1.0.3 / September 7, 2015
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Description

Officials in the United States Department ofAgriculture (USDA) have determined that certain species not nativeto the U.S. are at risk of becoming invasive should they enter thiscountry. As part of its effort to prevent the introduction ofinvasive or potentially invasive weeds, the USDA maintains anofficial list of "federal noxious weeds" (FNW) (7 CFR 360.200 and361.6). Many taxa on this list are currently serious weedselsewhere in the world, and about two-thirds of the taxa arecurrently found in the U.S. Most of the FNW taxa are angiosperms,but a few are ferns and one is a green alga. NOTE that the fernsand alga are not included in this app.

Fruits and seeds are the plant disseminules most responsible forthe spread of weeds to new regions. Federal Noxious WeedDisseminules of the U.S. Keys was developed to enable accurateidentification of FNW angiosperm disseminules. The three keys(Grasses=Poaceae; Legumes=Fabaceae; and Other Angiosperm PlantFamilies) were designed to be used by officials at U.S. portsresponsible for identification of plant pests. It may also be auseful resource for seed professionals and anyone else with aninterest in, or a need to know about, noxious weeddisseminules.

Thirty-one families are currently represented on the FNW list asof 2013. Most of the taxa are individual species, but two arespecies complexes, Rubus fruticosus L. agg. and Salviniaauriculata complex (not included in the app key since anaquatic ferm), and one is an infraspecific taxon (Setariapumila (Poir.) Roem. & Schult. ssp. pallidefusca(Schumach) B. K. Simon). Note that fact sheets for the FNW speciesof six genera Aeginetia, Alectra, Cuscuta,Moraea, Orobanche, Striga have been treatedtogether in their own "genus-level" fact sheets.

The three interactive family keys include only those FNW taxathat produce seed and fruit disseminules (i.e., angiosperms). Eighttaxa are not included in the interactive keys either because theylack angiosperm sexual reproduction altogether or they produce seedonly rarely. One group lacking fruits and seeds are the ferns,which reproduce via spores as well as by vegetative means.Reproduction via vegetative disseminules is the primary means ofdispersal for some non-ferns (three angiosperms and an alga) aswell. The eight taxa not in the keys are the terrestial fernsLygodium flexuosum (L.) Sw. and Lygodium microphyllum(Cav.) R. Br., the aquatic ferns Azolla pinnata R.Br. andthe Salvinia auriculata complex, the aquatic angiospermsHydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Lagarosiphonmajor (Ridley) Moss, the sterile angiosperm hybrid Opuntiaaurantiaca Lindl., and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia(Vahl) Agardh.

All photographic images were produced by the authors exceptwhere acknowledged in image captions. See FNW tool for properguidelines for use and citation of images. The majority of originalillustrations were drawn by Lesley Randall. The remainder weredrawn by Ingrid Hogle and Julia Scher. Drawings by Lynda E.Chandler are from Gunn and Ritchie (1988). Drawings by Regina O.Hughes are from Terrell and Peterson (1993) and Reed (1977).

Key authors: Julia Scher and Deena Walters

This key is part of a complete FNW tool: http://itp.lucidcentral.org/id/fnw/

Lucid Mobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP

App Information Federal Noxious Weeds Key

  • App Name
    Federal Noxious Weeds Key
  • Package Name
    com.lucidcentral.mobile.fnw_tool
  • Updated
    September 7, 2015
  • File Size
    32M
  • Requires Android
    Android 4.0 and up
  • Version
    1.0.3
  • Developer
    LucidMobile
  • Installs
    1,000 - 5,000
  • Price
    Free
  • Category
    Education
  • Developer
    Visit website Email support@lucidcentral.org
    P.O Box 5486 Stafford Heights, QLD, 4053 Australia
  • Google Play Link

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Officials in the United States Department ofAgriculture (USDA) have determined that certain species not nativeto the U.S. are at risk of becoming invasive should they enter thiscountry. As part of its effort to prevent the introduction ofinvasive or potentially invasive weeds, the USDA maintains anofficial list of "federal noxious weeds" (FNW) (7 CFR 360.200 and361.6). Many taxa on this list are currently serious weedselsewhere in the world, and about two-thirds of the taxa arecurrently found in the U.S. Most of the FNW taxa are angiosperms,but a few are ferns and one is a green alga. NOTE that the fernsand alga are not included in this app.Fruits and seeds are the plant disseminules most responsible forthe spread of weeds to new regions. Federal Noxious WeedDisseminules of the U.S. Keys was developed to enable accurateidentification of FNW angiosperm disseminules. The three keys(Grasses=Poaceae; Legumes=Fabaceae; and Other Angiosperm PlantFamilies) were designed to be used by officials at U.S. portsresponsible for identification of plant pests. It may also be auseful resource for seed professionals and anyone else with aninterest in, or a need to know about, noxious weeddisseminules.Thirty-one families are currently represented on the FNW list asof 2013. Most of the taxa are individual species, but two arespecies complexes, Rubus fruticosus L. agg. and Salviniaauriculata complex (not included in the app key since anaquatic ferm), and one is an infraspecific taxon (Setariapumila (Poir.) Roem. & Schult. ssp. pallidefusca(Schumach) B. K. Simon). Note that fact sheets for the FNW speciesof six genera Aeginetia, Alectra, Cuscuta,Moraea, Orobanche, Striga have been treatedtogether in their own "genus-level" fact sheets.The three interactive family keys include only those FNW taxathat produce seed and fruit disseminules (i.e., angiosperms). Eighttaxa are not included in the interactive keys either because theylack angiosperm sexual reproduction altogether or they produce seedonly rarely. One group lacking fruits and seeds are the ferns,which reproduce via spores as well as by vegetative means.Reproduction via vegetative disseminules is the primary means ofdispersal for some non-ferns (three angiosperms and an alga) aswell. The eight taxa not in the keys are the terrestial fernsLygodium flexuosum (L.) Sw. and Lygodium microphyllum(Cav.) R. Br., the aquatic ferns Azolla pinnata R.Br. andthe Salvinia auriculata complex, the aquatic angiospermsHydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Lagarosiphonmajor (Ridley) Moss, the sterile angiosperm hybrid Opuntiaaurantiaca Lindl., and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia(Vahl) Agardh.All photographic images were produced by the authors exceptwhere acknowledged in image captions. See FNW tool for properguidelines for use and citation of images. The majority of originalillustrations were drawn by Lesley Randall. The remainder weredrawn by Ingrid Hogle and Julia Scher. Drawings by Lynda E.Chandler are from Gunn and Ritchie (1988). Drawings by Regina O.Hughes are from Terrell and Peterson (1993) and Reed (1977).Key authors: Julia Scher and Deena WaltersThis key is part of a complete FNW tool: http://itp.lucidcentral.org/id/fnw/Lucid Mobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP
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