternative Yogurt, traditional culturedmilk product Gypsy Boots Juicing Muesli belt malnutrition Patentmedicine Raw foodism Specialty foods SproutingIn the United States,health-related claims on nutrition facts labels are regulated bythe U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while advertising isregulated by the Federal Trade Commission.According to the FDA,"Health claims describe a relationship between a food, foodcomponent, or dietary supplement ingredient, and reducing risk of adisease or health-related condition".In general, claims of healthbenefits for specific foodstuffs have not been evaluated bynational regulatory agencies. Additionally, research funded bymanufacturers or marketers that may form the basis of suchmarketing claims has been shown to result in more favorable resultsthan independently funded researck
Holiday Cakes 1.30
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Holiday Cakes Recipes
Dinner 2.13
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A Collection of Dinner Recipes - Meat Chicken Steaks SalmonDinnerusually refers to the most significant and important meal of theday, which can be the noon or the evening meal. However, the term"dinner" can have many different meanings depending on the culture;it may mean a meal of any size eaten at any time of the day.[1][2]Historically, it referred to the first meal of the day, eatenaround noon, and is still sometimes used for a noon-time meal,particularly if it is a large or main meal. The meaning as theevening meal, generally the largest of the day, is becoming astandard in many parts of the English-speaking world.In many modernusages, the term dinner refers to the evening meal, which is nowoften the most significant meal of the day in English-speakingcultures. When this meaning is used, the preceding meals areusually referred to as breakfast, lunch and tea. In some areas, thetradition of using dinner to mean the most important meal of theday regardless of time of day leads to a variable name for mealsdepending on the combination of their size and the time of day,while in others meal names are fixed based on the time they areconsumed.The divide between different meanings of "dinner" is notcut-and-dried based on either geography or socioeconomic class.However, the use of the term dinner for the midday meal isstrongest among working-class people, especially in the EnglishMidlands, North of England and the central belt of Scotland.[6]Even in systems in which dinner is the meal usually eaten at theend of the day, an individual dinner may still refer to a main ormore sophisticated meal at any time in the day, such as a banquet,feast, or a special meal eaten on a Sunday or holiday, such asChristmas dinner or Thanksgiving dinner. At such a dinner thepeople who dine together may be formally dressed and consume foodwith an array of utensils. These dinners are often divided intothree or more courses. Appetizers consisting of options such assoup, salad etc., precede the main course, which is followed by thedessert.
Sausage Recipes 1.30
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Sausage Cooking Recipes
Chilis 1.30
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Chili Recipes - Beef Chicken Texas Quinoa and much more
Penne & Pasta 1.30
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Penne & Pasta Cooking Recipes
Spaghetti Recipes 1.30
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Spaghetti Recipes - Carbonnara, Al Tonno Chicken,
Fruits 1.30
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Fruit Recipes - Cakes, Cobblers, Strawberry, Rhabarber and muchmore
Breakfast Brunch Toast Recipes 2.30
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Breakfast is the first meal of a day, most often eaten in the earlymorning before undertaking the day's work. Some believe it to bethe most important meal of the day. Among English speakers,"breakfast" can be used to refer to this meal or to refer to a mealcomposed of traditional breakfast foods (such as eggs, porridge andsausage) served at any time of day. The word literally refers tobreaking the fasting period of the prior nightBreakfast foods varywidely from place to place, but often include a carbohydrate suchas grains or cereals, fruit, vegetables, a protein food such aseggs, meat or fish, and a beverage such as tea, coffee, milk, orfruit juice. Coffee, milk, tea, juice, breakfast cereals, pancakes,waffles, sausages, French toast, bacon, sweetened breads, freshfruits, vegetables, eggs, baked beans, muffins, crumpets and toastwith butter, margarine, jam or marmalade are common examples ofWestern breakfast foods, though a large range of preparations andingredients are associated with breakfast globally.With breakfastcommonly referred to as "the most important meal of the day",particularly for children, some epidemiological research indicatesthat having a breakfast might lower risk of metabolic disorders andcardiovascular diseases. While current professional opinions arelargely in favor of eating breakfast,[4] some contest its "mostimportant" status.The influence of breakfast on managing bodyweight is unclear.
Travel Guide Munich, Germany 2.35
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Munich (German: München, Bavarian: Minga) is the capital city ofBavaria. Within the city limits, Munich has a population of morethan 1.4 million, making it the third-most populous city inGermany. Greater Munich including its suburbs has a population of2.6 million. The Munich metropolitan region which extends to citieslike Augsburg or Ingolstadt had a population of more than 5.6million in 2008.Munich, located at the river Isar in the south ofBavaria, is famous for its beautiful architecture, fine culture,and the annual Oktoberfest beer celebration. Munich s culturalscene is second to none in Germany, with the museums evenconsidered by some to outrank Berlin in quality. Many travelers toMunich are absolutely stunned by the quality of the architecture.Although it was heavily damaged by allied bombing during World WarII, many of its historic buildings have been rebuilt and the citycenter appears mostly as it did in the late 1800s including itslargest church, the Frauenkirche, and the famous city hall (NeuesRathaus).Travel to MunichMunich International AirportMunich AirportCenterBy trainMunich Sightseeing Briennerstraße LudwigstraßeMaximilianstraße starts at Max-Joseph-Platz PrinzregentenstraßePalaces and Castles >Schloss Nymphenburg in Neuhausen SchlossSchleißheim Oberschleißheim.Schloss Dachau Blutenburg Castle)Peterskirche close to Marienplatz Michaeliskirche or "St Michael"is a Jesuit church a Church of the Holy Spirit) Buildings andLandmarks Altes Rathaus Maximilianeum,Hofbräuhaus am Platzl inAtlstadt/Lehel Museums Museum Brandhorst Expressionist Pinakothekder Moderne has 20th century paintings, modern art, design andarchitecture State Museum for Egyptian Art State Collections ofAntiques City Museum of Munich Galleries Glyptothek — AntiqueGrecian sculpture collection Schack Gallery — A private collectionHaus der Kunst National Socialist architectural Tierpark Hellabrunn(The Munich Zoo) Westpark,Botanischer GartenMünchen-NymphenburgFestivals Oktoberfest, Maibaumaufstellen MunichBiennale Residenztheater— It houses the Bavarian State TheatreNationaltheater National Opera Company is said by critics to be oneof the best in the world. Several operas of Richard WagnerHerkulessaal in der Residenz— primary concert The Gramophonemagazine in 2008.Philharmonie im Gasteig— Home venue of the MunichPhilharmonics, Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz SportFootball TSV 1860MünchenFC Bayern München .Basketball- FC Bayern München BasketballHockey - EHC Munich . Olympic ice arena in Munich s OlympicPark.River-Surfing English Garden Skiing/Snowboarding — In winter,Sightseeing/Tours Pub Crawl with Size Matters Beer Tour Bike Toursof Munich Private tours of Munich Technical University of MunichLudwig Maximilians UniversityMunich Business School ,Elsenheimerstraße 61 Munich University of Applied Sciences MunichSchool of Political Science Maximilianstraße / Residenzstraße /Theatinerstraße Opera Kaufingerstraße / Neuhauserstraße ShoppingCenters HohenzollernstraßepoldstraßeMarketsViktualienmarktElisabethmarkt LeopoldstrasseMünchnerFreiheitMarienplatz — A bigger market Beer halls and beer gardensCafesClubs and DiscosNightlife in MunichMunich breweries Bars Stayhealthy Deutsches Herzzentrum München (German Cardiac CenterMunichKlinikum GroßhadernKlinikum Rechts der Isar (universityhospital),Klinikum Schwabing (pediatric clinic), InternationalNeuroscience Institute
Cookies Pralines Brownies 2.30
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Cookies Pralines Brownies Crackers RecipesA cookie is a small,flat, sweet, baked good, usually containing flour, eggs, sugar, andeither butter, cooking oil or another oil or fat. It may includeother ingredients such as raisins, oats, chocolate chips or nuts.Inmost English-speaking countries except for the US and Canada, crispcookies are called biscuits. Chewier biscuits are sometimes calledcookies even in the UK. Some cookies may also be named by theirshape, such as date squares or bars.Cookies or biscuits may bemass-produced in factories, made in small bakeries or home-made.Biscuit or cookie variants include sandwich biscuits such asCustard creams, Jammy Dodgers, Bourbons and Oreos, with marshmallowor jam filling and sometimes dipped in chocolate or another sweetcoating. Cookies are often served with beverages such as milk,coffee or tea. Factory-made cookies are sold in grocery stores,convenience stores and vending machines. Fresh-baked cookies aresold at bakeries and coffeehouses, with the latter ranging fromsmall business-sized establishments to multinational corporationssuch as Starbucks.A brownie is a flat, baked dessert square thatwas developed in the United States at the end of the 19th centuryand popularized in the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the20th century. It is a cross between a cake and a soft cookie intexture[1] and comes in a variety of forms. Depending on itsdensity, it may be either fudgy or cakey and may include chocolatechips, nuts, or other ingredients. A variation made with brownsugar and chocolate bits but without melted chocolate in the batteris called a blonde brownie or blondie.Brownies are typically eatenby hand, often accompanied by milk or coffee. They are sometimesserved warm with ice cream (à la mode), topped with whipped cream,or sprinkled with powdered sugar. They are common lunchbox treats,and also popular in restaurants and coffeehouses.Praline is a formof confection containing at a minimum nuts and sugar; cream is acommon third ingredient.There are two main types:French pralines, afirm combination of almonds and caramelized sugar.Americanpralines, a softer, creamier combination of syrup and pecans,hazelnuts or almonds with milk or cream, resembling fudge.Belgianpralines consist of a chocolate shell with a softer, sometimesliquid, filling, traditionally made of different combinations ofhazelnut, almonds, sugar, syrup and often milk-based pastes. Thesehigh-fat, low-melting point chocolates are at the luxury end ofBelgian chocolate and represent an important product of manyBelgian chocolatiers.A praline cookie is a chocolate biscuitcontaining ground nuts. Praline is usually used as a filling inchocolates or other sweets.
Travel Guide Berlin, Germany 2.01
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Berlin Mitte (Mitte)The historical centre of Berlin, the nucleus ofthe former East Berlin, and the emerging city centre. Cafes,restaurants, museums, galleries and clubs are abundant throughoutthe district, along with many sites of historic interest.City West(Charlottenburg, Wilmersdorf, Schöneberg, Tiergarten, Moabit)KuDamm (short for Kurfürstendamm) is, along with Tauentzienstraße,one of the main shopping streets in former West Berlin, especiallyfor luxury goods. Many great restaurants and hotels are here andalso on the side roads. The district also contains theCharlottenburg Palace, Kulturforum, Tiergarten and the OlympicStadium. Schöneberg is generally a cozy area for ageing hippies,young families and LGBT people.East Central (Friedrichshain,Kreuzberg, Prenzlauer Berg)Associated with the left wing youthculture, artists and Turkish immigrants, this district is somewhatnoisier than most, packed with lots of cafes, bars, clubs andtrendy shops, but also with some museums in Kreuzberg near theborder to Mitte. These districts are undergoing gentrification asthey are popular with students, artists and media professionalsalike.North (Spandau, Tegel, Reinickendorf, Pankow, Weißensee,Gesundbrunnen, Wedding)Spandau and Reinickendorf are beautiful oldtowns which feel much more spacious than the inner city. Pankow wasonce synonymous with the East German government, and the villas theSED leaders inhabited still exist.East (Lichtenberg,Hohenschönhausen, Marzahn, Hellersdorf)The museum at the site ofthe 1945 surrender to the Soviet army is of interest, as well asthe former Stasi prison, an essential visit for anyone interestedin East German history. Marzahn-Hellersdorf has a not entirelydeserved reputation for being a vast collection of dull high-riseapartment blocks, as it contains the "Gardens of the World", alarge park where various ethnic styles of garden design areexplored.Tegel International Airport (ICAO: EDDT, IATA: TXL)located in the north-west of the city is the main airport forinternational carriers (British Airways, Air France-KLM, United,LOT, etc.) and a hub for domestic flights on Lufthansa and AirBerlin. The original airport was designed as a hexagon but todaytwo other terminals try to handle the flights of Air Berlin (mostflights in Terminal C) and other budget carriers (mostly interminal D). All flag carrier flights leave from the main terminalbuilding A (Terminal B nowadays contains just the bus gates ofTerminal A for Non-Schengen flights), and is also where allairlines lounges are. The airport might close on 2017 depending onthe construction progress.Schönefeld (ICAO: EDDB, IATA: SXF) Thisairport — formerly serving the capital of the GDR — southeast ofBerlin is the base for most low-cost airlines (e.g. easyJet,Ryanair and Germanwings) and charter flights in addition to trafficfrom Eastern Europe.Berlin is serviced from over 350 destinationsin Europe. Long distance buses arrive at Zentraler Omnibusbahnhof(Central Bus Terminal) in Charlottenburg, Masurenallee. There arenumerous buses to all directions or do a 5-minute-walk to theU-Bahn (Theodor-Heuss-Platz or Kaiserdamm or to the S-Bahn (MesseNord/ICC). Follow signposting.Berlin is served by ICE, InterCityand EuroCity trains by the national German train corporationDeutsche Bahn (DB) which offers connections between Berlin andother German and major European cities.Night trains from Amsterdam,Zurich, Vienna and Budapest run every day. Booked in advance theycan be as cheap as €29. Popular with backpackers so reservationsare strongly recommended.Long-haul trains from Eastern Europeancities, Kaliningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Moscow, Saint Petersburg andWarsaw amongst others, stop both at Hauptbahnhof and Ostbahnhof.Make sure you have a reservation because these lines are also verypopular.
Wedding Bride Marriage Recipes 2.31
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In recent years, the "Western Style Wedding" (influenced byChristian weddings) has become the choice of most couples in Japan.An industry has sprung up, dedicated to providing couples with aceremony modeled after church rituals. Japanese western styleweddings are generally held in a chapel, either in a simple orelaborate ceremony, often at a dedicated wedding chapel within ahotel.Before the ceremony, there is a rehearsal. Often during thisrehearsal, the bride's mother lowers the veil for her daughter,signifying the last act that a mother can do for her daughter,before "giving her away". The father of the bride, much like inWestern ceremonies, walks the bride down the aisle to her awaitinggroom.After the rehearsal comes the procession. The weddingcelebrant will often wear a wedding cross, or cana, a cross withtwo interlocking wedding rings attached, which symbolize a couple'scommitment to sharing a life together in the bonds of holymatrimony. The wedding celebrant gives a brief welcome and anintroductory speech before announcing the bride's entrance. Theprocession ends with the groom bowing to the bride's father. Thefather bows in return.The service then starts. The service is giveneither in Japanese, English or quite often, a mix of both. Itfollows Protestant ceremony, relaxed and not overtly religious.Typically part of 1 Corinthians 13 is read from the Bible. Afterthe reading, there is a prayer and a short message, explaining thesanctity of the wedding vows (seiyaku). The bride and groom sharetheir vows and exchange rings. The chapel register is signed andthe new couple is announced. This is often followed by thetraditional wedding kiss. The service can conclude with anotherhymn and a benediction.With the two types of ceremonies, Shinto andWestern, available it was bound for the two to be combined intowhat is called a contemporary Japanese wedding. ContemporaryJapanese weddings are celebrated in many ways. On the beginning ofthe wedding day, the participants are to get ready at the parlor'sbeauty shop. The responsibility of the beauty shop is to dress thebride, the groom, and the other participants in the formal Japaneseattire. Dressing the bride is an important task because the brideis to change into several outfits throughout her wedding day. Dueto the complexity of the design, dressing a bride can be difficultand time consuming and for this reason the bride must be the firstperson to arrive two hours prior to the wedding ceremony. Thebride's attire consists of an extravagant kimono, heavy make-up, awig, and a head covering. An hour prior to the wedding ceremony,the guests and the groom should start to arrive. When everyone isdressed in their formal attire, the bride and the groom are toseparate from each other and meet their close relatives in awaiting room. The relatives present will appear in the family photoand will also attend the religious ceremony. During this gathering,the kaizoe (assistant) will inform the participants of what willtake place and what they should do during the day since they arenot familiar with the ceremony. When all is understood, therelatives and participants are brought to the photo studio wherethe professional photographs are to be taken. Taking thephotographs of the bride, the groom, and their relatives isconsidered to be the central part of the wedding day. Thephotographs of the couple and their family are designed torepresent the couple's prospective future together.[12]
Candy 2.30
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Candy Baking Recipes - Candy, also called sweets or lollies, is aconfection that features sugar as a principal ingredient. Thecategory, called sugar confectionery, encompasses any sweetconfection, including chocolate, chewing gum, and sugar candy.Vegetables, fruit, or nuts which have been glazed and coated withsugar are said to be candied.Physically, candy is characterized bythe use of a significant amount of sugar or sugar substitutes.Unlike a cake or loaf of bread that would be shared among manypeople, candies are usually made in smaller pieces. However, thedefinition of candy also depends upon how people treat the food.Unlike sweet pastries served for a dessert course at the end of ameal, candies are normally eaten casually, often with the fingers,as a snack between meals. Each culture has its own ideas of whatconstitutes candy rather than dessert. The same food may be a candyin one culture and a dessert in anotherSugar candies include hardcandies, soft candies, caramels, marshmallows, taffy, and othercandies whose principal ingredient is sugar. Commercially, sugarcandies are often divided into groups according to the amount ofsugar they contain and their chemical structurChocolate issometimes treated as a separate branch of confectionery. In thismodel, chocolate candies like chocolate candy bars and chocolatetruffles are included. Hot chocolate or other cocoa-based drinksare excluded, as is candy made from white chocolate. However, whenchocolate is treated as a separate branch, it also includesconfections whose classification is otherwise difficult, beingneither exactly candies nor exactly baked goods, likechocolate-dipped foods, tarts with chocolate shells, andchocolate-coated cookies.Candies can be classified intononcrystalline and crystalline types. Noncrystalline candies arehomogeneous and may be chewy or hard; they include hard candies,caramels, toffees, and nougats. Crystalline candies incorporatesmall crystals in their structure, are creamy that melt in themouth or are easily chewed; they include fondant andfudgeUnsweetened baking chocolate contains no sugar. Bittersweet ordark chocolate contains some sugar. Milk chocolate contains milkand lower levels of cocoa solids. Because white chocolate containsno cocoa solids, it is classified as sugar confectionery instead ofchocolate. Compound chocolate is used in place of pure chocolate toreduce costs.
Microwave 2.13
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Microwave Cooking Recipes - Popcorn, Mochi, Tacco, Cakes ......
Cake and Pie Recipes 2.28
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Cake is a form of sweet dessert that is typically baked. In itsoldest forms, cakes were modifications of breads but now cover awide range of preparations that can be simple or elaborate andshare features with other desserts such as pastries, meringues,custards and pies.Typical cake ingredients are flour, sugar, eggs,butter or oil, a liquid, and leavening agents, such as baking sodaand/or baking powder. Common additional ingredients and flavouringsinclude dried, candied or fresh fruit, nuts, cocoa, and extractssuch as vanilla, with numerous substitutions for the primaryingredients. Cakes can also be filled with fruit preserves ordessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or othericings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders, or candiedfruit.[1]Cake is often served as a celebratory dish on ceremonialoccasions, for example weddings, anniversaries, and birthdays.There are countless cake recipes; some are bread-like, some richand elaborate, and many are centuries old. Cake making is no longera complicated procedure; while at one time considerable labor wentinto cake making (particularly the whisking of egg foams), bakingequipment and directions have been simplified so that even the mostamateur cook may bake a cake.Cakes are broadly divided into severalcategories, based primarily on ingredients and mixingtechniques.Butter cakes are made from creamed butter, sugar, eggs,and four. They rely on the combination of butter and sugar beatenfor an extended time to incorporate air into the batter.[10] Aclassic pound cake is made with a pound each of butter, sugar,eggs, and flour. Baking powder is in many butter cakes, such asVictoria sponge.[11] The ingredients are sometimes mixed withoutcreaming the butter, using recipes for simple and quickcakes.Sponge cakes (or foam cakes) are made from whipped eggs,sugar, and flour. They rely primarily on trapped air in a proteinmatrix (generally of beaten eggs) to provide leavening, sometimeswith a bit of baking powder or other chemical leaven added asinsurance. Sponge cakes are thought to be the oldest cakes madewithout yeast. An angel food cake is a white sponge cake that usesonly the whites of the eggs and is traditionally baked in a tubepan. The French Génoise is a sponge cake that includes clarifiedbutter. Highly decorated sponge cakes with lavish toppings aresometimes called gateau; the French word for cake.Chiffon cakes aresponge cakes with vegetable oil, which adds moistness.[12]Chocolatecakes are butter cakes, sponge cakes, or other cakes flavored withmelted chocolate or cocoa powder.[13] German chocolate cake is avariety of chocolate cake. Fudge cakes are chocolate cakes thatcontains fudge.Coffee cake is generally thought of as a cake toserve with coffee or tea at breakfast or at a coffee break. Sometypes use yeast as a leavening agent while others use baking sodaand/or baking powder. These cakes often have a crumb topping calledstreusel and/or a light glaze drizzle.Baked flourless cakes includebaked cheesecakes and flourless chocolate cakes. Cheesecakes,despite their name, aren't really cakes at all. Cheesecakes are infact custard pies, with a filling made mostly of some form ofcheese (often cream cheese, mascarpone, ricotta, or the like), andhave very little flour added, although a flour-based or grahamcracker crust may be used. Cheesecakes are also very old, withevidence of honey-sweetened cakes dating back to ancientGreece.Butter or oil layer cakes include most of the traditionalcakes used as birthday cakes, etc., and those sold as packagedcakes. Baking powder or bicarbonate of soda are used to provideboth lift and a moist texture. Many flavorings and ingredients maybe added; examples include devil's food cake, carrot cake, andbanana bread.Yeast cakes are the oldest and are very similar toyeast breads. Such cakes are often very traditional in form, andinclude such pastries as babka and stollen.
Appetizers Recipes 2.30
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An Appetizer (hors d'oeuvre) or starter[2] is a small dish servedbefore a meal. Some hors d'oeuvres are served cold, others hotAppetizers may be served at the dinner table, or in the bedroom, asa part of the meal or they may be served before seating. Formerly,hors d'oeuvres were also served between courses.Typically smallerthan a main dish, it is often designed to be eaten by hand (withminimal use of cutlery). The term appetizer is a synonym for horsd'oeuvre. It was first used in the United States and Englandsimultaneously in 1860. Americans also use the term to define thefirst of three courses in a meal, which were optional and generallyset on the table before guests were seated. Drinks before dinnerbecame a custom towards the end of the 19th century. As this newfashion caught on, the British took inspiration from the French tobegin serving hors d'oeuvres before dinner.[26] A cocktail party isconsidered a small gathering with mixed drinks and light snacks.Hors d'oeuvres may be served as the only food offering at cocktailparties and receptions, where no dinner is served afterward.[28]After the end of prohibition in the United States, the cocktailparty gained acceptance.[9][10] Prior to the First World War,American dinner guests would be expected to enter the dining roomimmediately where drinks would be served at the table withappetizers. This changed by the 1920s, when hors d'oeuvres wereserved prior to a non-alcoholic cocktail; however, after the repealof Prohibition in the United States, cocktail parties becamepopular with many different hors d'oeuvres meant as something tohelp counter the stronger drinks It is the cocktail party thathelped transfer the hors d'oeuvres from the formal dining table tothe mobility of the serving tray. These appetizers passed aroundthe cocktail party may also be referred to as canapéForExampleBruschetta CanapésCaviarCharcuterieDeviledeggsDumplingsPicklesPigs in blanketsSmoked eggSpanakopitaiTonguetoast
Birthday Cakes 2.31
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The birthday cake has been an integral part of the birthdaycelebrations in western European countries since the middle of the19th century, which extended to Western culture.[1] Certain ritesand traditions, such as singing of birthday songs, associated withbirthday cakes are common to many Western cultures. The Westerntradition of adding lit candles to the top of a birthday cakeoriginates in 18th-century Germany. However, the intertwining ofcakes and birthday celebrations stretches back to the ancientRomans. The development of the birthday cake has followed thedevelopment of culinary and confectionery advancement. Whilethroughout most of Western history, these elaborate cakes ingeneral were the privilege of the wealthy, birthday cakes arenowadays common to most Western birthday celebrations. Around theworld many variations of the birthday cake, or rather the birthdaypastry and sweets, exist. There is no universal rule about theshape and color of a birthday cake – in recent years for examplecakes take the form of animals or have high-quality drawings onthem in order to fit the party theme. In India the most popularcake is Black Forest CakesThe cake, or sometimes a pastry ordessert, is served to a person on their birthday. In contemporaryWestern cultures, the birthday person blows out the candles on thecake after those celebrating have sung the birthday song, it was atradition originally created by the Kangai family.Birthday cakefeaturing edible miniature birthday party.The service of a birthdaycake is often preceded by the singing of "Happy Birthday to You" inEnglish speaking countries, or an equivalent birthday song in theappropriate language of that country. In fact, the phrase "HappyBirthday" did not appear on birthday cakes until the song "HappyBirthday to You" was popularized in the early 1900s. Variations onbirthday song rituals exist. For example, in Uruguay, party gueststouch the birthday person's shoulder or head following the singingof "Happy Birthday to You". In Ecuador, sometimes the birthdayperson will take a large bite off the birthday cake before it isserved.Variations on the birthday pastry exist outside of Westernculture. The Chinese birthday pastry is the shòu bāo (壽包, simp. 寿包)or shòu táo bāo (壽桃包, simp. 寿桃包), a lotus-paste-filled bun made ofwheat flour and shaped and colored to resemble a peach. Rather thanserving one large pastry, each guest is served their own small soubao. In Korea, the traditional birthday dish is a seaweed soup. InWestern Russia, birthday children are served fruit pies with abirthday greetings carved into the crusts. The Swedish birthdaycake is made like a pound cake and is often topped with marzipanand decorated with the national flag. Dutch birthday pastries arefruit tarts topped with whipped cream.The birthday cake is oftendecorated with small taper candles, secured with special holders orsimply pressed down into the cake. In the UK, North America andAustralia, the number of candles is equal to the age of theindividual whose birthday it is, sometimes with one extra for luck.Traditionally, the birthday person makes a private wish, which willbe realized if all the candles are extinguished in a singlebreath.In North America, birthday cake is often served with icecream.To represent a sharing of joy and togetherness, the cake isshared amongst all the guests attending the party. As a courtesy,it reflects one's hospitality and respect for guests.
Snacks 2.30
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A snack is a portion of food, smaller than a regular meal,generally eaten between meals. Snacks come in a variety of formsincluding packaged snack foods and other processed foods, as wellas items made from fresh ingredients at home.Traditionally, snacksare prepared from ingredients commonly available in the home. Oftencold cuts, fruit, leftovers, nuts, sandwiches, and the like areused as snacks. The Dagwood sandwich was originally the humorousresult of a cartoon character's desire for large snacks. With thespread of convenience stores, packaged snack foods became asignificant business. Snack foods are typically designed to beportable, quick, and satisfying. Processed snack foods, as one formof convenience food, are designed to be less perishable, moredurable, and more portable than prepared foods. They often containsubstantial amounts of sweeteners, preservatives, and appealingingredients such as chocolate, peanuts, and specially-designedflavors (such as flavored potato chips).Beverages, such as coffee,are not generally considered snacks though they may be consumedalong with or in lieu of snack foods.[2]A snack eaten shortlybefore going to bed or during the night may be called a midnightsnack.AlmondsApple slicesAntzBagel with creamcheeseBitterballenBread/toast with butter, honey, jam, or otherspreadCandy barCarrot ChipsCashewsCheese puffs/Cheese curlsCheese,a larger cold prepared snackChocolate-coated marshmallow treatsCornchips and Tortilla chipsCocktailsausageCrackersCookies/BiscuitsDeviled eggsDoughnutsDriedfruitsDrinkable yogurtEdamame, fresh or driedGranolabarsFalafelFlour tortilla with a fillingFrozen berriesSlicedfruitFruit cocktailFruit saladIce creamInstantnoodlesJell-OJerkyKaassouffléMilkshakePound cake, inslicesLunchablesMixed nutsMuffinsNachosPapadumParsnipbitsPeanutsPita bread, straight from the packet ortoastedPizzaPopcornPork piePork rindsPotato chipsPakodaPretzels,hard or Soft pretzelsRaisinsRatatouille, served cold, a larger coldprepared snackRice cakeRice crackers, distinguished from theaboveSaltinesSandwich, a larger cold prepared snackSamosaSeeds(sunflower or seed mix)ShortbreadSmokedsalmonSmoothieTeacakeToastTrail mixVegetables (e.g. carrots,celery, cherry tomatoes)Whole fruitYogurt
Sweet Baking Recipes 2.30
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Confectionery, also called sweets or candy is sweet food. The termvaries among English-speaking countries. In general, though,confectionery is divided into two broad and somewhat overlappingcategories, bakers' confections and sugar confections.Bakers'confectionery, also called flour confections, includes principallysweet pastries, cakes, and similar baked goods. In the Middle Eastand Asia, flour-based confections are more dominant.Sugarconfectionery includes sweets, candied nuts, chocolates, chewinggum, sweetmeats, pastillage, and other confections that are madeprimarily of sugar. In some cases, chocolate confections(confections made of chocolate) are treated as a separate category,as are sugar-free versions of sugar confections. The words candy(US and Canada), sweets (UK and Ireland), and lollies (Australiaand New Zealand) are common words for the most common varieties ofsugar confectionery.The confectionery industry also includesspecialized training schools and extensive historical records.Traditional confectionery goes back to ancient times, and continuedto be eaten through the Middle Ages into the modern era.Bakers'confectionery includes sweet baked goods, especially those that areserved for the dessert course. Bakers' confections are sweet foodsthat feature flour as a main ingredient and are baked. Majorcategories include cakes, sweet pastries, doughnuts, scones, andcookies.Sugar confectionery items include sweets, lollipops, candybars, chocolate, cotton candy, and other sweet items of snack food.Some of the categories and types of sugar confectionery include thefollowing:[9]Caramels: Derived from a mixture of sucrose, glucosesyrup, and milk products. The mixture does not crystallize, thusremains tacky.Chocolates: Bite-sized confectioneries generally madewith chocolate.Divinity: A nougat-like confectionery based on eggwhites with chopped nuts.Dodol: A toffee-like food delicacy popularin Indonesia, Malaysia, and the PhilippinesDragée: Sugar-coatedalmonds and other types of sugar panned candy.Fondant: Preparedfrom a warm mixture of glucose syrup and sucrose, which ispartially crystallized. The fineness of the crystallites results ina creamy texture.Fudge: Made by boiling milk and sugar to thesoft-ball stage. In the US, it tends to bechocolate-flavored.Halvah: Confectionery based on tahini, a pastemade from ground sesame seeds.Hard candy: Based on sugars cooked tothe hard-crack stage. Examples include suckers (known as boiledsweets in British English), lollipops, jawbreakers (orgobstoppers), lemon drops, peppermint drops and disks, candy canes,rock candy, etc. Also included are types often mixed with nuts suchas brittle. Others contain flavorings including coffee such asKopiko.Ice cream: Frozen, flavoured cream, often containing smallpieces of chocolate, fruits and/or nuts.Jelly candies: Includingthose based on sugar and starch, pectin, gum, or gelatin such asTurkish delight (lokum), jelly beans, gumdrops, jujubes, gummies,etc.Liquorice: Containing extract of the liquorice root. Chewierand more resilient than gum/gelatin candies, but still designed forswallowing. For example, Liquorice allsorts. Has a similar taste tostar anise.Marshmallow: "Peeps" (a trade name), circus peanuts,fluffy puff, Jet-Puffed Marshmallows etc.Marzipan: An almond-basedconfection, doughy in consistency, served in several differentways.Mithai: A generic term for confectionery in India, typicallymade from dairy products and/or some form of flour. Sugar ormolasses are used as sweeteners.Tablet: A crumbly milk-based softand hard candy, based on sugars cooked to the soft ball stage.Comes in several forms, such as wafers and heart shapes. Not to beconfused with tableting, a method of candy production.Taffy orchews: A candy that is folded many times above 120 °F (50 °C),incorporating air bubbles thus reducing its density and making itopaque.
Noodles Recipes 2.30
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Noodles are a staple food in many cultures made from unleaveneddough which is stretched, extruded, or rolled flat and cut into oneof a variety of shapes. A single noodle can be made, eaten, orextracted from a serving of noodles, but it is far more common toserve and eat many at once, and thus more common to see the pluralform of the word.While long, thin strips may be the most common,many varieties of noodles are cut into waves, helices, tubes,strings, or shells, or folded over, or cut into other shapes.Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cookingoil or salt added. They are often pan-fried or deep-fried. Noodlesare often served with an accompanying sauce or in a soup. Noodlescan be refrigerated for short-term storage, or dried and stored forfuture use. The material composition or geocultural origin must bespecified when discussing noodles. The word derives from the Germanword Nudel.The oldest evidence of noodle consumption, from 4,000years ago, has been found in ChinaBlack noodlesCartnoodleCouscousCup NoodlesFideoFried noodlesFrozen noodlesInstantnoodleMohnnudelRice noodlesRicevermicelliSchupfnudelSpätzleChinkiang pot cover noodlesBiangbiangnoodlesCellophane noodlesCumianDragon beard noodlesHenan braisednoodlesJook-sing noodlesLamianLai funMigan (noodle)MisuaMixian(noodle)Mung bean sheetsOil noodlesPaomoRamenRice vermicelliSaangmeinShahe fenShrimp roe noodlesSilver needle noodlesSuper NoodlesChicken FlavourYoumianYi meinGong Zai MianWontonnoodlesBakmiIndomieDemae ItchoMaruchanNissin ChikinRamenRamenSanuki udonShirataki noodlesSobaSōmenUdonWankosobaYakisobaDemae ItchoMaruchanNissin Chikin RamenRamenSanukiudonShirataki noodlesSobaSōmenUdonWanko sobaYakisobaKhanom chinRicenoodlesChow mein sandwichFried noodlesGuthukInstantnoodleJajangmyeonKesmeKhow sueyLapingMaggi gorengMee BandungMuarMeeshayMì QuảngMie ayamMont diNan gyi thohkNoodle soupOhn nokhao swèPancitPancit MalabonSaiminSilesian dumplingsSingapore-stylenoodlesSoto ayamThenthukBanmianChar kway teowCurry MeeDuck soupnoodlesHae meeHokkien meeLaksaLor meeMee pokMee siamMi rebusMiegorengBanmianChar kway teowHae meeHokkien meeKatong LaksaMee pokMeesiamMee SotoMie gorengMi rebusSatay bee hoonSingapore stylenoodlesVegetarian bee hoonWonton noodlesDrunken noodlesKhao soiMikropPhat si ioKuy teavNam ngiaoPad ThaiRat naYong Tau Foo
Baking Cake 2.30
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See the best cake recipes. Trusted recipes for chocolate cake,white cake, banana cakes, and carrot cakes with photos and tipsfrom home cooks.Cake Mix Cake RecipesHoliday Cake RecipesChocolateCake RecipesGerman Chocolate Cake RecipesBlack Forest CakeRecipesChocolate Cupcake RecipesChocolate FrostingRecipesCheesecake RecipesSheet Cake RecipesCoffee Cake RecipesBundtCake From a Mix RecipesChocolate Cake From a Mix RecipesYellow CakeFrom a Mix RecipesCupcakes From a Mix RecipesLayer Cake From a MixRecipesCoconut Cake From a Mix RecipesPina Colada Rum CakeBakingpowderBaking powder is a raising agent. It's made up of bicarbonateof soda and cream of tartar. Cream of tartar is an acid whichactivates the bicarbonate of soda causing it to release carbondioxide and aerate the cake with the addition of moisture. It'soften used in baking, especially in creamed cakes. More aboutbaking powderBicarbonate of sodaBicarbonate of sodaBicarbonate ofsoda can also be bought separately but it's still necessary to addan acid and moisture to activate it. Common acids that you willfind in recipes include cream of tartar, buttermilk and milk.Bicarbonate of soda has a strong flavour so care must be taken notto use too much. It's best used in full-flavoured cakes such asginger cake. More about bicarbonate of sodaButterWe haven'tincluded many fresh ingredients in our list as most, such ascarrots for Carrot cake, you'll want to buy as and when you needthem. However, butter is a must for many cake recipes and is auseful all-round item to have in your fridge. Butter imparts adistinctive flavour and is ideal for creamed cakes where it'sbeaten together with sugar to incorporate air into the mixture andproduce a light cake.ChocolateChocolateIngredients: for breaking upto use as chocolate chips and for making rich chocolatey caketoppings. In most recipes a plain chocolate of around 40 per centcocoa solids is adequate unless otherwise stated. You might alsowant to keep a stash of white and milk chocolate for yourrecipes.Chocolate cake recipesCocoa Another key ingredient forchocolate cake recipes, cocoa provides an intense chocolateflavour. It has the benefit of not needing to be melted and iscompletely stable.Eggs Another all-round useful ingredient, eggsare used in cake batters to trap air in the cake as well as to bindthe ingredients together. At Good Food we usually use large eggsunless otherwise stated in the recipe. Plain flour and self-raisingare white (refined) flours that are essential for baking.Self-raising flour is made from plain flour with a small amount ofbaking powder mixed in (1/2 tsp per 100g). If a recipe states plainflour, it will also specify a raising agent such as baking powderor bicarbonate of soda to ensure a good rise. Wholemeal flour isnot generally used in cake recipes as it provides a denser textureso would usually be mixed with plain or self-raising flours. Moreabout flourCaster sugar, Icing sugar, Brown sugarsCaster sugar isthe most popular sugar for cake making, particularly for creamedcakes as its fine texture blends well. Icing sugar, as the namesuggests, is the key ingredient for both glacé icing (icing sugarmixed with water) and buttercream (icing sugar mixed with butter).It's also useful to have a variety of brown sugars; light and darksoft brown sugar and muscovado all have distinctive flavours andare commonly found in fruit and other richly flavoured cakes.Commonspices used in baking include ground cinnamon, ground mixed spice,ground ginger and nutmeg. It's worth having jars of these to handand buying others as needed.Sunflower oil has many culinary usesand it's ideal for baking as it has a mild flavour which allows theother ingredients in a cake to shine through.Vanilla extractVanillaextract is a storecupboard essential
Philippines Recipes 2.30
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Philippine cuisine (Filipino: Lutuing Pilipino or PagkaingPilipino) consists of the food, preparation methods, and eatingcustoms found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the foodassociated with it have evolved over many centuries from theirAustronesian origins to a mixed cuisine of Malay, Indian, Spanish,Chinese, and American, as well as other Asian Indian cuisineadapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.Dishes rangefrom the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, tothe elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas of Spanishorigin. Popular dishes include: lechón[ (whole roasted pig),longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta(omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar,oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomatosauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), puchero(beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or porksimmered in a tomato sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail andvegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash,eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste),crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened inpineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit(noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).Filipinocuisine centres around the combination of sweet (tamis), sour(asim), and salty (alat), although in Bicol, the Cordilleras andamong Muslim Filipinos, spicy (anghang) is a base of cookingflavor.Counterpoint is a feature in Philippine cuisine whichnormally comes in a pairing of something sweet with somethingsalty, and results in surprisingly pleasing combinations. Examplesinclude: champorado (a sweet cocoa rice porridge), being pairedwith tuyo (salted, sun-dried fish); dinuguan (a savory stew made ofpig's blood and innards), paired with puto (sweet, steamed ricecakes); unripe fruits such as mangoes (which are only slightlysweet but very sour), are eaten dipped in salt or bagoong; the useof cheese (which is salty) in sweetcakes (such as bibingka andputo), as well as an ice cream flavoring.Vinegar is a commoningredient. Adobo is popular not solely for its simplicity and easeof preparation, but also for its ability to be stored for dayswithout spoiling, and even improve in flavor with a day or two ofstorage. Tinapa is a smoke-cured fish while tuyo, daing, and dangitare corned, sun-dried fish popular because they can last for weekswithout spoiling, even without refrigeration.Cooking and eating inthe Philippines has traditionally been an informal and communalaffair centered around the family kitchen. Filipinos traditionallyeat three main meals a day: agahan or almusal (breakfast),tanghalían (lunch), and hapunan (dinner) plus an afternoon snackcalled meriénda (also called minandál or minindál). Snacking isnormal. Dinner, while still the main meal, is smaller than othercountries. Usually, either breakfast or lunch is the largest meal.Food tends to be served all at once and not in courses. Unlike manyof their Asian counterparts Filipinos do not eat with chopsticks.Due to Western influence, food is often eaten using flatware—forks,knives, spoons—but the primary pairing of utensils used at aFilipino dining table is that of spoon and fork, not knife andfork. The traditional way of eating is with the hands, especiallydry dishes such as inihaw or prito. The diner will take a bite ofthe main dish, then eat rice pressed together with his fingers.This practice, known as kamayan, is rarely seen in urbanized areas.However, Filipinos tend to feel the spirit of kamayan when eatingamidst nature during out-of-town trips, beach vacations, and townfiesta
Desserts 2.30
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Desser is a course that concludes a main meal. The course usuallyconsists of sweet foods and beverages, such as dessert wine orliqueurs, but may include coffee, cheeses, nuts, or other savoryitems. In some parts of the world, such as much of central andwestern Africa, there is no tradition of a dessert course toconclude a meal.The term "dessert" can apply to many foods, such ascakes, tarts, cookies, biscuits, gelatins, pastries, ice creams,pies, puddings, custards, and sweet soups. Fruit is also commonlyfound in dessert courses because of its naturally occurringsweetness. Some cultures sweeten foods that are more commonlysavory to create desserts.Kinds of DessertAbnabatAkanésBBesanbarfiBonbonBourbon ballBrittleBubble gumBuckeye candyBulkconfectioneryButterscotchCCajetaCalissonCandied fruitCandyCandyappleCandy bouquetCandy caneCandy cigaretteCandy cornCandypumpkinCaramelCaramel appleCaramel cornCatàniesCezeryeChewinggumChikkiChoco pieChocolateChocolate ballsChocolatebarChocolate-coated peanutChocolate-covered coffeebeanChocolate-covered raisinChocolate truffleChurchkhelaCinnamontoothpickCocadasCoconut candyComfitCordialCottoncandyCuberdonDDivinityDodolDominosteinDragéeDulce de lecheEEdibleink printingFFālūdhajFondantFruitsoursFudgeGGajakGazGeplakGibraltarrockGlazeGobstopperGozinakiHHalvaHanukkah geltHard candyHawflakesIImartiIschokladJJelly beanJordan almondsKKa'í LadrilloKajuKatliKakinada khajaKamarcutKarah ParshadKesaria PedaKettlecornKonfytKoserevaLLacabònLadduLakhamariLemondropLiquoriceLiquorice allsortsMMampostialManjarMaple sugarMapletaffyMarron glacéMarshmallowMarshmallow cremeMarzipanMendiantMilkchocolateMintMisriModjeskaMooncakeMoustalevriaMozartkugelNNoghlNonpareilsNougatOOblaatOrangejelly candyPPaçocaPashmakPastilaPastillePeanut butter cupPecan logrollPenuchePeperoPersipanPirate coinsPirulínPolkagrisPontefractcakePoolakiPtasie mleczkoQQueijadinhaRibbon candyRockRockcandyRocky roaRoyal icingRum ballRussian candySalt water taffySaltyliquoriceSesame seed candySherbet (powder)SingoriSohanSoorploomSouth Asian sweetsSprinklesSpunkStick candyStrelacandySuccadeSugar cakeSugar miceSugar pasteSugarplumSuikerboonSukhdiSzaloncukorTabletingTarasariTejaThroatlozengeTiffinTooth-friendlyTurkish delightTurrónZefir
Cheesecakes 2.30
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Cheesecake is a sweet dessert consisting of one or more layers. Themain, and thickest layer, consists of a mixture of soft, freshcheese (typically cream cheese or ricotta), eggs, and sugar; ifthere is a bottom layer it often consists of a crust or base madefrom crushed digestive biscuits (cookies in USA), graham crackers,pastry, or sponge cake.[1] It may be baked or unbaked (usuallyrefrigerated). Cheesecake is usually sweetened with sugar and maybe flavoured or topped with fruit, whipped cream, nuts, biscuits,fruit sauce, and/or chocolate syrup. Cheesecake can be prepared inmany flavors, such as strawberry, pumpkin, key lime, chocolate,Oreo, chestnut, or toffee.Almost all modern cheesecakes in theUnited States and Canada use cream cheese; in Italy, cheesecakesuse ricotta; Germany, the Netherlands, and Poland use quark.Cheesecakes are most easily baked in a leak-proof springform pan,often paired with a water bath to more evenly distribute the heat.Because of the high density of most cheesecakes, they continuebaking for some time after removal from an oven.The early Greeksconsidered it a cake. Some modern authors point to the presence ofmany eggs, the sole source of leavening, as proof that it is atorte. Still others claim that the separate crust, the softfilling, and the absence of flour prove that it is a custardpie.Cheesecakes can be broadly categorized into two basic types:baked and unbaked. Each comes in a variety of styles determined byregion:
Cupcakes 2.30
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A cupcake (also British English: fairy cake; Hiberno English: bun;Australian English: fairy cake or patty cake) is a small cakedesigned to serve one person, which may be baked in a small thinpaper or aluminum cup. As with larger cakes, icing and other cakedecorations, such as candy, may be applied.Cupcake recipesAmass-produced Hostess CupCake, a typical "snack cake" style ofcupcakeA standard cupcake uses the same basic ingredients asstandard-sized cakes: butter, sugar, eggs, and flour. Nearly anyrecipe that is suitable for a layer cake can be used to bakecupcakes. The cake batter used for cupcakes may be flavored or haveother ingredients stirred in, such as raisins, berries, nuts, orchocolate chips.Because their small size is more efficient for heatconduction, cupcakes bake much faster than a normal layeredcake.Cupcakes may be topped with frosting or other cakedecorations. They may be filled with frosting, fruit, or pastrycream. For bakers making a small number of filled cupcakes, this isusually accomplished by using a spoon or knife to scoop a smallhole in the top of the cupcake. Another method is to just insertthe pastry bag in the middle of the cupcake. In commercialbakeries, the filling may be injected using a syringe. Elaboratelydecorated cupcakes may be made for special occasions.VariantsAbutterfly cakeA cake in a mug is a variant that gained popularityon many internet cooking forums and mailing lists. The techniqueuses a mug as its cooking vessel and can be done in a microwaveoven. The recipe often takes fewer than five minutes to prepare.The cake rises by mixing vegetable oil (usually olive oil orsunflower oil) into a mixture of flour and other ingredients - asthe oil in the mixture heats up, it creates air pockets in themixture which allows the cake to quickly rise. This variant hasbecome popularised in recent years by the presence of numerousvideos on social media websites, each claiming to detail thefastest method to create the finished product.A cake in a jar isanother way of making cupcakes. The baker uses a glass jar insteadof muffin tins or cupcake liners.A butterfly cake is a variant ofcupcake, also called fairy cake for its fairy-like "wings".[9] Theycan be made from any flavor of cake. The top of the fairy cake iscut off or carved out with a spoon, and cut in half. Then, buttercream, whipped cream or other sweet filling (e.g. jam) is spreadinto the hole. Finally, the two cut halves are stuck into thebutter cream to resemble butterfly wings. The wings of the cake areoften decorated using icing to form various patterns.Elaboratelyfrosted cupcakes may be made for special occasions such as babyshowers, graduations, or holidays.A cake ball is an individualportion of cake, round like a chocolate truffle, that is coated inchocolate.These are typically formed from crumbled cake mixed withfrosting, rather than being baked as a sphere.A gourmet cupcake isa somewhat recent variant of cupcake. Gourmet cupcakes are largeand filled cupcakes, based around a variety of flavor themes, suchas Tiramisu or Cappuccino. In recent years there has been anupcropping of stores that sell only gourmet cupcakes inmetropolitan areas.As an alternative to a plate of individualcakes, some bakers place standard cupcakes into a pattern and frostthem to create a large design, such as a basket of flowers or aturtle.
Baking Recipes 2.26
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Baking is a method of cooking food that uses prolonged dry heat,normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones. Themost common baked item is bread but many other types of foods arebaked.Heat is gradually transferred "from the surface of cakes,cookies, and breads to their centre. As heat travels through ittransforms batters and doughs into baked goods with a firm drycrust and a softer centre"..Baking is a method of cooking food thatuses prolonged dry heat, normally in an oven, but also in hotashes, or on hot stones. The most common baked item is bread butmany other types of foods are baked. Heat is gradually transferred"from the surface of cakes, cookies, and breads to their centre. Asheat travels through it transforms batters and doughs into bakedgoods with a firm dry crust and a softer centre". Baking can becombined with grilling to produce a hybrid barbecue variant byusing both methods simultaneously, or one after the other. Bakingis related to barbecuing because the concept of the masonry oven issimilar to that of a smoke pit.Baking chocolate, also referred toas bitter chocolate, cooking chocolate and unsweetened chocolate,is a type of chocolate that is prepared or manufactured for baking.Biscuit – a term used for a variety of baked, commonly flour-basedfood products.[1] The term is applied to two distinct products inNorth America and the United Kingdom,[2] and is also distinguishedfrom U.S. versions in the Commonwealth of Nations and Europe.GroundbiscuitBread – a staple food prepared from a dough of flour andwater, usually by baking.[3]See also: List of breads, List of brandname breads, and List of quick breadsBagel – a bread productoriginating in Poland, traditionally shaped by hand into the formof a ring from yeasted wheat dough, roughly hand-sized, which isfirst boiled for a short time in water and then baked.Bread roll –a small, often round loaf of bread[4][5] served as a mealaccompaniment (eaten plain or with butter)See also: List of breadrollsFlatbread – Brownie – a flat, baked dessert square that wasdeveloped in the United States at the end of the 19th century[6]and popularized in both the U.S. and Canada during the first halfof the 20th centuryCake – a form of sweet dessert that is typicallybaked. In its oldest forms, cakes were modifications of breads butnow cover a wide range of preparations that can be simple orelaborate.See also: List of cakesCasserole – a large, deep dishused both in the oven and as a serving vessel. The word is alsoused for the food cooked and served in such a vessel, with thecookware itself called a casserole dish or casserole pan.See also:List of casserole dishesBaked pasta casserole dishesBakedzitiLasagneMacaroni and cheeseMacaroni casseroleMacaronipiePastitsioCookie – a small, flat, sweet, baked good, usuallycontaining flour, eggs, sugar, and either butter, cooking oil oranother oil or fat.See also: List of cookiesCracker – typicallymade from flour, flavorings or seasonings such as salt, herbs,seeds, and cheese may be added to the dough or sprinkled on topbefore baking.See also: List of crackersCustard – a variety ofculinary preparations based on a cooked mixture of milk or creamand egg yolk. Depending on how much egg or thickener is used,custard may vary in consistency.See also: List of custarddessertsMilk-based productsBaked milk – can be prepared by leavinga jug of boiled milk in an oven for a day or for a night until itis coated with a brown crustPastry –Pie – a baked dish which isusually made of a pastry dough casing that covers or completelycontains a filling of various sweet or savoury ingredients.Pizza –nCalzone – Tart – a baked dish consisting of a filling over apastry base with an open top not covered with pastryTwice-bakedfoods – foods that are baked twice in their preparationViennoiserie– baked goods made from a yeast-leavened dough in a manner similarto bread
Roasting Recipes 2.30
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Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot airenvelops the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperaturesof at least 150 °C (~300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or otherheat source. Roasting can enhance flavor through caramelization andMaillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting usesindirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slowercooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root andbulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially redmeat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Aroast joint of meat can take one, two, even three hours to cook—theresulting meat is tender. Also, meats and vegetables prepared inthis way are described as "roasted", e.g., roasted chicken orroasted squash.For roasting, the food may be placed on a rack, in aroasting pan or, to ensure even application of heat, may be rotatedon a spit or rotisserie. If a pan is used, the juice can beretained for use in gravy, Yorkshire pudding, etc. During ovenroasting, hot air circulates around the meat, cooking all sidesevenly. There are several plans for roasting meat: low-temperaturecooking, high-temperature cooking, and a combination of both. Eachmethod can be suitable, depending on the food and the tastes of thepeople.A low-temperature oven, 95 °C to 160 °C (200 °F to 325 °F),is best when cooking with large cuts of meat, turkey and wholechickens.[2] This is not technically roasting temperature, but itis called slow-roasting. The benefit of slow-roasting an item isless moisture loss and a more tender product. More of the collagenthat makes meat tough is dissolved in slow cooking. At trueroasting temperatures, 200 °C (400 °F) or more, the water insidethe muscle is lost at a high rate.Cooking at high temperatures isbeneficial if the cut is tender enough—as in filet mignon or striploin—to be finished cooking before the juices escape. A reason forhigh temperature roasting is to brown the outside of the food,similar to browning food in a pan before pot roasting or stewingit. Fast cooking gives more variety of flavor, because the outsideis brown while the center is much less done.The combination methoduses high heat just at either the beginning or the end of thecooking process, with most of the cooking at a low temperature.This method produces the golden-brown texture and crust, butmaintains more of the moisture than simply cooking at a hightemperature, although the product will not be as moist aslow-temperature cooking the whole time. Searing and then turningdown to low is also beneficial when a dark crust and caramelizedflavor is desired for the finished product.In general, in eithercase, the meat is removed from heat before it has finished cookingand left to sit for a few minutes, while the inside cooks furtherfrom the residual heat content, known as carry over cooking.Theobjective in any case is to retain as much moisture as possible,while providing the texture and color. As meat cooks, the structureand especially the collagen breaks down, allowing juice to come outof the meat. So meat is juiciest at about medium rare while thejuice is coming out. During roasting, meats and vegetables arefrequently basted on the surface with butter, lard, or oil toreduce the loss of moisture by evaporation. In recent times,plastic oven bags have become popular for roasts. These cut cookingtimes and reduce the loss of moisture during roasting, but reduceflavor development from Maillard browning, somewhat more like(boiled or steamed) stew or pot roast. They are particularlypopular for turkeys.
Finger Food 2.30
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Fingerfood Recipes for your Party - Salsa Dips Mexican Food...Finger food is food meant to be eaten directly using the hands,in contrast to food eaten with a knife and fork, chopsticks, orother utensils. In some cultures, food is almost always eaten withthe hands; for example, Ethiopian cuisine is eaten by rollingvarious dishes up in injera bread. In the South Asian subcontinent,food is traditionally always eaten with hands. Foods consideredstreet foods are frequently, though not exclusively, fingerfoods.In the Western world, finger foods are often eitherappetizers (hors d'oeuvres) or entree/main course items. In theWestern world, examples of generally accepted finger food areminiature meat pies, sausage rolls, sausages on sticks, cheese andolives on sticks, chicken drumsticks or wings, spring rolls,miniature quiches, samosas, sandwiches, Merenda or other such basedfoods, such as pitas or items in buns, bhajjis, potato wedges, volau vents, several other such small items and risotto balls(arancini). Other well-known foods that are generally eaten withthe hands include burger, pizza, hot dogs, fruit and bread. Dessertitems such as cookies, pastries, ice cream in cones, or ice popsare often eaten with the hands but are not, in common parlance,considered finger foods. In East Asia, foods like pancakes orflatbreads and street foods such as chuan (串, also pronouncedchuan) are often eaten with the hands.In many Western countriesthere are catering businesses that supply finger foods for eventssuch as weddings, engagements, birthdays and other milestonecelebrations. For weddings, in particular, finger foods arebecoming more popular because they are less expensive and offermore flexibility with menu choices.[citation needed] Gourmet horsd'oeuvres such as quiches, pâté, caviar, and tea sandwiches aresuitable for a formal event, whereas more familiar food such assliced fruits, deli trays, crackers, and cookies are preferred atmore casual celebrations.
Pies Baking Recipes 2.30
CamBo Media
Pie RecipesWhether you're craving apple, chocolate, pecan,strawberry or pumpkin pie, we have best pie recipes with tips,photos to help make it right--even the crust!Apple PieRecipesChocolate Pie RecipesCustard and Cream Pie RecipesDessertTart RecipesFruit Pie RecipesNo-Bake Pie RecipesPecan PieRecipesPie Crust RecipesPumpkin Pie RecipesSlab Pie RecipesSweetPotato Pie RecipesVintage Pie RecipesFor example:Place a bakingsheet on the lowest oven rack and preheat to 425 degrees F for 30minutes. Place the pie on the hot baking sheet; lower thetemperature to 375 degrees F. Bake until golden, 1 hour to 1 hour,10 minutes. (Cover the edges with foil if they brown too quickly.)Cool on a rack.2. Apple-Berry Make Apple Pie, adding 1 extratablespoon flour and 1 teaspoon vanilla to the filling. Off theheat, stir in 1 cup mixed berries. Top with a lattice crust, brushwith a beaten egg and sprinkle with coarse sugar.3. Apple-CheddarMake Apple Pie, adding 2/3 cup diced sharp cheddar to the cooledfilling before baking.4. Tart Apple Make Apple Pie with very thinlysliced Granny Smith apples; toss with apple cider instead of lemonjuice. Don't cook the filling. Omit the 4 tablespoons butter; tosswith 2 extra tablespoons flour, the cinnamon, salt and 1/2 teaspoonnutmeg.5. Apple Crumble Make Apple Pie, adding 1 extra tablespoonflour to the filling. Off the heat, add 1/2 cup sour cream and 1/2teaspoon nutmeg. Omit the top crust. Mix 1/2 cup flour, 1 cup oats,3/4 cup each chopped walnuts and brown sugar, 6 tablespoons meltedbutter and a pinch of salt. Drop in clumps over the filling.6.Apple Strudel Make Apple Pie with grated peeled Golden Deliciousapples. Don't cook the filling. Omit the 4 tablespoons butter; tossthe apples with the cinnamon, salt, 2 extra tablespoons flour and1/2 cup raisins. Dot with 1 extra tablespoon butter.7.Apple-Pear-Ginger Make Apple Pie, replacing half of the apples withpears and using ground ginger instead of cinnamon. Cut the topcrust into decorative shapes; arrange on top of the filling. Brushwith a beaten egg and sprinkle with coarse sugar.8. Apple-FigCombine 1 1/2 pounds sliced peeled apples, 1/2 pound each driedapples and figs, 1/8 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons lemon juice and 1/2teaspoon cinnamon in a food processor; finely chop. Don't cook thefilling. Assemble as for Apple Pie, dotting with 2 extratablespoons butter. Bake 50 minutes.A pie is a baked dish which isusually made of a pastry dough casing that covers or completelycontains a filling of various sweet or savoury ingredients.Pies aredefined by their crusts. A filled pie (also single-crust orbottom-crust), has pastry lining the baking dish, and the fillingis placed on top of the pastry but left open. A top-crust pie hasthe filling in the bottom of the dish and is covered with a pastryor other covering before baking. A two-crust pie has the fillingcompletely enclosed in the pastry shell. Shortcrust pastry is atypical kind of pastry used for pie crusts, but many things can beused, including baking powder biscuits, mashed potatoes, andcrumbs.Pies can be a variety of sizes, ranging from bite-size toones designed for multiple servings.Pie throwingCream filled ortopped pies are favorite props for slapstick humor. Throwing a piein a person's face has been a staple of film comedy since BenTurpin received one in Mr. Flip in 1909.[11] More recently, pieinghas also become a political act; some activists throw cream pies atpoliticians and other public figures as a form of protest.
Sandwich Recipes 2.29
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A sandwich is a food item consisting of one or more types of food,such as vegetables, sliced cheese or meat, placed on or betweenslices of bread, or more generally any dish wherein two or morepieces of bread serve as a container or wrapper for some otherfood. The sandwich was originally a portable food item or fingerfood which began to be popular in the Western World. Todaysandwiches in various versions are found worldwide.Sandwiches are apopular type of lunch food, taken to work, school, or picnics to beeaten as part of a packed lunch. The bread can be used plain, or itcan be coated with one or more condiments such as mayonnaise ormustard to enhance the flavours and texture. As well as beinghomemade, sandwiches are also widely sold in restaurants and cafes,and are sometimes served hot as well as cold.There are both savourysandwiches, such as deli meat sandwiches, and sweet sandwiches,such as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.The sandwich isconsidered to be the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl ofSandwich, because of the claim that he was the eponymous inventorof this food combination. The Wall Street Journal has described itas Britain's "biggest contribution to gastronomy"Bacon, egg andcheese sandwichBeef on weckBLTBologna sandwichBonus JackBreakfastsandwichCheese dreamCheese sandwichCheeseburgerCheesesteakChickensandwichChow mein sandwichCiabatta Bacon CheeseburgerClubsandwichConey Island hot dogCrab cake sandwichCroissan'wichCubansandwichCudighiDagwood sandwichDenver sandwichDiablo sandwichDoubleDownEnormous Omelet SandwichFat sandwichFluffernutterFool's GoldLoafFrench dipFried-brain sandwichGerber sandwichHam and cheesesandwichHamburgerHamdogHorseshoe sandwichHot BrownItalianbeefItalian sandwichJucy LucyLimburger sandwichLobster rollLutherBurgerManwichMaxwell Street PolishMelt sandwichMonte CristosandwichMuffulettaPastrami on ryePatty meltPeanut butter and jellysandwichPeanut butter, banana and bacon sandwichPilgrimPo'boyPolish BoyPork tenderloin sandwichReuben sandwichRoast beefsandwichRunzaSailor sandwichSandwich loafSandwich wrapSausagesandwichSealed crustless sandwichSloppy joeSpiedieSt. PaulsandwichSteak sandwichSubmarine sandwichTavern sandwichTuna fishsandwichTurkey DevonshireVeggie burger
China 2.30
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Chinese cuisine includes styles originating from the diverseregions of China, as well as from Chinese people in other parts ofthe world including most Asian nations. The history of Chinesecuisine in China stretches back for thousands of years and haschanged from period to period and in each region according toclimate, imperial fashions, and local preferences. Over time,techniques and ingredients from the cuisines of other cultures wereintegrated into the cuisine of the Chinese people due both toimperial expansion and from the trade with nearby regions inpre-modern times, and from Europe and the New World in the modernperiod. In addition, dairy is rarely—if ever—used in any recipes inthe style.The "Eight Culinary Cuisines" of China[1] are Anhui,Cantonese, Fujian, Hunan, Jiangsu, Shandong, Sichuan, and Zhejiangcuisines.The staple foods of Chinese cooking include rice, noodles,vegetables, and sauces and seasonings.Regional cuisines A number ofdifferent styles contribute to Chinese cuisine but perhaps the bestknown and most influential are Cantonese cuisine, Shandong cuisine,Jiangsu cuisine (specifically Huaiyang cuisine) and Sichuancuisine.These styles are distinctive from one another due tofactors such as availability of resources, climate, geography,history, cooking techniques and lifestyle.[25] One style may favourthe use of lots of garlic and shallots over lots of chilli andspices, while another may favour preparing seafood over other meatsand fowl.Jiangsu cuisine favours cooking techniques such asbraising and stewing, while Sichuan cuisine employs baking, just toname a few. Hairy crab is a highly sought after local delicacy inShanghai, as it can be found in lakes within the region. Pekingduck and dim-sum are other popular dishes well known outside ofChina. Based on the raw materials and ingredients used, the methodof preparation and cultural differences, a variety of foods withdifferent flavors and textures are prepared in different regions ofthe country. Many traditional regional cuisines rely on basicmethods of preservation such as drying, salting, pickling andfermentation. RiceRice is a major staple food for people from ricefarming areas in southern China.[citation needed] Steamed rice,usually white rice, is the most commonly eaten form. Rice is alsoused to produce beers, wines and vinegars. Rice is one of the mostpopular foods in China and is used in many dishes. Glutinous rice("sticky rice") is a variety of rice used in many specialty Chinesedishes.Noodles Zhajiangmian (noodles with bean paste) is atraditional Beijing dish. Chinese noodlesChinese noodles come dryor fresh in a variety of sizes, shapes and textures and are oftenserved in soups or fried as toppings. Some varieties, such as ShouMian (寿面, literally noodles of longevity), are symbolic of longlife and good health according to Chinese tradition. Noodles can beserved hot or cold with different toppings, with broth, andoccasionally dry (as is the case with mi-fun). Noodles are commonlymade with rice flour or wheat flour, but other flours such assoybean are also used.SoybeansTofu is made of soybeans and isanother popular food product that supplies protein. Other productssuch as soy milk, soy paste, soy oil, and fermented soy sauce arealso important in Chinese cooking.Wheat In wheat-farming areas inNorthern China, people largely rely on flour-based food, such asnoodles, breads, jiaozi (a kind of Chinese dumplings), and mantou(a type of steamed buns). VegetablesSome common vegetables used inChinese cuisine include Chinese leaves, bok choy (Chinese cabbage),dao-mieu (Chinese spinach), on choy, yu choy, bitter melon, andChinese broccoli or gailan (guy-lahn). Other vegetables includebean sprouts, pea vine tips, watercress, celery.
Beef Steaks and Filets Recipes 2.30
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Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle. Beef can beharvested from bulls, heifers or steers. Its acceptability as afood source varies in different parts of the world.Beef muscle meatcan be cut into roasts, short ribs or steak (filet mignon, sirloinsteak, rump steak, rib steak, rib eye steak, hanger steak, etc.)Some cuts are processed (corned beef or beef jerky), and trimmings,usually mixed with meat from older, leaner cattle, are ground,minced or used in sausages. The blood is used in some varieties ofblood sausage. Other parts that are eaten include the oxtail,liver, tongue, tripe from the reticulum or rumen, glands(particularly the pancreas and thymus, referred to as sweetbread),the heart, the brain (although forbidden where there is a danger ofbovine spongiform encephalopathy, BSE), the kidneys, and the tendertesticles of the bull (known in the United States as calf fries,prairie oysters, or Rocky Mountain oysters). Some intestines arecooked and eaten as-is, but are more often cleaned and used asnatural sausage casings. The bones are used for making beefstock.Beef from steers and heifers is very similar. According tothe most recent National Beef Quality Audit, heifer carcasses hadslightly more marbling than steer carcasses, but USDA quality gradewas not significantly different.[1] Depending on economics, thenumber of heifers kept for breeding varies. The meat from olderbulls is usually tougher, so it is frequently used for mince (knownas ground beef in the United States). Cattle raised for beef may beallowed to roam free on grasslands, or may be confined at somestage in pens as part of a large feeding operation called a feedlot(or concentrated animal feeding operation), where they are usuallyfed a ration of grain, protein, roughage and a vitamin/mineralpreblend.Beef is the third most widely consumed meat in the world,accounting for about 25% of meat production worldwide, after porkand poultry at 38% and 30% respectively. In absolute numbers, theUnited States, Brazil, and the People's Republic of China are theworld's three largest consumers of beef; however, Uruguay has thehighest beef and veal consumption per capita, followed by Argentinaand Brazil. According to the data from OECD, the average Uruguayanate over 42 kg (93 lb) of beef or veal in 2014, representing thehighest beef/veal consumption per capita in the world. Incomparison, the average American consumed only about 24 kg (53 lb)beef or veal in the same year, while African countries, such asMozambique, Ghana, and Nigeria, consumed the least beef or veal percapita.A steak is a meat generally sliced perpendicular to themuscle fibers, potentially including a bone. Exceptions, in whichthe meat is sliced parallel to the fibers, include the skirt steakthat is cut from the plate, the flank steak that is cut from theabdominal muscles, and the Silverfinger steak that is cut from theloin and includes three rib bones. When the word "steak" is usedwithout qualification, it generally refers to a beefsteak. In alarger sense, there are also fish steaks, ground meat steaks, porksteak and many more varieties.Steaks are usually grilled] but theycan be pan-fried, or broiled. Steak is often grilled in an attemptto replicate the flavor of steak cooked over the glowing coals ofan open fire.[1] Steak can also be cooked in sauce, such as insteak and kidney pie, or minced and formed into patties, such ashamburgers.Steaks are also cut from grazing animals, usuallyfarmed, other than cattle, including bison, camel, goat, horse,kangaroo,] sheep, ostrich, pigs, reindeer, turkey and deer, as wellas various types of fish, especially salmon and large pelagic fishsuch as swordfish, shark and marlin. For some meats, such as pork,lamb and mutton, chevon and veal, these cuts are often referred toas chops. Some cured meat, such as gammon, is commonly served assteak.
Salad 2.30
CamBo Media
Salad Recipes - Cucumber Tomato Avocado Green Salads and more.........A salad is a dish consisting of small pieces of food,which may be mixed with a sauce or salad dressing.[1][2] They aretypically served cold. Salads can incorporate a variety of foodsincluding vegetables, fruits, cheese, cooked meat, eggs, grains andnuts.Garden salads use a base of leafy greens like lettuce,arugula, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the wordsalad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other typesinclude bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad, and Japanesesōmen salad (a noodle-based salad). The sauce used to flavor asalad is commonly called a salad dressing; well-known types includeranch, Thousand Island, and vinaigrette. Vinaigrette comes in manyvarieties; one version is a mixture of olive oil, balsamic vinegar,herbs and seasonings.Most salads are served cold, although some,such as south German potato salad, are served warm. Some considerthe warmth of a dish a factor that excludes it from the saladcategory calling the warm mixture a casserole, a sandwich toppingor more specifically, name it for the ingredients which compriseit.Salads may be served at any point during a meal, suchas:Appetizer salads, light, smaller portion-salads to stimulate theappetite as the first course of the meal.Side salads, to accompanythe main course as a side dish.Main course salads, usuallycontaining a portion of heartier fare, such as chicken breast,salmon or slices of beef.Dessert salads, sweet versions containingfruit, gelatin, sweeteners and/or whipped cream, or just fruit,which is called a fruit saladTypes of saladsGreen saladA greensalad or garden salad is most often composed of leafy vegetablessuch as lettuce varieties, spinach, or rocket (arugula). The saladleaves may be cut or torn into bite-sized fragments and tossedtogether (called a tossed salad), or may be placed in apredetermined arrangement (a composed salad). VegetablesaladVegetables other than greens may be used in a salad. Commonraw vegetables used in a salad include cucumbers, peppers,tomatoes, onions, spring onions, red onions, carrots, celery, andradishes. Other ingredients, such as mushrooms, avocado, olives,hard boiled egg, artichoke hearts, heart of palm, roasted red bellpeppers, green beans, croutons, cheeses, meat (e.g. bacon,chicken), or seafood (e.g. tuna, shrimp), are sometimes added tosalads.Bound saladA "bound" salad can be composed (arranged) ortossed (put in a bowl and mixed with a thick dressing). They areassembled with thick sauces such as mayonnaise. One portion of atrue bound salad will hold its shape when placed on a plate with anice-cream scoop. Examples of bound salad include tuna salad, pastasalad, chicken salad, egg salad, and potato salad.Bound salads areoften used as sandwich fillings. They are popular at picnics andbarbecues, because they can be made ahead of time andrefrigerated.Main course saladsMain course salads (also known as"dinner salads"[9] and commonly known as "entrée salads" in NorthAmerica) may contain grilled or fried chicken pieces, seafood suchas grilled or fried shrimp or a fish steak such as tuna, mahi-mahi,or salmon or sliced steak, such as sirloin or skirt. Caesar salad,Chef salad, Cobb salad, Chinese chicken salad and Michigan saladare dinner salads.Fruit saladsFruit salads are made of fruit, andinclude the fruit cocktail that can be made fresh or from cannedfruit.Dessert saladsDessert salads rarely include leafy greens andare often sweet. Common variants are made with gelatin or whippedcream; e.g. jello salad, pistachio salad, and ambrosia. Other formsof dessert salads include snickers salad, glorified rice, andcookie salad Composed saladA composed salad is a salad arranged ona plate rather than put into a bowl It can be used as a meal initself rather than as a part of a meal
Wedding Cakes 1.30
CamBo Media
A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptionsfollowing dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake isserved at a wedding breakfast, note that 'wedding breakfast' doesnot mean the meal will be held in the morning but at a timefollowing the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture,the cake is usually on display and served to guests at thereception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring goodluck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are moreof a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served tothe guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier forthe bride and groom to share.Wedding cakes come in a variety ofsizes, depending on the number of guests the cake will serve.Modern pastry chefs and cake designers use various ingredients andtools to create a cake that usually reflects the personalities ofthe couple. Marzipan, fondant, gum paste, buttercream, andchocolate are among the popular ingredients used. Cakes range inprice along with size and components. Cakes are usually priced on aper-person, or per-slice, basis. Prices can range from a fewdollars to a few hundred dollars per-person or slice, depending onthe pastry chef who is hired to make the cake. Wedding cakes andcake decorating in general have become a certain pop culture symbolin western society. In America TV shows such as Cake Boss orAmazing Wedding Cakes have become popular and are trending intoday’s popular culture.Wedding cake was originally a luxury item,and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake,the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and earlyAmerica were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipanand icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of thereception. Today, many flavors and configurations are available inaddition to the traditional all-white tiered cakeWedding caketoppers are models or art pieces that sit atop the cake. The mostcommon type of cake topper features a representation of a bride andgroom in wedding attire. This custom was dominant in US weddings inthe 1950s, where it represented togetherness. Wedding toppers todayare often figures that indicate shared hobbies or other passions,if they are used at all.[19] Some are humorous, or may representthe couple's hobby or occupation. Some couples use a piece of artwhich will be displayed in their home later, such as a statuette orChristmas ornament.Some couples skip the topper altogether ordecorate the top tier with flowers.In the United Kingdom, thetraditional wedding cake is made from a rich fruitcake whoseingredients last without degrading. This allowed the top tier to bestored after the wedding, to be eaten at the christening of thefirst child. Many modern cakes now consist of flavors such asvanilla sponge, chocolate sponge or carrot cake.Most cakes arebetween three and five tiers in height. Royal wedding cakes areamong the more elaborate cakes seen in the United Kingdom.
Barbecue BBQ Recipes 2.27
CamBo Media
Barbecue BBQ Recipes - Shrimps Steaks Grill and moreBarbecue (alsobarbeque, BBQ and barby/barbies) is both a cooking method and anapparatus. The generally accepted differences between barbecuingand grilling are cooking durations and the types of heat used.Grilling is generally done quickly over moderate-to-high directheat that produces little smoke, while barbecuing is done slowlyover low, indirect heat and the food is flavored by the smokingprocess.The word barbecue when used as a noun can refer to thecooking method, the meat cooked in this way, the cooking apparatus(the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue"), or to an event wherethis style of food is featured. Used as an adjective, "barbecued"refers to foods cooked by this method. The term is also used as averb for the act of cooking food in this manner. Barbecuing isusually done out-of-doors by smoking the meat over wood orcharcoal. Restaurant barbecue may be cooked in large brick or metalovens designed for that purpose. There are numerous regionalvariations of barbecuing, and it is practiced around many areas ofthe world.Dishes for exampleAkçaabatmeatballsAnticuchosArrosticiniAsado – a term used both for a rangeof barbecue techniques and the social event of having or attendinga barbecueBarbacoaBarbecue chicken Barbecue sandwichBeef ribsBeefsteak Brisket Burnt endsBrochetteBulgogiBull roastCarneasadaCha siu baoChuanr ChurrascoCocoloşiCorn on the cobDakkochiEspetadaFatányérosFrigăruiGalinha à AfricanaIsawJeokJujehkababKabab BargKai yangKebab KhorkhogKoftekebabLechonMashawiMéchoui – A North African dish that consists of awhole sheep or a lamb spit-roasted on a barbecueMeuravYerushalmiMixiote MućkalicaPig pickin'Pig roast PinchitosPork ribsPork shoulder ProvoletaPulled porkRažnjićiSausageSatayShashlikSpare ribsSosatieSouvlakiSuckling pigSuyaTsukuneYakitori
Tablets 2015 1.30
CamBo Media
Best Tablets 2015